History Department
History Department

Jimena Perry


MPhil Social Anthropology, MA History, University of Cambridge, UK; University of Texas at Austin

Jimena Perry

Contact

Interests


Modern Latin America, digital humanities, violence, memory, trauma, and museums

Biography


I am a Ph.D. candidate in Latin American History. My dissertation, “Trying to Remember: Museums and Memories of Violence in Colombia, 2000-2014,” explores how cultural diversity operates in remembering and forgetting violent events through museums and exhibitions. Intertwining the histories of museums, memory, violence, and cultural heritage, my dissertation highlights the politics of memorialization surrounding Latin American armed conflicts and the paths to transitional justice.

My work engages with the study of memory sites in Colombia, specifically investigating how social groups use museums and exhibitions in their grieving and social recovery process. Through ethnographic fieldwork and archival research of four Colombian case studies, I aim to understand how historical memories of the recent armed conflict of the country (1980s to early 2000s) are the product of cultural decisions that intend to keep violence from recurring. My core interests can be encapsulated in a few basic questions. Which are the narratives Colombian museums privilege as historical memories? How is violence represented in memory sites, museums, and exhibitions? What is the role of these places in contemporary Colombian society? Finally, how do Colombian remembrances of its internal war fit in a regional Latin American context? These questions get to the heart of ongoing discussions about the nature of memory as well as debates over transitional justice and heritage in countries around the world. My analysis is situated within a growing number of studies that consider the function of museums and exhibitions in the remembrance and representation of atrocities. I am especially interested in how marginal communities create narratives that allow them to feel like part of the nation, with the attendant rights and privileges of citizenship. 

Courses


HIS 310L • Lat Am Civ: Natl Experience

38009 • Fall 2019
Meets MWF 12:00PM-1:00PM SZB 370
GC (also listed as LAS 310)

This course provides a survey of the history of Latin America from the wars of independence at the beginning of the nineteenth century through the present. We will look at the process of nation building in the aftermath of independence, the rise of the Age of Liberalism in the late nineteenth century and the emergence of military and revolutionary movements in the twentieth century. The course will focus on such key themes as liberalism, racial and gender relations, populism, religion, communism, revolution and democracy. Alongside these key themes we will devote a significant portion of the semester examining Latin America’s relation with the world – especially with the United States – and how this relationship has shaped Latin American societies.

SPN 610D • First-Year Spanish II

45050 • Spring 2019
Meets MWF 10:00AM-11:00AM MEZ B0.302
Hybrid/Blended

Focus on the development of multilingual literacy through the analysis and use of Spanish to achieve linguistic competence (commands, subjunctive, hypotheticals, future), communication and interactional competence (disagreeing, suggesting, turn taking), and metalinguistic competence (critical analysis of oral and written texts, dialectal differences).

SPN 610D • First-Year Spanish II

45589 • Fall 2018
Meets MWF 4:00PM-6:00PM JES A207A

Focus on the development of multilingual literacy through the analysis and use of Spanish to achieve linguistic competence (commands, subjunctive, hypotheticals, future), communication and interactional competence (disagreeing, suggesting, turn taking), and metalinguistic competence (critical analysis of oral and written texts, dialectal differences).