History Department
History Department

Signe Fourmy


B.A. University of Notre Dame, J.D. University of Houston Law Center

Contact

  • Office: TBD
  • Office Hours: Summer 2018: Mondays 2:45-3:45, and Thursdays 9-11. And by appointment.

Interests


Slavery, Resistance, Gender, Criminality, US constitutional history, legal history, and early US history

Courses


HIS N315K • The United States, 1492-1865

81960 • Summer 2019
Meets MTWTH 11:30AM-1:00PM JGB 2.216

This class will cover United States history from European exploration of North America (1492) to the culmination of the Civil War (1865). Lectures, discussions, and assignments will encourage students to think critically, analyze competing points of view, and develop and articulate an understanding of important events, themes, people, and changes over time.  

We will examine pivotal events in American history such as reasons for colonization; the causes and consequences of the American War for Independence; the creation and ratification of the U.S. Constitution; the evolution of political thought through the Early Republic and antebellum periods; the emergence of sectional loyalties that contributed to divisions between the Southern slaveholding and Northern free states; and the causes and results of the Civil War. In addition to studying these specific events, we will look at broader historical shifts such as the gradual transition from indentured servitude to race-based slavery; the emergence of republicanism; the development of the free labor ideology; the role of religion in shaping American culture; the transition from an agrarian to a market economy; and technological innovations that revolutionized travel, communication, and warfare.

We will examine the people, ideas, and legislation that shaped American life, paying special attention to the themes of race and gender. Focusing on the long arc of slavery as central to the development of American economy and prosperity, we will consider the transition from indentured servitude to race-based slavery; the role of slavery in defining liberty and citizenship; the political and social conflicts stemming from the expansion of the domestic slave trade; and the abolition of slavery. In tandem with race, we will focus on gender in order to evaluate whether concepts of domestic and public spheres adequately defined women’s roles in the home and community; assess women’s contributions to religious and reform movements; and consider how women participated in the emerging political economy of early America.

History is more than the study of dates—it is the examination of peoples’ public and private lives; it is the consideration of individuals’ and groups’ actions, perspectives, motivations, successes, failures, and purposes; it is understanding how and why people acted, interacted, and reacted the ways that they did. Understanding history involves analyzing how actions and reactions shaped life locally, regionally, and nationally. History is the study of continuity and change in communities—large and small—across time and space. Therefore, we will endeavor to connect issues confronting our 21st century world to their historical roots in order to understand how the past has shaped the present/future.

 

REQUIRED READING:

-    Online Text: The American Yawp

-    Williams, Heather A. American Slavery: A Very Short Introduction. New York: Oxford University Press, 2014.

-    Primary Source Readings, posted on Canvas

 

EXAMS & ASSIGNMENTS:

-    Attendance 10%

-    In-Class Quizzes 10%

-    Midterm 20%

-    Primary Source Analysis Assignments 25%

-    Final Exam 35%

 

HIS F315K • The United States, 1492-1865

82865 • Summer 2018
Meets MTWTHF 1:00PM-2:30PM CAL 100

This class will cover United States history from European exploration of North America (1492) to the culmination of the Civil War (1865). Lectures, discussions, and assignments will encourage students to think critically, analyze competing points of view, and develop and articulate an understanding of important events, themes, people, and changes over time.  
We will examine pivotal events in American history such as reasons for colonization; the causes and consequences of the American War for Independence; the creation and ratification of the U.S. Constitution; the evolution of political thought through the Early Republic and antebellum periods; the emergence of sectional loyalties that contributed to divisions between the Southern slaveholding and Northern free states; and the causes and results of the Civil War. In addition to studying these specific events, we will look at broader historical shifts such as the gradual transition from indentured servitude to race-based slavery; the emergence of republicanism; the development of the free labor ideology; the role of religion in shaping American culture; the transition from an agrarian to a market economy; and technological innovations that revolutionized travel, communication, and warfare.
We will examine the people, ideas, and legislation that shaped American life, paying special attention to the themes of race and gender. Focusing on the long arc of slavery as central to the development of American economy and prosperity, we will consider the transition from indentured servitude to race-based slavery; the role of slavery in defining liberty and citizenship; the political and social conflicts stemming from the expansion of the domestic slave trade; and the abolition of slavery. In tandem with race, we will focus on gender in order to evaluate whether concepts of domestic and public spheres adequately defined women’s roles in the home and community; assess women’s contributions to religious and reform movements; and consider how women participated in the emerging political economy of early America.
History is more than the study of dates—it is the examination of peoples’ public and private lives; it is the consideration of individuals’ and groups’ actions, perspectives, motivations, successes, failures, and purposes; it is understanding how and why people acted, interacted, and reacted the ways that they did. Understanding history involves analyzing how actions and reactions shaped life locally, regionally, and nationally. History is the study of continuity and change in communities—large and small—across time and space. Therefore, we will endeavor to connect issues confronting our 21st century world to their historical roots in order to understand how the past has shaped the present/future.

REQUIRED READING:
-    Online Text: The American Yawp
-    Williams, Heather A. American Slavery: A Very Short Introduction. New York: Oxford University Press, 2014.
-    Primary Source Readings, posted on Canvas

EXAMS & ASSIGNMENTS:
-    Attendance 10%
-    In-Class Quizzes 10%
-    Midterm 20%
-    Primary Source Analysis 15%
-    Historical Monument Video/PowerPoint 15%
-    Final Exam 30%

Profile Pages