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HMN 350 • Environmental Justice

29712 • Russell, Matthew
Meets MW 4:00PM-5:30PM CAL 200
(also listed as LAH 350)
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In this course, we will explore the origins of and contemporary issues related to environmental justice, both a form of academic scholarship as well as a social justice movement.  Since the late 1980s, researchers have been studying and interrogating global environmental policies that have had a disproportionate impact on displaced or marginalized communities in ways that are often invisible or silenced.  According to Rob Nixon, the “slow violence” of injustice in an environmental context is defined both by the long duration over which degradation and dispossession takes place and the difficulty in representing its impact: “how do we bring home – and bring emotionally to life – threats that take time to wreak havoc?”  Over the course of the semester, we will invoke a range of disciplinary perspectives, such as environmental studies, cultural geography, creative non-fiction and critical race and ethnicity studies, as we discuss how environmental justice is invoked and turned into meaningful stories of change by different communities.  Finally, we will discuss how and to what extent our own individual actions and everyday beliefs are enmeshed within the issues and concerns identified within these definitions of environmental justice or injustice. 

The essential contours of this class will be shaped by dialog.  Students will be asked to participate fully in course discussion (both online and in class (20%), to lead two to three in-class discussions (20%), to write a well-researched essay on a topic related to the environment (25%), and craft a digital project that documents either an local area of concern related to environmental justice or an area defined by interaction with students from an international university with whom we will partner (35%).  

In addition to weekly articles and news, readings for the class are likely to include the following: 

  • Bullard, Robert.  1997.  Unequal Protection: Environmental Justice and Communities of Color.  San Francisco: Sierra Club Books. 
  • Nixon, Rob. 2013.  Slow Violence and the Environmentalism of the Poor.  Cambridge, MA: Harvard University Press.
  • Pellow, David and R. Brulle, 2005.  Power, Justice and the Environment.  Cambridge, MA: MIT Press.

 

 

 


HMN 350 • Treasure Hunt Hrc Arch Rsch

29715 • Lang, Elon
Meets TTH 12:30PM-2:00PM CAL 221
(also listed as LAH 350)
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Have you ever wondered how letters, pictures, records, and other texts recovered from the past can change the telling of history? Have you ever wondered how a book, poem, play or film might have turned out differently? Have you ever wondered who or what gets left out of the stories we learn about the past? These are questions that humanities researchers can address by studying the materials preserved in archives and special collections around the world and that scholars from around the world come to study at the renowned archives at the University of Texas at Austin. As Prof. Tom Staley, former director of the Harry Ransom Center, writes, the mission of archives is to “attempt to create some order among the random remnants of history - the poetic fragment, the unfinished drawing, the unpublished novel, even the masterpiece; it is an attempt to bring the pieces of our human story together.”* In this course, students will discover, explore, and promote some islands of order that emerge from the vast cultural and historical collections at archives on the UT-Austin campus including the Ransom Center, the Dolph Briscoe Center for American History, and the LLILAS Benson Latin American Collection. In the process, students will learn essential skills for pursuing original research projects in humanities disciplines and learn how to apply these skills to bring public attention to hidden histories and marginalized voices in our culture.


HMN 358Q • Supervised Research

29725
(also listed as LAH 358Q, WGS 358Q)
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Supervised Research. Individual instruction. Prerequisite: A
University grade point average of at least 3.50 and consent of the
liberal arts honors program adviser. Only one HMN 358Q may be applied towards college honors. Course may be repeated.


HMN 370 • Senior Tutorial Course

29730
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A tutorial program of supervised reading and writing, including an individual paper or papers in which the student draws together the central directions and discoveries of his or her studies in the humanities. Humanities 370 and 679HB may not both be counted.

Prerequisite: Consent of the humanities adviser.


HMN 379 • Conference Course

29735
(also listed as CTI 379)
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Individual instruction in a topic approved by the instructor and the humanities adviser.

Prerequisite: Upper-division standing and consent of the humanities adviser.

Hour(s) to be arranged. May be repeated for credit.


HMN 679HA • Honors Tutorial Course

29740
(also listed as AHC 679HA, AHC 679HB, C C 679HA, C C 679HB, HMN 679HB, LIN 679HA, LIN 679HB, SPN 377H, WGS 679HA, WGS 679HB)
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Directed reading and research, followed by the writing of a report or the creation of a project. Humanities 370 and 679HB may not both be counted.

Prerequisite: For 679HA, admission to the Humanities Honors Program and consent of the humanities adviser; for 679HB, Humanities 679HA.

Class meets Thursdays 3-4p in PAR 214.


HMN 679HB • Honors Tutorial Course

29745
(also listed as AHC 679HA, AHC 679HB, C C 679HA, C C 679HB, HMN 679HA, LIN 679HA, LIN 679HB, SPN 377H, WGS 679HA, WGS 679HB)
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Directed reading and research, followed by the writing of a report or the creation of a project. Humanities 370 and 679HB may not both be counted.

Prerequisite: For 679HA, admission to the Humanities Honors Program and consent of the humanities adviser; for 679HB, Humanities 679HA.

Class meets Thursdays 3-4p in PAR 214.