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HMN 350 • Johnson Years

40010 • Lawrence, Mark
Meets TTH 9:30AM-11:00AM LBJ 10.150
(also listed as LAH 350)
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Nearly 50 years after it ended, the presidency of Lyndon Johnson continues to inspire enormous interest and controversy.  What sort of person was Johnson?  What motives underpinned his greatest achievements and biggest errors in both the domestic and foreign-policy arenas?  How can we reconcile the triumphs of civil rights with the setbacks of the Vietnam War?  What is LBJ’s legacy, and what place does he deserve in the long flow of American history?  These will be among the major questions at the heart of this seminar.  In addressing them, we will read and discuss scholarship on the Johnson administration and the 1960s.  We will also meet with various participants in – or close observers of – the Johnson administration who live in and around Austin. 

Course requirements will include two short essays as well as a 10-12 page research paper based on materials in the LBJ Library archive.  We will devote considerable time early in the term to identifying promising topics and learning how to use the library’s reading room.  Over the remainder of the term, students will be expected to conduct research and, in consultation with the instructors, produce a polished paper. 

Required readings will likely include Mark K. Updegrove, Indomitable Will:   LBJ in the Presidency; Maurice Isserman and Michael Kazin, America Divided:  The Civil War of the 1960s; and Mark Atwood Lawrence, The Vietnam War:  A Concise International History, as well as a packet of photocopied chapters and documents. 

 


HMN 350 • Money In Amer Politics

40015 • Roberts, Brian
Meets W 3:30PM-6:30PM CBA 4.340
(also listed as GOV 370L, LAH 350)
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LAH 350 (30295) / GOV 37OL (38845) / HMN 350 (40015) Fall 2017 

Money in American Politics 

 

Course Description 

This course explores the nature and consequences of money in American politics and why, at this point in history, we find ourselves embroiled in the most significant debate over campaign finance reform in over thirty years. The debate goes to the heart of the U.S. Constitution, pitting the First Amendment rights of speech and assembly against the perceived fairness and efficacy of a republican government awash, some claim, in increasingly unaccountable money. 

Campaign finance issues lie at the crossroads of a bewildering number of analytical perspectives. We (must) examine the work of historians, social scientists, legal scholars, and interested parties on all sides of the debate in an effort not only to assess current policy debates but also to understand how we got here. 

The objective of the course is not to persuade you of any particular point of view but, rather, to arm you with the substantive knowledge, theoretical foundation and analytical tools needed to be resolute in whatever conclusions you draw from this experience.

 

Course Requirements 

This course is an honors seminar. As such, there is a premium on preparation and participation. Final grades are based on class participation, two tests and two class projects: 

• Participation: 10% 

• Projects: 35% 

• Tests: 55% 

 Grades will be based on the +/- scale. 

 

Required Readings 

• Kuhner, Timothy K.. Capitalism v. Democracy. Stanford University Press. 2014 

• Mutch, Robert E. Buying the Vote: A History of Campaign Finance Reform. Oxford University Press. 2014 

• Post, Robert C. Citizens Divided: Campaign Finance Reform and the Constitution. Cambridge: Harvard University Press. 2016 

• Samples, John. The Fallacy of Campaign Finance Reform. Chicago: University of Chicago Press. 2006 

 

All other readings, of which there are many, are linked in the weekly reading assignments posted on Canvas.


HMN 358Q • Supervised Research

40020
(also listed as AAS 318Q, AAS 358Q, LAH 358Q)
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Supervised Research. Individual instruction. Prerequisite: A
University grade point average of at least 3.50 and consent of the
liberal arts honors program adviser. Only one HMN 358Q may be applied towards college honors. Course may be repeated.


HMN 370 • Senior Tutorial Course

40025
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A tutorial program of supervised reading and writing, including an individual paper or papers in which the student draws together the central directions and discoveries of his or her studies in the humanities. Humanities 370 and 679HB may not both be counted.

Prerequisite: Consent of the humanities adviser.


HMN 379 • Conference Course

40030
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Individual instruction in a topic approved by the instructor and the humanities adviser.

Prerequisite: Upper-division standing and consent of the humanities adviser.

Hour(s) to be arranged. May be repeated for credit.


HMN 679HA • Honors Tutorial Course

40035
(also listed as AAS 679HA, AAS 679HB, AHC 679HA, AHC 679HB, C C 679HA, C C 679HB, GK 679HA, GK 679HB, HMN 679HB, LAS 679HA, LAS 679HB, LAT 679HA, LAT 679HB, LIN 679HA, LIN 679HB, WGS 679HA, WGS 679HB)
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Directed reading and research, followed by the writing of a report or the creation of a project. Humanities 370 and 679HB may not both be counted.

Prerequisite: For 679HA, admission to the Humanities Honors Program and consent of the humanities adviser; for 679HB, Humanities 679HA.

Class meets Thursdays 3-4p in PAR 214.


HMN 679HB • Honors Tutorial Course

40040
(also listed as AAS 679HA, AAS 679HB, AHC 679HA, AHC 679HB, C C 679HA, C C 679HB, GK 679HA, GK 679HB, HMN 679HA, LAS 679HA, LAS 679HB, LAT 679HA, LAT 679HB, LIN 679HA, LIN 679HB, WGS 679HA, WGS 679HB)
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Directed reading and research, followed by the writing of a report or the creation of a project. Humanities 370 and 679HB may not both be counted.

Prerequisite: For 679HA, admission to the Humanities Honors Program and consent of the humanities adviser; for 679HB, Humanities 679HA.

Class meets Thursdays 3-4p in PAR 214.