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Liberal Arts Honors

LAH 102H • The Idea Of Liberal Arts-Wb

29685 • Musick, Marc
Meets M 4:00PM-5:30PM • Internet
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Restricted to students in the Freshman Honors Program in the College of Liberal Arts. An overview of the liberal arts disciplines.

Offered on the pass/fail basis only.


LAH 104H • Professional/Career Devel-Wb

29690 • Oldham, Tatem
Meets W 4:00PM-5:00PM • Internet
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This course is designed to help you identify your strengths and talents as a liberal arts honors student, learn to conduct an effective internship search, explore post-graduation options, create and manage a professional online brand and hone your professional skills. By the end of the course, you will have a targeted resume and cover letter, a professional LinkedIn profile, and the necessary tools to network, build your personal brand, and interview successfully.

 Course Goals:

  • Provide an open space where students can ask career questions, share experiences and learn in a group setting.
  • Identify your top strengths using the StrengthsQuest Assessment, transferrable skills and areas of expertise.
  • Explore your post-graduation options, whether that includes going directly into your career or preparing for graduate or law school.
    • Gain knowledge of career industries and narrow down your target career options.
    • Learn about graduate and professional school application processes and what you can do to prepare.
  • Create a targeted resume and cover letter ready to submit to internship opportunities.
  • Craft your liberal arts story to leverage your degree and experiences in the interview and in the workplace.
  • Review your online content and learn how to better promote your personal brand across social media platforms; Create and/or update your LinkedIn profile.
  • Create an “elevator pitch” to present your ideas in a clear and concise manner.
  • Learn how to effectively conduct an internship search and how to interview and network.
  • Learn business etiquette principals to help you succeed in a workplace or other professional environment.

Lectures will be combined with discussions, in-class exercises, small group activities, and independent activities and assignments. You are expected to complete a series of assignments in a timely manner, and to participate actively in class discussions.


LAH 112H • The Nature Of Inquiry-Wb

29710 • Brown, Virginia
Meets W 2:00PM-3:00PM • Internet
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Humans have an innate desire to investigate and to understand the unknown. Yet, we all differ in how we seek that understanding. So, how can we have confidence in the new knowledge that other people produce? Confidence is generated by the systematic use of research methods appropriate to the area of discovery. In this course, we will explore these different ways of knowing through examining the research methodologies used across disciplines in the College of Liberal Arts. LAH 112H: The Nature of Inquiry is designed for Liberal Arts Honors students in the spring semester of their sophomore year to gain an overview of the different types of research that can be done in Liberal Arts. The course will consist of guest lecturers, in-class exercises, brief required readings, and writing assignments.

 


LAH 149 • Scholars Honors Capstone

29720
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Description:

In this honors course, students will write paper(s) of substantial length to reflect upon their academic enrichment experience(s) while participating in the Liberal Arts Scholars Programs. Academic enrichment experiences that students may reflect upon include study abroad, internship, community service, leadership, or research. Students will work with a faculty mentor to write a paper that articulates what they learned from their academic enrichment experience and it impacted their views and career goals. Students will meet bimonthly with the course instructor for one hour to review progress on written work and share their reflections with classmates. 

Prerequisites: Upper Division standing, cumulative grade point average of at least 3.25. Department approval required for registration.

Grading Method: Letter Grade

Hours: 1

Restrictions: Restricted to Plan I majors in the College of Liberal Arts who are participants in the Liberal Arts Honors Scholars Program.


LAH 305 • Reacting To The Past-Wb

29695 • Lang, Elon
Meets TTH 9:30AM-11:00AM • Internet
EGCWr
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“Reacting to the Past” introduces freshmen to major philosophical ideas and texts, including the historical context in which these ideas acquired significance. Students read primary texts, adopt the personas and perspectives of historical figures, and re-enact policy debates to explore how facts and opinions shape collective decision-making in polarized political environments. Students also write six persuasive essays (4-5 pages each) to meet the UT writing flag requirement. Course themes include ethical leadership, the role of shared values in governance, the relationship of individuals to their community, and evolving concepts of citizenship.

Dr. Elon Lang's Reacting class on MWF games include The Threshold of Democracy: Athens in 403 B.C., Red Clay, 1835: Cherokee Removal and the Meaning of Sovereignty, and The Collapse of Apartheid and The Dawn of Democracy in South Africa, 1993.

In Professor Casey's class on TTH students will investigate the impact of(1) Socratic ideals of justice during the rise of democracy after the Peloponnesian War in Athens in 403 BCE; (2) Confucian ideals of morality and ethical leadership during the final years of the Ming Dynasty in China in 1587; and (3) Rousseau’s idea of collective governance–the Social Contract --during the French Revolution, 1791.

Each unit of study is presented as an elaborate role-playing game, designed and published by the Reacting to the Past National Consortium (https://reacting.barnard.edu/), with strict rules for the players and detailed guidelines for their debates. These games divide players into competing political parties with positions across the ideological spectrum, with each team striving to implement its own ideals for society. Players adopt both progressive and conservative political agendas – with a handful of students remaining “undecided,” open to persuasion by each team. Players will determine how best to attain their goals, though they will receive intellectual guidance from the classic texts and inspiration from the lives of the historical characters they are portraying.

For the first few sessions of each game, the class will meet in a traditional seminar format, where students will learn about the historical setting of the game and the philosophical issues that will animate the debates. After these introductory sessions to set the context for each game, the class will break into competing groups, as students with similar roles join forces to accomplish their objectives. Then, as debates begin, students will come to class in their character roles and will lead the sessions. The instructor takes on the role of “Game Master,” to ensure fair play, reminding students to honor the historical context of the game.
  
The heart of each game is persuasion: students must persuade the politically unaffiliated players that their team’s views make more sense than those of their opponents. They must draw upon rhetorical strategies and facts in their arguments, and learn strategies for presenting their positions with conviction and clarity. They must present their arguments in written form through persuasive essays, as well as delivering speeches and participating in open debates from their assigned viewpoints. Players learn to navigate extreme viewpoints and polarized political environments while trying to accomplish a common goal. In short, they learn to test the theories of government and leadership against their experience as politicians and leaders. After each game, players step out of their assigned roles as historical figures and come together again as modern-day students, discussing how their re-enactment did or did not mirror history. This “debriefing” session is often as important as the game itself in learning about history, the impact of philosophical ideas, and how citizens make decisions in polarized political situations.

LAH 305 • Reacting To The Past-Wb

29700 • Casey, Julie
Meets MWF 10:00AM-11:00AM • Internet
EGCWr
show description

“Reacting to the Past” introduces freshmen to major philosophical ideas and texts, including the historical context in which these ideas acquired significance. Students read primary texts, adopt the personas and perspectives of historical figures, and re-enact policy debates to explore how facts and opinions shape collective decision-making in polarized political environments. Students also write six persuasive essays (4-5 pages each) to meet the UT writing flag requirement. Course themes include ethical leadership, the role of shared values in governance, the relationship of individuals to their community, and evolving concepts of citizenship.

Dr. Elon Lang's Reacting class on MWF games include The Threshold of Democracy: Athens in 403 B.C., Red Clay, 1835: Cherokee Removal and the Meaning of Sovereignty, and The Collapse of Apartheid and The Dawn of Democracy in South Africa, 1993.

In Professor Casey's class on TTH students will investigate the impact of(1) Socratic ideals of justice during the rise of democracy after the Peloponnesian War in Athens in 403 BCE; (2) Confucian ideals of morality and ethical leadership during the final years of the Ming Dynasty in China in 1587; and (3) Rousseau’s idea of collective governance–the Social Contract --during the French Revolution, 1791.

Each unit of study is presented as an elaborate role-playing game, designed and published by the Reacting to the Past National Consortium (https://reacting.barnard.edu/), with strict rules for the players and detailed guidelines for their debates. These games divide players into competing political parties with positions across the ideological spectrum, with each team striving to implement its own ideals for society. Players adopt both progressive and conservative political agendas – with a handful of students remaining “undecided,” open to persuasion by each team. Players will determine how best to attain their goals, though they will receive intellectual guidance from the classic texts and inspiration from the lives of the historical characters they are portraying.

For the first few sessions of each game, the class will meet in a traditional seminar format, where students will learn about the historical setting of the game and the philosophical issues that will animate the debates. After these introductory sessions to set the context for each game, the class will break into competing groups, as students with similar roles join forces to accomplish their objectives. Then, as debates begin, students will come to class in their character roles and will lead the sessions. The instructor takes on the role of “Game Master,” to ensure fair play, reminding students to honor the historical context of the game.
  
The heart of each game is persuasion: students must persuade the politically unaffiliated players that their team’s views make more sense than those of their opponents. They must draw upon rhetorical strategies and facts in their arguments, and learn strategies for presenting their positions with conviction and clarity. They must present their arguments in written form through persuasive essays, as well as delivering speeches and participating in open debates from their assigned viewpoints. Players learn to navigate extreme viewpoints and polarized political environments while trying to accomplish a common goal. In short, they learn to test the theories of government and leadership against their experience as politicians and leaders. After each game, players step out of their assigned roles as historical figures and come together again as modern-day students, discussing how their re-enactment did or did not mirror history. This “debriefing” session is often as important as the game itself in learning about history, the impact of philosophical ideas, and how citizens make decisions in polarized political situations.

LAH 305 • Reacting To The Past-Wb

29705 • Casey, Julie
Meets TTH 11:00AM-12:30PM • Internet
EGCWr
show description

“Reacting to the Past” introduces freshmen to major philosophical ideas and texts, including the historical context in which these ideas acquired significance. Students read primary texts, adopt the personas and perspectives of historical figures, and re-enact policy debates to explore how facts and opinions shape collective decision-making in polarized political environments. Students also write six persuasive essays (4-5 pages each) to meet the UT writing flag requirement. Course themes include ethical leadership, the role of shared values in governance, the relationship of individuals to their community, and evolving concepts of citizenship.

Dr. Elon Lang's Reacting class on MWF games include The Threshold of Democracy: Athens in 403 B.C., Red Clay, 1835: Cherokee Removal and the Meaning of Sovereignty, and The Collapse of Apartheid and The Dawn of Democracy in South Africa, 1993.

In Professor Casey's class on TTH students will investigate the impact of(1) Socratic ideals of justice during the rise of democracy after the Peloponnesian War in Athens in 403 BCE; (2) Confucian ideals of morality and ethical leadership during the final years of the Ming Dynasty in China in 1587; and (3) Rousseau’s idea of collective governance–the Social Contract --during the French Revolution, 1791.

Each unit of study is presented as an elaborate role-playing game, designed and published by the Reacting to the Past National Consortium (https://reacting.barnard.edu/), with strict rules for the players and detailed guidelines for their debates. These games divide players into competing political parties with positions across the ideological spectrum, with each team striving to implement its own ideals for society. Players adopt both progressive and conservative political agendas – with a handful of students remaining “undecided,” open to persuasion by each team. Players will determine how best to attain their goals, though they will receive intellectual guidance from the classic texts and inspiration from the lives of the historical characters they are portraying.

For the first few sessions of each game, the class will meet in a traditional seminar format, where students will learn about the historical setting of the game and the philosophical issues that will animate the debates. After these introductory sessions to set the context for each game, the class will break into competing groups, as students with similar roles join forces to accomplish their objectives. Then, as debates begin, students will come to class in their character roles and will lead the sessions. The instructor takes on the role of “Game Master,” to ensure fair play, reminding students to honor the historical context of the game.
  
The heart of each game is persuasion: students must persuade the politically unaffiliated players that their team’s views make more sense than those of their opponents. They must draw upon rhetorical strategies and facts in their arguments, and learn strategies for presenting their positions with conviction and clarity. They must present their arguments in written form through persuasive essays, as well as delivering speeches and participating in open debates from their assigned viewpoints. Players learn to navigate extreme viewpoints and polarized political environments while trying to accomplish a common goal. In short, they learn to test the theories of government and leadership against their experience as politicians and leaders. After each game, players step out of their assigned roles as historical figures and come together again as modern-day students, discussing how their re-enactment did or did not mirror history. This “debriefing” session is often as important as the game itself in learning about history, the impact of philosophical ideas, and how citizens make decisions in polarized political situations.

LAH 340L • Legal Internships

29715 • Levy, Mark
Meets T 5:00PM-6:30PM SZB 370
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This class is designed to have an experiential learning component.

America’s laws, lawyers, and courts have charted and changed the course of American history. In our classroom discussions and readings, we will explore the role of lawyers and how the practice of law has shaped American society. As a component of Liberal Arts Frontiers, students in the Legal Internships clinic will also intern in law offices or legal settings and meet weekly in class to discuss and learn from each student-intern’s experience. The hands-on experience students gain in their public service internships will help shape our classroom discussions, from topics including legal ethics and professional development to legislative oversight and settlement negotiations. Students will learn about the practice of law and how lawyers serve the public interest while gaining practical experience and first-hand knowledge of different legal fields. 

The cornerstone of the Legal Internships clinic will be your participation as a student-intern in a legal, public policy, judicial, or legislative office. While help will be provided to select your internship before the semester begins, the final choice of where you work will be yours. The role you choose should be discussed and decided upon with your host supervisor and the course instructor. Examples of suitable host agencies include the Office of the Attorney General, the Travis County District Attorney’s Office, Texas Rio Grande Legal Aid, the Texas Public Policy Foundation, RAICES, the Office of Capital and Forensic Writs, judicial chambers, or a legislator’s office. Private legal offices are not eligible to host interns. 

Students should have their host agency selected and approved before the semester begin. 

Course Bibliography: 

Case law from the Supreme Court of the United States and Circuit Courts of Appeal, as well as scholarly articles from various law journals.

Floyd Abrams: “The Soul of the First Amendment”

Erwin Chemerinsky: “Federal Jurisdiction” (Seventh Edition)

Angela Davis: “Arbitrary Justice: The Power of the American Prosecutor”

John Hart Ely: “Democracy and Distrust: A Theory of Judicial Review”

Wortham, Scherr, Maurer, and Brooks: “Learning from Practice” 

Assignments and Grading Policy: 

The Legal Internships clinic will be graded on a +/- system. The breakdown of those grades will be on a 3-4-3 basis. For example:

100-93: A       82-80: B-

92-90: A-        …

89-87: B+       …

86-83: B         62-60: D- 

Students will be required to intern for a minimum of 9 hours per week, for 12 weeks during the semester. Students will also be required by their host supervisor to complete at least one written assignment while at their internship. Successful completion of the internship portion of the course will be ultimately decided upon by your host supervisor and the course instructor. 

Students will also be required to complete journaling exercises for class reflecting on their internship work, complete at least one written report summarizing your internship (with due respect for confidentiality concerns), and participate in classroom discussions. 

Guest Lecturers: 

Guest lecturers will visit our class to highlight various specialized areas of the law, including employment law, criminal law, and disability rights. 

How to Apply 

Application: This course has a two-step application process. The application deadline is September 5, 2020, at noon. Start the application by completing Part I of the application at https://goo.gl/Renvst. Once Part I has been approved, you will be emailed Part II. The second part of the application includes a learning agreement to be filled out electronically by you and your internship supervisor. Once you have completed both Parts I and II, LAH advisors will manually add you to the course. 

Student Eligibility: Liberal Arts Honors majors with 60+ credit hours and a GPA of 3.5 or higher are eligible to apply. 

Internship Requirements & Eligibility 

Internship Host Eligibility: To be eligible for this course, the internship host agency must be a law-related nonprofit organization, government legal office, judicial chambers, or legislative office. Examples of suitable host agencies include the Office of the Attorney General, the Travis County District or County Attorney's Office, Texas Rio Grande Legal Aid, the Texas Public Policy Foundation, Texas Appleseed, judicial chambers, or a legislator's office. Private legal offices are not eligible to host interns for this course.

Internship eligibility is reviewed on a case by case basis; however, in addition to the criteria above, the internship must (1) provide direct and daily supervision and guidance; (2) provide regular access to the supervisor; (3) assign meaningful projects; and (4) provide a professional, established working environment with a strong learning component (home-office sites, shared  or co-working sites, virtual/work from home or "in the field" internships are not eligible for the course). 

Internship Hours: In addition to the hours spent in class, interns are required to complete a minimum of 9 hours at the internship site for a minimum of 12 weeks between the first and last class days of the semester. 

Internship Search Assistance 

Liberal Arts Career Services provides a number of resources and programs designed to help you succeed in your internship search. Explore the internship page https://goo.gl/aOrsh6,  including the internship site reviews https://goo.gl/IEHfXy, or visit the appointments page https://goo.gl/Lpzuwo to learn how to make an internship coaching appointment. 

Questions? 

Contact Mark Levy at mlevy76@gmail.com or 512-560-0676 for course or employer type questions. 

Contact Liberal Arts Career Services at lacs.internships@austin.utexas.edu or 512-471-7900 for application-related questions. 

University Policy: 

The University of Texas at Austin provides, upon request, appropriate academic accommodations for qualified students with disabilities. For more information, contact the Office of the Dean of Students at 471-6259, 471-6441 TT.

 

 


LAH 350 • Archiv Advacy:exper Learn

29725 • Lang, Elon
Meets TTH 12:30PM-2:00PM BUR 214
Wr
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Course Description:

Students will use digital archives and exhibits to amplify voices that actively promote social justice, cultural awareness, and service, and to test the ethical positions about impartiality and advocacy in archival and exhibit practices. Through a client-based semester-length service project, students would work with a service organization or cultural institution in the community that has materials or records that could provide a good subject for archival inquiry and an exhibit. The students would develop a series of scaffolded projects throughout the semester in which they would collaborate with members of the organization to access records, to digitize and describe a collection of their items, and to produce a public Omeka exhibit on selections from this collection. The first major project for the students would be a “pitch” that they would deliver to the organization in which they describe their research interests and also to make a case for what the organization itself might gain by opening itself up to the students’ digital archiving and historical inquiry. Their goal would be build toward a capstone project that situates the collection in the context of both the organization’s own institutional history and a broader history of the community in which the organization is situated, and then to promote the Omeka site on behalf of the organization.

One key learning objective is for students to explore the boundary between impartiality and advocacy in the telling of historical narratives about a subject in which a client organization has a vested interest, while also navigating the organization’s concerns about privacy and publicity.

This experiential learning class will cultivate professional skills in information science, cultural outreach, media literacy, and web design--as well as teamwork, independent research, critical thinking, work ethic discipline, accountability, and creativity. 

Grading Basis:

completion of deliverable to organization with positive feedback on professional conduct (~35%), process assignments like project pitch and annotated bibliography for background research (25%), reflection essays on readings and process assignments (25%), work log (5%), participation and attendance at in-class meetings (10%) 

Proposed Readings:

Anne J. Gilliand and Michelle Caswell, “Records and their Imaginaries” Archival Science (2015)

Richard J. Cox, “The Archivist and the Community” in Community Archives: the shaping of memory (2009)

Terry Cook, “Evidence, memory, identity, and community: four shifting archival paradigms,” in Archival Science (2012)

Grant Hurley, “Community Archives, Community Clouds: Enabling Digital Preservation for Small Archives,” Archivaria 81 (2016)

Gregory Rolan, “Agency in the archive: a model for participatory recordkeeping,” in Archival Science (2016)

JCLIS special issue on Critical Archival Studies (2017) http://libraryjuicepress.com/journals/index.php/jclis/issue/view/3

Jarrett M Drake, Documenting Detention: Records of Segregation in Two U.S. Prisons. (2013).

Jarrett M Drake, Insurgent citizens: the manufacture of police records in post-Katrina New Orleans and its implications for human rights (2014)

Jeanette A. Bastian, “Taking Custody, Giving Access: A Postcustodial Role for a New Century,” Archivaria (2002)

Jeanette A. Bastian, “The records of memory, the archives of identity: celebrations, texts, and archival sensibilities,” Archival Science (2012)

Verne Harris, “Genres of the trace: memory, archives and trouble,” Archives & Manuscripts (2016)

Ricardo Punzalan and Michelle Caswell, “Critical Directions for Archival Approaches to Social Justice,” Library Quarterly (2016)

Dominique Daniel, “Documenting the Immigrant and Ethnic Experience in American Archives” The American Archivist (2010)

Additional selections may be drawn from the Critical Archives Studies Reading list:

https://docs.google.com/document/d/1oRXH3AoaUfKLhYG3Vz0apCnxWua5mFR3dPHmV-2TVy0/edit?usp=sharing 

How this course will differ from LAH 350  Treasure Hunt in Campus Archives: Giving Voice to Hidden Histories 

In ‘Treasure Hunt,’ students train throughout the semester to do original archival research, working toward a midterm seminar paper on an item found in one of the social justice-themed collections in a major campus archive: the Ransom Center, LILLAS Benson Collection, or Briscoe Center. Then, in a capstone final project, the students transform their individual research into a collaborative public-facing digital exhibit using the Omeka.net content management system. Now that this has become an established annual course, students learn a lot from the Omeka.net site built by previous years’ classes, and focus their research on what it will take to deepen and expand upon the work already showcased there. 

In practice, ‘Treasure Hunt’ requires students not only to learn how to do research but also to learn how to describe and contextualize sensitive materials from social justice collections, how to build metadata that respects copyright and ownership claims, and how to work as a team to incorporate each other’s’ work and that of their predecessors into a comprehensive whole. 

In this new course, the goal will be to train students to apply academic research skills in a non-academic context while also learning proper, ethical archival practices. Omeka.net will be a tool students can use to collect and digitize records from an organizational partner. While students, as their end goal, will produce a public-facing online exhibit like they do in ‘Treasure Hunt’, the attention here will be on how this activity will serve needs defined by an outside client—in order to amplify its voice and draw attention to its work in the community. 

As such, students will learn much more here about how to design an archival collection from scratch. This will entail learning how to make organizational choices for archival materials, developing a new regularized vocabulary to use in metadata creation, and how to translate a client’s design wishes into a format that can be implemented on the Omeka.net platform. 

Both ‘Treasure Hunt’ and ‘Archival Advocacy’ draw on course readings about the theory and ethics of archival practices and expert guest lectures from library and archive professionals. However, the emphasis on readings selected for ‘Archival Advocacy’ is on the relationship between professional museum and archive work and communities that own and preserve their own records. Archivists play a central role in creating platforms for the formation of cultural memory, so ‘Archival Advocacy’ students will read extensively on the subject of how archivists assume this responsibility.


LAH 350 • Best Pictures-Wb

29730 • Kornhaber, Donna
Meets TTH 11:00AM-12:30PM • Internet
(also listed as T C 358)
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TC 358: Best Pictures

Dr. Donna Kornhaber

Fall 2020

 

TC 358 Best Pictures is offered as a Crucible Courses offering. Crucible Courses are an opportunity for the College of Liberal Arts’ most creative professors to develop new ways to teach our best students.  The approaches can be cross-discipline and synthetic, or focused and molecular. Students can expect each course to be focused on experiential learning.

 

Students can expect:

 

  • To study film in the “present tense” as a living medium, an art form very much still in the making and engaged in an ongoing process of re-invention
  • The opportunity to learn from acclaimed visitors, including Academy Film Scholars and film professionals
  • Access to the Austin Film Festival for all class participants (all expenses paid)
  • The chance to record their film festival experience via The Best Pictures Project website
  • An opportunity to continue research as one of three Best Pictures Fellows during the spring 2020 semester (access to The Sundance Film Festival and the SXSW Film Festival – all expenses paid)

 

About the Professor: Dr. Kornhaber is the recipient of numerous UT teaching awards and she has been named as an Academy Film Scholar by the Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences.  She holds a Ph.D. from Columbia University, in addition to an M.F.A. and B. F. A. from New York University and is currently an Associate Professor in the Department of English at the University of Texas at Austin.  Dr. Kornhaber is also the author of several acclaimed books on the study of film including: Charlie Chaplin, DirectorWes Anderson: A Collector’s Cinema; and Nightmares in the Dream Sanctuary: War and the Animated Film.

 

Application: Please complete and submit the application form in electronic format as a PDF file to Brice Ezell via email ( briceezell@utexas.edu ).  The deadline to submit is 5:00 p.m. on Friday, April 10, 2020.  Late applications will not be considered.   All students who apply will be notified of their application status by April 17, 2020.  

Detailed Best Pictures Description: Best Pictures is designed to be not only a class but also a larger film studies experience.  In the century since its inception, the cinema has given rise to a canonical body of films that are studied in classrooms the world over.  The typical film studies class selects its material almost entirely out of this storied past, perhaps incorporating one or two films from recent years.  In Best Pictures, however, students will study film in the present tense.  Instead of reaching back into history, Best Pictures will take as its core material the most acclaimed films of the previous year only: the Academy Award nominees for Best Picture, the winner of the Palme d’Or at Cannes, the Grand Jury Prize Winner at Sundance, the Golden Bear awardee at the Berlinale, and other similarly feted pictures.  More than a classroom experience, Best Pictures will thrust students into the midst of the film world of today, with visits from professional filmmakers and accomplished film scholars speaking about their own personal “best pictures” of the previous year, full-access passes to the myriad events of the Austin Film Festival, and, for three Best Pictures Fellows, trips in the spring term to the Sundance Film Festival as well as the South by Southwest Film Festival in Austin (all expenses paid).  The goal of the course and the larger experience offered to the Fellows is to introduce students to the study of film as a living medium, an art form very much still in the making and engaged in an ongoing process of re-invention.  In the best films of today, we can see the echoes and influences of key works from cinema’s past—indeed, connecting today’s award-winning films to the cinema classics that form their unspoken genealogy will be a central part of the classroom experience.  At the same time, the course aims to recognize and celebrate the new voices emerging in today’s cinematic landscape and to highlight the work of women and minority filmmakers whose voices have been underrepresented throughout most of film history.  The students who enroll in Best Pictures will gain the same in-depth understanding of the language and methodologies of film studies as the students in any traditional film studies course, but they will do so in the context of experiencing the excitement and creative energy of the ever-changing film industry today.

 

 

 

-- 


LAH 350 • Global Sustainability/Soil-Wb

29734 • Beach, Timothy
Meets TTH 12:30PM-2:00PM • Internet
show description

GRG 356 “Global Sustainability and Soil”

"What I stand for is what I stand on."

— Wendell Berry

Soil is our least understood but greatest natural resource and our most biodiverse ecosystem. Despite its importance, soil degradation is happening at high rates around the world, which leads to hundreds of billions of dollars of economic and ecosystem service losses.  This course considers soils in the critical zone, including how they form, provide fertility to ecosystems and crops, how their ecosystems function, their distinguishing characteristics in Nature, their taxonomy, and their spatial variability around the globe. The course also considers how soils change both in negative and positive terms over time, such as carbon and other elemental fluxes, soil erosion, desertification, and soil pollution.  The course then considers how we manage soils for a sustainable planet by sequestering carbon to counter climate change, treat soil and water pollution, conserve soil ecosystems, build soil fertility, and grow more crops with minimal environmental impacts.  Specific topics will include biochar, terra preta, organic agriculture, the soil science in World Food Prizes (i.e., development), and agroecosystems. Three lecture hours a week for one semester.

 BASIC OBJECTIVES: LEARNING GOALS

*introduce soils and sustainability

*introduce soils in agricultural systems from indigenous to industrial

*understand soils from perspectives of global change

*recognize the parameters of soil formation

* recognize the major global soils and their ecosystems

*comprehend the major mechanisms of the soils at multiple places and time scales

*recognize the parameters of human-induced and natural soil changes

*judge cases of soil and humans interactions around the world    

*develop essential tools for analyzing soils and erosion in the lab and field

*understand USDA, FAO, and Folk taxonomies

“In modesty and humility, be like the soil.”  Rumi, c. 1250 C.E.


LAH 350 • Lit And Social Justice: Hon

29735 • Heinzelman, Susan
Meets TTH 11:00AM-12:30PM GEA 105
Wr (also listed as E 343J)
show description

E 343J  l  Literature and Social Justice: HONORS

 

[previously offered as E360S.1]

 

Instructor:  Heinzelman, S

Unique #: 34945

Semester:  Fall 2020

Cross-lists:  LAH 350

 

Prerequisites:  Nine semester hours of coursework in English or rhetoric and writing.

 

Description:  What do “humanitarianism” and “human rights” have to do with the humanities?  In what ways can literature contribute to a consideration of these pressing questions in the early 21st century?  In a globalizing culture, our interest will be both international and domestic, looking at ways in which personal stories contribute to political histories.  In focusing on topics of “social justice,” we will consider such questions as environmental justice, women’s rights, children, immigration and refugees.

 

Texts (subject to change):  Coetzee: Waiting for the Barbarians; Rankine: Citizen: An American Lyric; Herrera: Signs Preceding the End of the World; plus+ additional sources and resources, electronic and otherwise.

 

Requirements & Grading:  The class will be conducted as much as possible as a seminar and discussion and attendance will be emphasized.  In addition to readings and occasional quizzes (as/if required), writing assignments will include weekly reaction responses, paper proposal and final paper (which will count for 75% of the final grade).

 

Attendance and participation = 15% of the final grade.


LAH 350 • Modernism And Media

29740 • Amleshi, Natalie
Meets TTH 12:30PM-2:00PM PAR 206
(also listed as E 350R)
show description

E 350R  l  Modernism and Media: HONORS

 

Instructor:  Amleshi, N

Unique #: 35000

Semester:  Fall 2020

Cross-lists:  LAH 350

 

Prerequisites:  Nine semester hours of coursework in English or rhetoric and writing.

 

Description:  This course offers an introduction to literary modernism through the frame of the radically transforming media ecology of the early twentieth century.  Tracing the emergence of modernist aesthetics in conjunction with the rise of modern communication networks, the course explores the social, political, and mass-cultural context shaping the “high” culture of modernism.  A number of new technologies—telegraph, typewriter, phonograph, radio, film—forced writers to rethink the form and function of literary art in response to a growing audience of mass-cultural consumers and a transforming human sensorium. Exploring continuities between the past and present, the course will examine how modern authors register these (and other) technologies as both inspiration and competition—and how that ambivalence shapes the aesthetic strategies of modern literary art.  In addition to modernist literature and film, we will read some of the major texts of media theory from the early twentieth century to the present.  The course will give aesthetic and historical depth to “modernism” while also offering an introduction to key theorists and debates in media studies.

 

Literature, audio, and film may include:  Bram Stoker, Dracula; E.M. Forster, “The Machine Stops”; Joseph Conrad, The Secret Agent; W.E.B. Du Bois, from The Souls of Black Folk; Poetry magazine & BLAST; Ezra Pound, selected poems & radio broadcasts; Virginia Woolf, selected short fiction and prose; D.H. Lawrence, selected fiction; Gertrude Stein, selected poems; James Joyce, “Aeolus”; Nathanael West, The Day of the Locust & Miss Lonelyhearts; Dziga Vertov, Man with a Movie Camera; Orson Welles, The War of the Worlds (radio broadcast and script); Langston Hughes, selected poems & Ask Your Mama: 12 Moods for Jazz; Bessie Smith phonograph recordings; Samuel Beckett, Krapp’s Last Tape.

 

Requirements & Grading:  Attendance; Consistent, substantial, and active participation (15%); Reading quizzes and discussion forum participation (15%); In-class presentation (10%); Critical analysis essay (6-8 pages) (20%); Final research project (10-12 pages) (40%).


LAH 350 • Pub Pol Intrnships/Advocacy-Wb

29744 • Merfish, Brett
Meets T 3:30PM-5:00PM • Internet
show description
Public policy shapes our society and our lives in big and small ways. This course will provide an introduction to political institutions and processes through which public policy is made in the United States at various levels and branches of government. We will also explore how public policy can be changed and challenged and the role that public policy professionals and advocates can play in that process.

This course will use case studies, policy reports, and articles on current issues to provide concrete examples of how public policy is made, functions, and how public policy can be changed. Students will learn about policy analysis, research and data collection, and advocacy.Students will learn how to gather information via research and open records requests and then apply that data to understand how policies are working.The course will also cover legislative history and its role in understanding why a policy is the way it is.
 
Examples of issues the course may cover include but are not limited to juvenile justice, youth homelessness, criminal justice, and the school to prison pipeline. Readings will include case studies on relevant policy issues(such as from graduate university presses like Georgetown University), policy reports from statewide and national policy organizations (such as Texas Appleseed and the Vera Institute), administrative rule making materials (such as public comments to state agencies), and advocacy materials including testimony before state lawmakers and lobbying handouts (such as those used by groups like the Texas Fair Lending Alliance or Texans Care for Children).
 
Through this course, you will participate in a public policy oriented internship. This position can focus on an issue or institution of interest to you, and while assistance will be provided to select your internship before the semester begins, where you work is your decision. The role you select should be discussed and decided upon with your host supervisor and the course instructor. Examples of suitable host agencies include county and city officials, city, county, or state agencies, area non-profit organizations that have policy as part of their mission, public policy think tanks (e.g. the Texas Public Policy Foundation and Center for Public Policy Priorities), and state legislators’ offices. Students should make their best effort to have their host agency selected and approved before the semester begins.
 
To be eligible for this course, the internship host agency must be a policy-related nonprofit organization, government agency, or elected official’s office at the city, county or state level. Internship eligibility is reviewed on a case-by-case basis. The internship must (1) provide direct and daily supervision and guidance; (2) provide regular access to the supervisor; (3) assign meaningful projects; and (4) provide a professional, established working environment with a strong learning component (home-office sites, shared or co-working sites, virtual/work from home or "in the field" internships are not eligible for the course).The hands-on experience students will gain in their public service internships will help shape classroom discussions. Students will learn about the field of public policy while gaining practical experience and first-hand knowledge of what it is like to work in public policy.
 

LAH 350 • Rejection Immunity

29745 • Roberts, Daron
Meets TTH 2:00PM-3:30PM UTC 4.124
(also listed as T C 325)
show description

Course Description

The graduate school application process, startup pitch competitions and Tinder all have one thing in common. Can you guess what it is? Simply put, they all feature the risk of rejection. 

When was the last time that you took a big risk in life? Did you get the outcome you wished for or did you meet rejection? 

In this course, we will explore the neuroscience and psychology behind how the brain calculates risk in various aspects of our lives. Moreover, we will unpack the phenomenon of “rejection” and craft research-based “response systems” to help guide our future interactions with receiving a “no”. 

Each week, a guest speaker will provide a unique perspective based on his/her experience with rejection. Guests will include: a Shark Tank participant, actress, startup team, car salesman and Mormon. These firsthand narratives will inform our research into how humans can build positive rejection therapy models. 

The area of rejection is of particular interest to Professor Roberts. He was wait-listed at Harvard Law School for four consecutive years and received nearly 200 rejection letters in his quest to secure a football coaching internship. This course builds on research that Roberts has conducted at The University of Texas along with Dr. Veronica Jung. 

Required Readings

Blount, Jeb. Objections: The Ultimate Guide for Mastering the Art and Science of Getting Past No. Wiley, 2018.

Jiang, Jia. Rejection Proof: How I Beat Fear and Became Invincible. Thorpe, 2016.

Palmer, Amanda, and Brown Brené. The Art of Asking: How I Learned To Stop Worrying and Let People Help. Grand Central Publishing, 2015.

Savage, Elayne. Don't Take It Personally: The Art of Dealing with Rejection. Open Road Distribution, 2016. 

Assignments

Students will write three (3) speaker response papers (25%), participate in class discussions (25%), and craft small-scale rejection research projects (50%).

 
  
 
 
 

LAH 350 • Shakespeare-Wb

29750 • Bruster, Douglas
Meets MWF 10:00AM-11:00AM • Internet
GCWr
show description

E 321  l  Shakespeare-HONORS

 

Instructor:  Bruster, D

Unique #: 34860

Semester:  Fall 2020

Cross-lists:  LAH 350

 

Prerequisites:  Nine semester hours of coursework in English or rhetoric and writing.

 

Description:  This course, a seminar in literary forensics, will survey Shakespeare’s beginnings as a writer by emphasizing questions of form, authorship, and chronology. Throughout, our focus will be on the materiality of Shakespeare's famous style, and how it developed. When and how did Shakespeare become "Shakespeare"?  After 400, years how do we know what he wrote, and when? What were his literary contexts like in the early 1590s, and how might he have changed them?  To answer such questions, we will focus on two of his earliest plays, Titus Andronicus and The Taming of the Shrew, as well as selected sonnets. Current scholarship on Shakespeare's biography, style, and first writings will augment our reading of these primary texts.

 

Recommended Text:  I will order separate paperback editions of the works we will read.  However, you may use any scholarly edition of Shakespeare's works (in single-volume version or as separate paperbacks).  Please check with the instructor if you have questions about the suitability of an edition or editions.

 

Requirements & Grading (subject to change upon notice):  This course will culminate in an original research essay of approximately 15 pp. in length, worth 50% of the final grade.  In addition to this paper, you will be expected to write several shorter essays (worth 20%, combined), make a formal presentation (15%), and contribute meaningfully to class discussion (15%). Regular attendance and participation are required.


LAH 350 • Sicily: Myth/Rlty/Mafia-Wb

29775 • Carter, Daniela
Meets TTH 2:00PM-3:30PM • Internet
show description

At the cross of the Mediterranean, placed at the most strategic location, Sicily has been the coveted island of Greeks, Romans, Arabs, Normans, Spaniards. These diverse civilizations contributed to the creation of a Sicilian culture that is unique in its richness and complexity. The course will briefly survey the artistic traces left by those civilizations placing them in dialogue with the present Sicilian reality they contributed to create. From the Greek temples of Agrigento and Segesta through the Byzantine mosaics of Palermo and Cefalù, the baroque Spanish churches, to the lush colors of Guttuso’s paintings, the course will try to tie together the visual images of Sicily with its literary and filmic expressions.  Major historical and social phenomena such as Mafia, Italian unification, sexual mores will be discussed through the texts of Verga, Pirandello, Sciascia, Tomasi di Lampedusa, and films by Petri, Visconti, Germi, Taviani brothers, Giordana, Crialese, Amenta. 

TEXTS:

Verga, Giovanni: selected short stories on Canvas

Pirandello, Luigi: Selected short stories on Canvas (please, print them for class discussion, since laptops, iPhone, iPads should not be used in class)

Tomasi di Lampedusa, Giuseppe: The Leopard

Brancati, Vitaliano: Beautiful Antonio

Sciascia, Leonardo. The Day of the Owl

___________ Parts of Sicily as Metaphor 

FILMS

Amenta, Marco: The Sicilian Girl

Pietro Germi: Seduced and Abandoned

__________ : Divorce Italian Style

Traviani Brothers: Kaos

Crialese, Manuele: Respiro

Marco Tullio Giordana: The One Hundred Steps

Visconti, Luchino:  The Leopard

On Canvas: Power points of Greek temples in Agrigento, Segesta, Senilunte; of Sicilian Baroque Architecture; of paintings by Antonello da Messina and Renato Guttuso with relative texts. 

Grades:

First Exam 30%; Second Exam 40%; research paper 20%; Class Participation 10%

 

                                               

 

 


LAH 350 • Soc Ineq & Health In U.s.

29755 • Musick, Marc
Meets TTH 12:30PM-2:00PM MEZ B0.306
CD (also listed as H S 340, SOC 321K)
show description

This course examines patterns of health and illness in the US and their possible causes.  By focusing on societal structures and demographic trends, the course is able to uncover the ways in which American society and social interactions shape health outcomes across the adult population.  Some attention in the course is also devoted to the healthcare system in the US and the ways in which it leads to certain population health outcomes.  The course is designed with experiential learning in mind, thus it requires students to undertake projects that help them better understand how health outcomes are patterned in the community around UT Austin. 

Potential Readings

Healthy People 2020.  US Government.

Mama Might be Better off Dead.  Laurie Kaye Abraham

The Social Transformation of American Medicine.  Paul Starr.

Ideas about Illness.  Uta Gerhardt.


LAH 350 • The Johnson Years-Wb

29765 • Lawrence, Mark
Meets TTH 9:30AM-11:00AM • Internet
(also listed as HMN 351C)
show description

Nearly 50 years after it ended, the presidency of Lyndon Johnson continues to inspire enormous interest and controversy.  What sort of person was Johnson?  What motives underpinned his greatest achievements and biggest errors in both the domestic and foreign-policy arenas?  How can we reconcile the triumphs of civil rights with the setbacks of the Vietnam War?  What is LBJ’s legacy, and what place does he deserve in the long flow of American history?  These will be among the major questions at the heart of this seminar.  In addressing them, we will read and discuss scholarship on the Johnson administration and the 1960s.  We will also meet with various participants in – or close observers of – the Johnson administration who live in and around Austin. 

Course requirements will include two short essays as well as a 10-12 page research paper based on materials in the LBJ Library archive.  We will devote considerable time early in the term to identifying promising topics and learning how to use the library’s reading room.  Over the remainder of the term, students will be expected to conduct research and, in consultation with the instructors, produce a polished paper.  

Required readings will likely include Mark K. Updegrove, Indomitable Will:   LBJ in the Presidency; Maurice Isserman and Michael Kazin, America Divided:  The Civil War of the 1960s; and Mark Atwood Lawrence, The Vietnam War:  A Concise International History, as well as a packet of photocopied chapters and documents. 

 

 

 

 

 


LAH 350 • Wes Anderson-Wb

29760 • Kornhaber, Donna
Meets TTH 9:30AM-11:00AM • Internet
Wr
show description

E 349S  l  Wes Anderson: HONORS

 

Instructor:  Kornhaber, Donna

Unique #:  34980

Semester:  Fall 2020

Cross-lists:  LAH 350

 

Prerequisites:  Nine semester hours of coursework in English or rhetoric and writing.

 

Description:  Wes Anderson – a UT Austin alum – is one of the most complex film directors working today.  Known for his meticulous visual constructions and eclectic, unmistakable sense of design, he is one of the foremost cinematic stylists of his generation; at the same time, his work shows a persistent concern with weighty issues of loss, abandonment, and alienation.  Many have criticized Anderson for what they perceive as his incessantly “twee” or “hipster” sensibilities, while others detect an unsettling emotional detachment in his work.  This course will present an in-depth look at Anderson’s full body of work, considered in light of the director’s unique visual and narrative proclivities and in terms of the various criticisms of his work that have followed his career.  We will also pay careful attention to the numerous works of classical and international cinema that influenced Anderson and to which he frequently pays homage within his films.  Topics to be considered include formalism and aestheticism; animation; music; concepts of “indiewood,” “new sincerity,” and “smart cinema”; auteurism and its criticisms; and questions of representation and appropriation in cinema.  No prior knowledge of film is required, and students can expect to leave with a solid grounding in the principles of film studies.

 

Films (tentative):  Bottle Rocket, Rushmore, The Royal Tenenbaums, The Life Aquatic with Steve Zissou, The Darjeeling Limited, Fantastic Mr. Fox, Moonrise Kingdom, The Grand Budapest Hotel, Isle of Dogs.

 

Requirements & Grading:  Class Participation: 10%; Two short essays (5 pages): 25% + 25%; Long essay (8-10 pages): 40%.


LAH 350 • Your Data/ Your Privacy

29764 • Gold, Bradley
Meets TTH 3:30PM-5:00PM WAG 420
show description

This class is designed to have an experiential learning component.

Your data is valuable, and a lot of companies and organizations would love to share and sell it.  Many say that “data is the new oil”, but is that accurate?  No prior knowledge of data analytics or privacy engineering is required, and we will discuss together what personal data is, how companies collect it, and why they might want to sell it.  This class will be a thoughtful investigation into current and upcoming standards regarding data privacy, information technology (IT) security, and related fields such as Engineered Intelligence, and related products such as autonomous vehicles.   

In this class, you will have the chance to engage in learning about a new multi-disciplinary field, and be able to bring your own knowledge and expertise to the conversation.  This class will be a thoughtful exploration of the current state of cybersecurity and data privacy both in the US and globally. We will discuss corporate interests in data privacy, consumer interests in data privacy, changes in regulations, and the impact these fields have on the average person. No prior knowledge of the subject is required, we will work together throughout the class to educate ourselves and our classmates on topics within this realm that are both of interest to us and matter to others.  During the semester, above and beyond our core course content, you will have the opportunity to research a granular topic you are interested in regarding data privacy, and teach your peers about that specific sub-topic.   

Readings

Readings will come from international standards documents, current laws, and news articles. All of which will be made available to you via canvas or in class.

Viewings

News clips and other informational videos will be assigned occasionally.  Students will also be welcome to suggest and share relevant learning materials throughout the semester.

 


LAH 351C • Afr Am Fam Hist/Cont Cntxt:hon

29780 • Pikus, Monique
Meets TTH 11:00AM-12:30PM BUR 214
CDWr
show description

Course Description

            From the time of slavery when their marriages and families were not recognized to the present where many are considered pathological, African American families have been under almost constant attack in the United States. Yet, a close examination of the changing African American family in the United States does not demonstrate its pathology but rather its resilience and adaptability to societal constraints. In this class, we will examine how African Americans managed to maintain a sense of family from the time of slavery to the present trend of mass incarceration. We will analyze how different perspectives on gender, race/ethnicity, social class and the family have been applied to African American families. In addition, we will discuss the importance of single parent and multigenerational households, extended family, fictive kin and the entire community in raising African American children. Finally, we will critique and evaluate the impact of the portrayal of African American families in academic research, politics, and the media. 

Course Readings

Given the nature of the course, students will read and discuss materials that may contain offensive language and viewpoints and/or examine upsetting topics. If you are having difficulty with the readings and/or class discussion because of this, please contact the instructor.

Book List

Books are available at the University Co-Op

Baldwin, James. 2002. (1974). If Beale Street Could Talk. New York, NY: Vintage Books.

Franklin, Donna and Angela James. 2015. Ensuring Inequality: The Structural Transformation of the African American Family, Revised Edition. New York, NY: Oxford University Press.

Jacobs, Harriet. 2001 (1861). Incidents in the Life of a Slave Girl (Dover Thrift Editions) Reprint

Edition. Mineola, NY: Dover Thrift Editions.

Pattillo, Mary. 2013. Black Picket Fences: Privilege and Peril among the Black Middle Class,

Second Edition. Chicago, IL: University of Chicago Press.

Stack, Carol. 1983 (1974). All Our Kin: Strategies for Survival in a Black Community. New York, NY: Basic Books.

Article List

Links to all articles are provided on Canvas.

Theory

Burton, Linda M., Eduardo Bonilla-Silva, Victor Ray, Rose Buckelew and Elizabeth Hordge

Freeman. 2010. “Critical Race Theories, Colorism, and the Decade's Research on Families of

Color.” Journal of Marriage and Family 72, 3: 440-459.

Ferree, Myra Marx. 2010. “Filling the Glass: Gender Perspectives on Families.” Journal of

Marriage and Family 72, 3: 420-439.

Few-Demo, April L., Áine M. Humble, Melissa A. Curran, and Sally A. Lloyd. 2016. “Queer

Theory, Intersectionality, and LGBT-Parent Families: Transformative Critical Pedagogy

in Family Theory.” Journal of Family Theory & Review 8: 74–94.

Hill, Shirley A. 2002. “Teaching and Doing Gender in African American Families.” Sex Roles

47, 11/12: 493-506.

Hooper, Lisa M. 2007. “The Application of Attachment Theory and Family Systems Theory to the Phenomena of Parentification.” The Family Journal 15, 3: 217-223.

James, Anthony G., Stephanie Irby, Mark A. Fine, and Duane Rudy. 2018. “The Central Roles of Race and Racism in Reframing Family Systems Theory: A Consideration of Choice and Time.”

Journal of Family Theory and Review 10: 419-33.

Wilson, Melvin N. 1986. “The Black Extended Family: An Analytical Consideration.”

Developmental Psychology 22, 2: 246-258.

The History of African American Families

Berger, Alan S. and William Simon. 1974. “Black Families and the Moynihan Report: A

Research Evaluation.” Social Problems 22: 145-161.

Bloome, Deirdre and Christopher Muller. 2015. “Tenancy and African American Marriage in the

Postbellum South.” Demography 52:1409-30.

Fouquier, Katherine Ferrell. 2011. “The Concept of Motherhood Among Three Generations of African American Women.” Journal of Nursing Scholarship 43, 2: 145-53.

Frazier, E. Franklin.1939. “The Brown Middle Class.” Pp. 420-446 in The Negro Family in the

United States by E. F. Frazier. Chicago, IL: The University of Chicago Press.

Frazier, E. Franklin. 1948. “Ethnic Family Patterns: The Negro Family in the United States.”

American Journal of Sociology 53, 6: 435-438.

Kelley, Robin D. G. 1993. “’We Are Not What We Seem’: Rethinking Black Working-Class

Opposition in the Jim Crow South.” The Journal of American History 80, 1: 75-112.

Mumford, Kevin J. 2012. “Untangling Pathology: The Moynihan Report and Homosexual

Damage, 1965–1975.” The Journal of Policy History 24, 1: 53-73.

U.S. Department of Labor, Office of Policy and Planning. 1965. The Negro Family: The Case for

National Action (Moynihan Report). Washington, DC: U.S. Department of Labor, Office of

Policy and Planning.

African American Families in Contemporary Times

Carpenter, Tracy R. 2012. “Construction of the Crack Mother Icon.” Western Journal of Black

Studies 36, 4: 264-275.

Glass, Valerie Q. and April L. Few-Demo. 2013. “Complexities of Informal Social Support

Arrangements for Black Lesbian Couples.” Family Relations 62: 714 – 726.

Hunter, Andrea G. and James Earl Davis. 1992. “Constructing Gender: An Exploration of Afro-

American Men’s Conceptualization of Manhood.” Gender & Society 6, 3: 464-79.

Mays, Vickie M., Linda M. Chatters, Susan D. Cochran, and Joanna Mackness. 1998. “African

American Families in Diversity: Gay Men and Lesbians as Participants in Family Networks.”

Journal of Comparative Family Studies 29, 1: 73-87.

Patterson, Robert J. 2011. “’Woman Thou Art Bound’: Critical Spectatorship, Black Masculine

Gazes, and Gender Problems in Tyler Perry’s Movies.” Black Camera 3, 1: 9-30.

Reid, Megan and Andrew Golub.2015. “Vetting and Letting: Cohabiting Stepfamily Formation

Processes in Low-Income Black Families.” Journal of Marriage and Family 77: 1234–1249.

Roberts, Dorothy E. 2012. “Prison, Foster Care, and the Systemic Punishment of Black Mothers.”

UCLA Law Review 59, 6: 1474-1500.

Western, Bruce and Christopher Wildeman. 2009. “The Black Family and Mass Incarceration.”

The Annals of the American Academy of Political and Social Science 621, 1: 2

 
 

LAH 351M • Jerusalem And Athens

29785 • Dempsey, Erik
Meets MWF 2:00PM-3:00PM WAG 214
(also listed as CTI 375, GOV 379G)
show description

Examine the age-old confrontation between the teaching of the Bible and the politics and philosophy of the ancient Greeks.


LAH 352C • Germany In The 20th Century-Wb

29790 • Crew, David
Meets TTH 3:30PM-5:00PM • Internet
EGCWr
show description

Description: Hitler and the Nazis have given twentieth-century Germany a world-historical significance it would otherwise have lacked. Even from our vantage point, the Nazi regime is still one of the most dramatic and destructive episodes in western European, indeed, in world history. Nazism is synonymous with terror, concentration camps and mass murder. Hitler's war claimed the lives of tens of millions and left Europe in complete ruins. The danger resides in the temptation to view all of German history from the end of the nineteenth-century onwards as merely the pre-history of Nazism, thereby failing to deal with each period on its own terms. And what do we do with the more than half a century of German history since 1945? With the defeat of  Nazi Germany in 1945, the course of German history appears to have experienced a radical break. New political and social systems were imposed upon the two sides of the divided Germany by the victors. The hostilities of the Cold War appeared to ensure a permanent division of Germany, which in 1961 assumed a compelling symbolic form, the Berlin Wall. But in 1989, the dramatic changes in the Soviet Union and Eastern Europe revolutionized East Germany as well. The Berlin Wall came down, East and West Germany were once again joined together in one nation. What exactly this newest version of the German nation will look like in ten or twenty years is still unclear. 
In the first half of the course, we will begin by discussing the origins and effects of  World War One(1914-1918), then move on to the German Revolution(1918-1919) and the Weimar Republic(l9l8-l933), the Nazi regime (1933-1945) and the Holocaust. The questions we will focus on here are: Was Germany’s first experiment with democracy between 1918 and 1933 doomed to failure? What factors contributed to the rise of Nazism and how did the Nazi regime affect Germany and Europe? Were all vestiges of Nazism destroyed in 1945? In the second half of the semester we will discuss the history of  Germany in the Cold War(1945-1989). We will end by talking about the consequences of the end of the Cold War and the fall of the Berlin Wall (1989 to the present). Here, the main questions will be: Did, West and East Germany follow fundamentally new paths? What clues can be found in the histories of the Federal Republic in West Germany and the German Democratic Republic in East Germany since 1949 that may indicate the possibilities for change in the future? How has the unification of East and West Germany affected Germany's role in Europe and the world?
 
 
Required Reading:
Mary Fulbrook,The Divided Nation
Erich Maria Remarque, All Quiet on the Western Front
Richard Bessel(ed.) Life in the Third Reich
Primo Levi, Survival in Auschwitz
Peter Schneider, The Wall Jumper
We will be working extensively with materials on this site: http://germanhistorydocs.ghi-dc.org/
 
Assignments/Grading:
(1)Two longer essay assignments (each 6-8 pages typewritten, each worth 30% of your final grade) which ask you to think critically about some of the major issues in twentieth century German history.
(2)In addition to these two longer essay assignments, you will be asked to write one shorter essay (4-5 pages typewritten—worth 20% of the final grade) on any one of the books by  Remarque, Bessel, Levi, or Schneider.


Required Reading:
Mary Fulbrook,The Divided Nation
Erich Maria Remarque, All Quiet on the Western Front
Richard Bessel(ed.) Life in the Third Reich
Primo Levi, Survival in Auschwitz
Peter Schneider, The Wall Jumper
We will be working extensively with materials on this site: http://germanhistorydocs.ghi-dc.org/


Assignments/Grading:
(1)Two longer essay assignments (each 6-8 pages typewritten, each worth 30% of your final grade) which ask you to think critically about some of the major issues in twentieth century German history.
(2)In addition to these two longer essay assignments, you will be asked to write one shorter essay (4-5 pages typewritten—worth 20% of the final grade) on any one of the books by  Remarque, Bessel, Levi, or Schneider.


LAH 358Q • Supervised Research

29795
(also listed as HMN 358Q, WGS 358Q)
show description

Supervised Research. Individual instruction. Prerequisite: A
University grade point average of at least 3.50 and consent of the
liberal arts honors program adviser. Only one LAH 358Q may be applied towards college honors. Course may be repeated.


LAH 679TA • Honors Thesis

29800
(also listed as LAH 679TB)
show description

Restricted to Plan I majors in the College of Liberal Arts. Supervised research, reading, and writing of a substantial paper on an interdepartmental subject.


LAH 679TB • Honors Thesis

29805
IIWr (also listed as LAH 679TA)
show description

Restricted to Plan I majors in the College of Liberal Arts. Supervised research, reading, and writing of a substantial paper on an interdepartmental subject.