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Liberal Arts Honors

LAH 104H • Professional/Career Devel-Wb

30720 • Oldham, Tatem
Meets M 4:00PM-5:00PM • Internet
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This course is designed to help you identify your strengths and talents as a liberal arts honors student, learn to conduct an effective internship search, explore post-graduation options, create and manage a professional online brand and hone your professional skills. By the end of the course, you will have a targeted resume and cover letter, a professional LinkedIn profile, and the necessary tools to network, build your personal brand, and interview successfully.

 Course Goals:

  • Provide an open space where students can ask career questions, share experiences and learn in a group setting.
  • Identify your top strengths using the StrengthsQuest Assessment, transferrable skills and areas of expertise.
  • Explore your post-graduation options, whether that includes going directly into your career or preparing for graduate or law school.
    • Gain knowledge of career industries and narrow down your target career options.
    • Learn about graduate and professional school application processes and what you can do to prepare.
  • Create a targeted resume and cover letter ready to submit to internship opportunities.
  • Craft your liberal arts story to leverage your degree and experiences in the interview and in the workplace.
  • Review your online content and learn how to better promote your personal brand across social media platforms; Create and/or update your LinkedIn profile.
  • Create an “elevator pitch” to present your ideas in a clear and concise manner.
  • Learn how to effectively conduct an internship search and how to interview and network.
  • Learn business etiquette principals to help you succeed in a workplace or other professional environment.

Lectures will be combined with discussions, in-class exercises, small group activities, and independent activities and assignments. You are expected to complete a series of assignments in a timely manner, and to participate actively in class discussions.


LAH 149 • Scholars Honors Capstone

30735
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Description:

In this honors course, students will write paper(s) of substantial length to reflect upon their academic enrichment experience(s) while participating in the Liberal Arts Scholars Programs. Academic enrichment experiences that students may reflect upon include study abroad, internship, community service, leadership, or research. Students will work with a faculty mentor to write a paper that articulates what they learned from their academic enrichment experience and it impacted their views and career goals. Students will meet bimonthly with the course instructor for one hour to review progress on written work and share their reflections with classmates. 

Prerequisites: Upper Division standing, cumulative grade point average of at least 3.25. Department approval required for registration.

Grading Method: Letter Grade

Hours: 1

Restrictions: Restricted to Plan I majors in the College of Liberal Arts who are participants in the Liberal Arts Honors Scholars Program.


LAH 305 • Reacting To The Past-Wb

30725 • Casey, Julie
Meets TTH 9:30AM-11:00AM • Internet
EGCWr
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“Reacting to the Past” introduces freshmen to major philosophical ideas and texts, including the historical context in which these ideas acquired significance. Students read primary texts, adopt the personas and perspectives of historical figures, and re-enact policy debates to explore how facts and opinions shape collective decision-making in polarized political environments. Students also write six persuasive essays (4-5 pages each) to meet the UT writing flag requirement. Course themes include ethical leadership, the role of shared values in governance, the relationship of individuals to their community, and evolving concepts of citizenship.

Dr. Elon Lang's Reacting class on MWF games include The Threshold of Democracy: Athens in 403 B.C., Red Clay, 1835: Cherokee Removal and the Meaning of Sovereignty, and The Collapse of Apartheid and The Dawn of Democracy in South Africa, 1993.

In Professor Casey's class on TTH students will investigate the impact of(1) Socratic ideals of justice during the rise of democracy after the Peloponnesian War in Athens in 403 BCE; (2) Confucian ideals of morality and ethical leadership during the final years of the Ming Dynasty in China in 1587; and (3) Rousseau’s idea of collective governance–the Social Contract --during the French Revolution, 1791.

Each unit of study is presented as an elaborate role-playing game, designed and published by the Reacting to the Past National Consortium (https://reacting.barnard.edu/), with strict rules for the players and detailed guidelines for their debates. These games divide players into competing political parties with positions across the ideological spectrum, with each team striving to implement its own ideals for society. Players adopt both progressive and conservative political agendas – with a handful of students remaining “undecided,” open to persuasion by each team. Players will determine how best to attain their goals, though they will receive intellectual guidance from the classic texts and inspiration from the lives of the historical characters they are portraying.

For the first few sessions of each game, the class will meet in a traditional seminar format, where students will learn about the historical setting of the game and the philosophical issues that will animate the debates. After these introductory sessions to set the context for each game, the class will break into competing groups, as students with similar roles join forces to accomplish their objectives. Then, as debates begin, students will come to class in their character roles and will lead the sessions. The instructor takes on the role of “Game Master,” to ensure fair play, reminding students to honor the historical context of the game.
  
The heart of each game is persuasion: students must persuade the politically unaffiliated players that their team’s views make more sense than those of their opponents. They must draw upon rhetorical strategies and facts in their arguments, and learn strategies for presenting their positions with conviction and clarity. They must present their arguments in written form through persuasive essays, as well as delivering speeches and participating in open debates from their assigned viewpoints. Players learn to navigate extreme viewpoints and polarized political environments while trying to accomplish a common goal. In short, they learn to test the theories of government and leadership against their experience as politicians and leaders. After each game, players step out of their assigned roles as historical figures and come together again as modern-day students, discussing how their re-enactment did or did not mirror history. This “debriefing” session is often as important as the game itself in learning about history, the impact of philosophical ideas, and how citizens make decisions in polarized political situations.

LAH 305 • Reacting To The Past-Wb

30730 • Lang, Elon
Meets MWF 11:00AM-12:00PM • Internet
EGCWr
show description

“Reacting to the Past” introduces freshmen to major philosophical ideas and texts, including the historical context in which these ideas acquired significance. Students read primary texts, adopt the personas and perspectives of historical figures, and re-enact policy debates to explore how facts and opinions shape collective decision-making in polarized political environments. Students also write six persuasive essays (4-5 pages each) to meet the UT writing flag requirement. Course themes include ethical leadership, the role of shared values in governance, the relationship of individuals to their community, and evolving concepts of citizenship.

Dr. Elon Lang's Reacting class on MWF games include The Threshold of Democracy: Athens in 403 B.C., Red Clay, 1835: Cherokee Removal and the Meaning of Sovereignty, and The Collapse of Apartheid and The Dawn of Democracy in South Africa, 1993.

In Professor Casey's class on TTH students will investigate the impact of(1) Socratic ideals of justice during the rise of democracy after the Peloponnesian War in Athens in 403 BCE; (2) Confucian ideals of morality and ethical leadership during the final years of the Ming Dynasty in China in 1587; and (3) Rousseau’s idea of collective governance–the Social Contract --during the French Revolution, 1791.

Each unit of study is presented as an elaborate role-playing game, designed and published by the Reacting to the Past National Consortium (https://reacting.barnard.edu/), with strict rules for the players and detailed guidelines for their debates. These games divide players into competing political parties with positions across the ideological spectrum, with each team striving to implement its own ideals for society. Players adopt both progressive and conservative political agendas – with a handful of students remaining “undecided,” open to persuasion by each team. Players will determine how best to attain their goals, though they will receive intellectual guidance from the classic texts and inspiration from the lives of the historical characters they are portraying.

For the first few sessions of each game, the class will meet in a traditional seminar format, where students will learn about the historical setting of the game and the philosophical issues that will animate the debates. After these introductory sessions to set the context for each game, the class will break into competing groups, as students with similar roles join forces to accomplish their objectives. Then, as debates begin, students will come to class in their character roles and will lead the sessions. The instructor takes on the role of “Game Master,” to ensure fair play, reminding students to honor the historical context of the game.
  
The heart of each game is persuasion: students must persuade the politically unaffiliated players that their team’s views make more sense than those of their opponents. They must draw upon rhetorical strategies and facts in their arguments, and learn strategies for presenting their positions with conviction and clarity. They must present their arguments in written form through persuasive essays, as well as delivering speeches and participating in open debates from their assigned viewpoints. Players learn to navigate extreme viewpoints and polarized political environments while trying to accomplish a common goal. In short, they learn to test the theories of government and leadership against their experience as politicians and leaders. After each game, players step out of their assigned roles as historical figures and come together again as modern-day students, discussing how their re-enactment did or did not mirror history. This “debriefing” session is often as important as the game itself in learning about history, the impact of philosophical ideas, and how citizens make decisions in polarized political situations.

LAH 350 • Archiv Advacy:exper Learn

30740 • Lang, Elon
Meets TTH 12:30PM-2:00PM PAR 201 • Hybrid/Blended
(also listed as HMN 350)
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In this seminar, students will use digital archiving and exhibit-building techniques to amplify voices that actively promote social justice, cultural awareness, and service, and to test the ethical positions about impartiality and advocacy in archival and exhibit practices. Through a client-based service-project, students will work with an institutional or organizational stakeholder in the community that has materials or records that could provide a good subject for archival inquiry, preservation, and advocacy. Students will work closely with each other, their instructor, and the community stakeholders to access materials and records from the institution’s history, to learn the stakeholders’ goals and priorities for their project, to digitize and describe collections of their items, and to produce a public digital exhibit on selections from this collection in the platform Omeka. Their goal is to use an exhibit to situate the collection in the context of both the organization’s own history and a broader history of the community in which the organization is situated, and then to promote the Omeka site on behalf of the organization.

A key learning objective for the course is for students to explore the boundary between impartiality and advocacy in the telling of historical narratives about a subject in which a client organization has a vested interest, while also navigating the organization’s concerns about privacy and publicity. This experiential learning class will cultivate professional skills in client relations, information science, cultural outreach, media literacy, and web design—as well as teamwork, independent research, critical thinking, work ethic discipline, accountability, and creativity.

Required Texts and other Materials

Readings will be distributed via Canvas. Students will need a functioning computer with the ability to access the internet and do Zoom video conferences.


LAH 350 • Interpreting Black Rage-Wb

30745 • Jones, Brandon
Meets MWF 1:00PM-2:00PM • Internet
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The story of Black people in the United States has been one of struggle and resilience. James Baldwin once said: “To be a Negro in this country and to be relatively conscious is to be in a rage almost all the time.” This rage is evident in the writings of Baldwin or the films of present- day visionaries like Spike Lee. Expressions of rage can be heard in the vocals Nina Simone and in the fiery lyrics of Tupac Shakur. This state of rage also has manifested itself in the form of the Montgomery Bus Boycott, March on Washington, the Black Power Movement, and Black Lives Matter. Yet the question still remains, to some, “why are Black people so mad?” To answer this question, we will examine the residual effects of slavery and its impact on race relations in the U.S. We will also conduct a multimodal exploration of literature, music, and film that convey the sense of rage described by Baldwin. Lastly, we will critique and evaluate expressions of rage in contexts such as politics, media, and the academy.


LAH 350 • Lang Truths Myths Mysteries-Wb

30755 • Russi, Cinzia
Meets TTH 2:00PM-3:30PM • Internet
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“All languages share a set of common core structures, a ‘universal grammar’ built on innate brain mechanisms that foster and shape language learning”, “Does language structure affect speakers’ world view and thought?”, “Can animals talk?”, “Some languages are just not good enough”, “Italian is beautiful, German is ugly”, “Spanish is easier than Chinese”, “Women talk too much” are but some examples of enduring intellectual controversies and popular beliefs (‘myths’) about language that continue to fuel fervent discussion among language scholars. Inexplicable real-life events related to language have also been reported – such as the British woman who woke up one day and started to speak with a French accent, or the Croatian girl who awoke from a coma and could no longer speak or understand her native language but was fluent in German – which have may been viewed with skepticism or even stirred stark criticism and have certainly sparked burning curiosity in the general public. Also, language has often been attributed magical powers and put to magical uses (curses, charms, divinations).

  • Aims and objectives
  • After an introductory characterization of language and linguistics, we will proceed to identify long-lasting controversial issues and common viewpoints about language and puzzling real-life language-related phenomena, students will critically appraise them through a reasoned, rigorous confrontation of facts and fallacies with the objective of competently articulating defensible conclusions on their own.
  • By means of a discerning evaluation of complex issues, enlightened by facts and principled theory, rather than relying on received wisdom and anecdotes, students will provide informed answers to questions as the following:
  • Is language independent of, or related to, other aspects of our mental lives?
  • When did language emerge and how?
  • What can song and other animal vocal behaviors tell us about the evolution of speech?
  • Can languages be good or bad, beautiful or ugly? Logical or primitive? Are there easy and difficult languages?
  • How can brain damage affect language? Who are language savants and what can we learn from them about the language and the nature of the human mind?
  • Does language have supernatural powers or does it simply have the power we attribute to it?

 


LAH 350 • Paper Chase: Lw Sch/Life Lw

30800 • Levy, Mark
Meets TTH 8:00AM-9:30AM SZB 296
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For generations, every first-year law student has been taught to “think like a lawyer.” By examining the fundamental elements of the law as contoured by seminal case law, law students not only learn the basic tenets of legal theory, but also begin to internalize how the law touches all aspects of our society. The law does not simply provide for an outcome in a specific lawsuit, it provides our language for understanding culture, history, government, and business, just as mythology shapes the language of literature or the Bible or Koran shape the language of religion.  

In this course, we will explore the liberal arts through the lens of the first-year law school experience and the first-year law school experience through the lens of the liberal arts. We will read literature that melds the reality of imprisonment with the fantasy of kangaroo courts. We will watch how the law is presented for public consumption to analyze if it still resembles its blackletter origin. We will examine how legal decisions affect economic markets, from the micro to the macro. And we will learn how lawyers apply these principles in daily practice.     

Readings (all or a portion of the following texts) 

Arthur Miller: The Crucible

Franz Kafka: The Trial

John Nichols: The Milagro Beanfield War

Edward Larson: Summer for the Gods 

Viewings

Selections from “The Paper Chase,” “Law & Order,” “A Civil Action,” and “My Cousin Vinny”


LAH 350 • Pope Francis's Cath Church-Ita

30765 • Theriault, Sean
(also listed as GOV 355M, T C 358)
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This course, taking place in Rome, focuses upon the history and politics of papal succession and church policy. Specifically, we will concentrate on Pope Francis, the Holy See, the Vatican, and the world that it serves. The course will introduce, describe, and analyze how the Church makes its decisions and why. Each student is expected to do all the readings before the class meeting –a good classroom conversation and a student’s good grade depends upon it. This course will have a regular classroom schedule in addition to Rome schedule where we tour the great churches, meet with the Princes of the Church, and observe the church’s influence. In total, students will develop an understanding of the church as a historical, religious, and political organization.

Additional prerequisite: Concurrent enrollment in L A 119.
Restricted to students in the Maymester Abroad Program; contact Study
Abroad for permission to register for this class. Class meets May 26,
20-June 18. Taught in Rome, Italy. Students must consult with Study
Abroad Program Coordinator as travel and orientation dates may be in
addition to these dates.

Texts/Readings:

Mitch Finley. 2005. Key Moments in Church History: A Concise Introduction to the Catholic Church. Roman & Littlefield.John-Peter Pham. 2006. Heirs of the Fisherman: Behind the Scenes of Papal Death and Succession. Oxford University Press.John L. Allen, Jr. 2015. The Francis Miracle: Inside the Transformation of the Pope and the Church. Time: New York.John L. Allen, Jr. 2006. All the Pope’s Men: The Inside Story of How the Vatican Really Thinks. Doubleday: New York.oA course packet sent via email before leaving for Rome. All readings in the Course Packet are designated as a hollow circle.

Assignments:

Grades will be determined according to the following formula:

40%Attendance, Class Participation, and Homework Assignments. Throughout the class students will have attendance quizzes and, perhaps, homework assignments. There will be no excuses for missing attendance quizzes and no extensions will be given on homework assignments. Additionally, I will take attendance for our out-of-class meetings and tours. Students must attend these or their grade will suffer.

50%Semester Project. This paper will be an examination of an aspect of St. Francis’s Church that utilizes course information, the historic setting, and the tours/meetings to gain an additional insight to how the church functions and why.

10%Presentation on Semester Project.


LAH 350 • Rhtoric Of Grt Speechs-Wb

30795 • Carver, Larry
Meets TTH 11:00AM-12:30PM • Internet
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THE RHETORIC OF GREAT SPEECHES IN HISTORY 

Professor Larry Carver

Telephone: 512 478-8968

E-mail: carver@austin.utexas.edu

Office Hours: On Zoom, hours to be decided

                                               

he sent me along with you to teach you of all these matters,

to make you a speaker of words and one who [is] accomplished in action.                                                                                                 Phoinix to Achilleus

 

            But when they spun their appeals before us all,

            Menelaus spoke out quickly--his words racing,

            few but clear as a bell, nothing long-winded

            or off the mark, though in fact the man was younger.

            But when Odysseus spring up, the famed tactician

            would just stand there, staring down, hard,

            his eyes fixed on the ground,

            never shifting his scepter back and forth,

            clutching it stiff and still like a mindless man.

            You'd think him a sullen fellow or just plain fool.

            But when he let loose that great voice from his chest

            and the words came piling on like a driving winter blizzard--

            then no man alive could rival Odysseus!  Odysseus…

            we no longer gazed in wonder at his looks.

                                                                                                Priam to Helen

 

            You come of good stock, lad. That was well-spoken.

                                                                                                Meneláos to Telémakhos

 

                                                            And I can tell you,

            in every council before Troy thereafter

            your son spoke first and always to the point;

            no one but Nestor and I could out-debate him.

            And when we formed against the Trojan line

            he never hung back in the mass, but ranged

            far forward of his troops--no man could touch him

            for gallantry. 

                                                                                                Odysseus to Achilleus

            

This course has several goals: (1) to learn about the nature and history of rhetoric; (2) to introduce ourselves, or reintroduce ourselves, to some of the great speeches of the Western tradition; (3) in carrying out goals one and two, to learn a good deal of history; (4) to hone your writing skills; and (5) to convert you—if not converted already—into a life long student of speeches. 

 

The course opens by tracing the ancient Greek ideal that the hero must be accomplished on the battlefield as well as in the assembly, a doer of deeds but also a speaker of words. We will read and analyze speeches from The Iliad and Odyssey as well as those from Xenophon and Thucydides, Plato, and Euripides. Along the way, we will learn about the art of rhetoric.  Following a brief look at the place of rhetoric in the Roman Republic and early empire, we will continue our study of rhetoric by focusing on the "Gettysburg Address," an astonishing 272 words that William Safire considers "the best short speech since the Sermon on the Mount."

Having then acquired the proper tools, we will read famous, and perhaps not so famous, speeches, literary and historical, from the Renaissance forward, from Henry V's St. Crispin Day speech to those by Churchill, President Kennedy, and President Reagan.

 

For writing assignments, we will analyze speeches but also write speeches; and we will, given the proper occasion, listen to speeches. As a final assignment, I am thinking of asking you, after we have studied various examples, of writing the University’s or College’s spring commencement speech, 2021.

 

TEXTS:  Winston Churchill, Blood, Toil, Tears, and Sweat: The Great Speeches, ed. by David Cannadine (Penguin Classics, 1989); Edward P.J. Corbett, Classical Rhetoric for the Modern Student (Oxford University Press, 1999, Fourth Edition); William Safire, Lend Me Yours Ears: Great Speeches in History (Norton, Updated and Expanded,2004); and Gary Wills, Lincoln at Gettysburg (Simon & Schuster,1992).

 

GRADING: Grades will be based on: (1) careful preparation of each day's readings; (2) regular attendance and participation (missing more than 3 classes will lower your grade by one full grade); (3) several short, one- to two-page, papers; (4) a five- to ten-page analysis of a speech; and (5) the final paper assignment. 

 

UNIVERSITY POLICY: "The University of Austin provides upon request

appropriate academic accommodations for qualified students with disabilities. For more information, contact the Office of the Dean of Students at 471- 6259, 471-6441 TTY

 

 


LAH 350 • Soc Ineq & Health In U.s.

30775 • Musick, Marc
Meets TTH 12:30PM-2:00PM BUR 220 • Hybrid/Blended
(also listed as SOC 321K)
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Course Description

This course examines patterns of health and illness in the US and their possible causes. By focusing on societal structures and demographic trends, the course is able to uncover the ways in which American society and social interactions shape health outcomes across the adult population. Some attention in the course is also devoted to the healthcare system in the US and the ways in which it leads to certain population health outcomes. The course is designed with experiential learning in mind, thus it requires students to undertake projects that help them better understand how health outcomes are patterned in the community around UT Austin.

Experiential Learning Component

A major focus of the course is engaging students through experiential learning. Although the course will contain lectures, much of it will rely on the students to generate content and engage in academic activity outside of the classroom. The main portions of this part of the class revolve around three activities: a group research project; presentation and discussion of an article related to the course content; and engagement in a simulation of a historic moment in the health history of the United States. Through these active learning mechanisms, the hope is that students will gain much more from the class than a class that engages them primarily through lectures.


LAH 350 • Tech Change/Financ Crisis

30790 • Galbraith, James
Meets W 3:00PM-6:00PM WEL 1.308
(also listed as T C 358)
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Description:

This is a class about the modern economic world: a world of change and instability, of bubble and bust, euphoria and depression.  It is a world driven by technology on one side and finance on the other -- and  increasingly aware of the larger geophysical environment.   Economics -- as a broad subject -- has not done a very good job of coping  with this world.  But some economists and other observers have, and here we  focus on the Keynesian, institutionalist and structuralist traditions,  mainly in 20th century economics. We will pick a number of major texts, and  a few minor ones, read them, and try to relate them to the issues of our  time.   This class is a seminar. It is not a lecture course. You are expected to  read material fully in advance. Come well prepared to discuss it and to  answer my questions.  Some of the readings are long. Search for the  important parts, skim the rest, but don’t forget to slow down and enjoy  some of the digressions.

Required Texts/Readings:

Veblen:  Theory of Business Enterprise, or possibly Theory of the Leisure Class.

Imperial Germany. Schumpeter:  Capitalism, Socialism and Democracy

Keynes:  Economic Consequences of the Peace, Essays in Persuasion, General Theory

Ayres: Theory of Economic Progress

Galbraith:  The New Industrial State. Galbraith (fils):  The Predator State

Course Requirements:

The course will require detailed attention to readings, including notes that I will review on a weekly basis, and two papers, one short and one longer. Grading will be based

25% on notes

25% on class discussion

15% on the short paper

35% on the final paper

Instructor Biography:

James K. Galbraith holds the Lloyd M. Bentsen Jr. Chair in Government/Business Relations and a professorship of Government at the Lyndon B. Johnson School of Public Affairs, The University of Texas at Austin. He holds degrees from Harvard and Yale (Ph.D. in economics, 1981).

He studied as a Marshall Scholar at King's College, Cambridge in 1974-1975, and then served in several positions on the staff of the U.S. Congress, including executive director of the Joint Economic Committee. He directed the LBJ School's Ph.D. Program in Public Policy from 1995 to 1997. He directs the University of Texas Inequality Project, an informal research group based at the LBJ School.

Galbraith's new book is Inequality and Instability: A Study of the World Economy Just Before the Great Crisis(Oxford University Press, 2012). Previous books include The Predator State: How Conservatives Abandoned the Free Market and Why Liberals Should Too(Free Press, 2008),Created Unequal: The Crisis in American Pay(Free Press, 1998) and Balancing Acts: Technology, Finance and the American Future(Basic Books, 1989).Inequality and Industrial Change: A Global View(Cambridge University Press, 2001), is co-edited with Maureen Berner. He has co-authored two textbooks, The Economic Problem with the late Robert L. Heilbroner and Macroeconomics with William Darity, Jr. He is a managing editor of Structural Change and Economic Dynamics.

Galbraith is a member of the Lincean Academy, the oldest honorary scientific society in the world. He is a senior scholar of the Levy Economics Institute and chair of the Board of Economists for Peace and Security, a global professional network. He writes frequently for policy magazines and the general press.


LAH 351D • Ethical Issues In Med/Society

30805 • Brown, Virginia
Meets TTH 2:00PM-3:30PM UTC 1.118 • Hybrid/Blended
EWr
show description

Description:

This course takes a critical approach in understanding, analyzing, and evaluating health and health care in the 21st century.  Students will develop an understanding of 1.) the social factors at play in relation to disease and illness, 2.) the rise of the medical industrial complex, 3.) while learning how issues of power underlie ethical dilemmas in both medicine and society.  Students will be introduced to the theory and application of Principalism in order to develop a foundation in ethical reasoning. Through course readings, interactive lectures, special guest lectures, and case analysis, students will be able to recognize and develop a response to ethical issues confronting individuals, communities and clinicians alike.  

Reading:

The Sociology of Health, Illness & Health Care, 7th Edition, Rose Weitz, and

Principles of Biomedical Ethics, 13th Edition, Tom L. Beachamp and James F. Childress (selected chapters)

 


LAH 351E • Gender Equality In World Devel

30810 • Hunter, Wendy
Meets M 2:00PM-5:00PM PAR 203
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This course will examine the causes and consequences of gender equality and inequality in the world. We will begin by taking stock of gender equality (identifying where the most and least progress has occurred), and then proceed to analyze the causal links between women’s empowerment and development.  Women will be seen as key decision-makers in their households, as well as important agents of development in their countries. In regions where women have advanced the most, what have been the conditions and policies that have supported their rise, and how has women’s empowerment contributed to household and national development? In regions where women have advanced the least, why have such strong gender inequalities persisted, and how has household and national progress been impeded as a result? In the latter (suboptimal) scenario, what can be done about the existing state of affairs? We will examine an array of policy options and innovations that have been designed and implemented to lift the prospects of women in the Global South, and also consider the domestic and international support for such policies.  The reforms under analysis aim to lift the human capital and welfare of women (e.g. education and health services), as well as make women more competitive in the labor market and powerful in institutions of governance.  We will examine reforms that affect women over the course of the life cycle: childhood, the reproductive years, and old age.  A key theme will be that effective policies take into account specific gender considerations.  Focusing on the Global South, we will draw on examples from various countries.   

Key readings will include the following:  

Nicholas D. Kristof and Sheryl WuDunn.  2009. Half the Sky:  Turning Oppression into Opportunity for Women Worldwide.   New York:  Random House.   

World Bank.  World Development Report.  2012.  Gender Equality and Development.  Washington, D.C. World Bank Publications.  

United Nations.  2016.  Progress of the World’s Women, 2015-2016.   New York:  United Nations.

For the section of the course on women and health care, we will draw amply from publications culled and archived by the T.H. Chan School of Public Health, Harvard University.   For the section on women and education, we will make significant use of studies done by World Bank researchers.  Readings on issues affecting elderly women, such as old age pensions, will come primarily from the non-governmental organization, HelpAge International. 

 

 


LAH 351G • Reactg To Revolutnry Ideas-Wb

30815 • Mayhew, Linda
Meets MW 11:00AM-12:30PM • Internet
EGCWr (also listed as REE 335)
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This course will use the popular “Reacting to the Past” curriculum to introduce students to the philosophical ideas and texts surrounding revolutions through historical role-playing.  We will explore pre-revolutionary Russia using the game “Literary Journals, Dostoevsky and Tolstoy in St. Petersburg, 1877”and then move forward in time to a revolution in progress, playing “Mexico in Revolution, 1912-1920.”  We will take an interdisciplinary approach in both games, considering ideal of justice, equality, art, and the use of violence in connection with revolution. 

In 1877 Saint Petersburg, we will consider the pre-revolutionary debate under Tsar Aleksandr II between those seeking to preserve Russia’s cultural, religious, political traditions and those calling for reforms to the current system.  Our game will focus on how these opposing perspectives play out among the intelligentsia and in the popular literary journals of the time.  Editors of literary journals will seek out aesthetically pleasing works, while also publishing a variety of non-fiction articles, sometimes carrying political subtexts designed to escape the attention of censors.  To create a successful journal, they must uphold their political agenda while competing for the work of popular writers, such as Dostoevsky and Tolstoy.  Writers will contend for publication space in literary journals amidst the intellectual divides between Westernizers, Slavophiles, and Populists. As players – writers, editors, censors, and secret police – consider the role of literature in society, they will also debate political issues such as the Tsar and the monarchy, social classes and peasants, religion and the Russian Orthodox Church, and the role of women and the family in society.  The most successful journals will shape Russia’s literary and political future.

Our Mexico in Revolution, 1912-1920 game will explore similar issues in a different context, transporting players to tumultuous Mexico City during the Revolution. Although the game begins in March of 1912, Mexico has been at varying levels of chaos and instability since Francisco I. Madero called for revolution in November 1910. Porfirio Diaz, long-standing president (some say dictator) of Mexico, was forced into exile in May of 1911, and Madero has been in the office of the presidency since November of that year. The country is far from stable, as Madero's ability to rule effectively has been questioned and undermined--by foreigners and Mexicans alike--from the day he took office. Even some who rallied behind his cry of "Effective suffrage, no reelection" have begun to criticize him and question his dedication to his campaign promises, such as land reform. Amidst the violence and chaos of the Revolution, players will grapple with socio-political ideologies such as Comtian Positivism, Social Darwinism, Agrarianism, Anarchism, Social Catholicism, Feminism, and Liberalism as they make decisions concerning federal versus state government power, land reform, labor reform, suffrage, women's rights, religious reform, foreign investment, and education reform. Throughout the process of negotiating Mexico's future, they must keep the questions of how to establish a national identity (relative to cultural and historic memory) and stabilize the country. 

This class will require you to participate actively in debates, defending your character’s perspective (even if you disagree with it) and questioning the values of your opponents.  

TEXTS:           

For the Dostoevsky and Tolstoy Game:

  1. Mayhew, Literary Journals, Dostoevsky and Tolstoy in St. Petersburg, 1877 [Referred to as the “Game Book;” available as a course packet from the printer)
  2. Dostoevsky, The Brothers Karamazov, trans. Richard Pevear and Larissa Volokhonsky (You MUST use this translation!)
  3. Tolstoy, Anna Karenina, Rosamund Bartlett (You MUST use this translation!) 

For the Mexican Revolution Game:

  1. Truitt and Slaughter, Mexican Revolution, 1912 – 1920 [Referred to as the “Game Book;” available as a course packet from the printer)

 


LAH 351O • Data Anlytcs In Cntem Scty-Wb

30820 • Freels, Jeffrey
Meets T 11:00AM-12:30PM • Internet
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COURSE DESCRIPTION

Investigation of the influence of data analytics in contemporary society. Explores how data is generated and presented in various forms of media. A component of the class involves individual research on a chosen topic and presentation of findings via an oral presentation, video, or other medium. This course is appropriate for students with little to no background in statistics and/or data analysis.

Students will select a topic area to explore for the semester. The only criterion for determining the topic area is that it must involve a field in which data is regularly reported in various media (e.g., popular, scholarly, trade, or professional). Students will report on how data is generated, reported, and acted upon in that field through a synthesis paper and an oral or audio-visual presentation to the class. 

COURSE OUTCOMES

Upon successful completion of this course, students will be able to:

  • Define analytics and describe its impact on society
  • Interpret basic statistical data
  • Identify opportunities, challenges, and risks in the use of analytics in society
  • Evaluate data-driven source material in the student’s chosen topic area
  • Effectively communicate how data are used and reported on in the student’s chosen topic area

REQUIRED TEXTS

  • Silver, Nate (2015). The Signal and the Noise: Why So Many Predictions Fail--but Some Don’t. New York, NY: Penguin Books.
  • Wheelan, Charles (2014). Naked Statistics: Stripping the Dread from the Data. New York: W. W. Norton & Company.
  • Other media as assigned – full reading list below and in Canvas 

REQUIRED TECHNOLOGY

  • All students must complete and/or submit assignments through Canvas, the university’s online learning management system

 


LAH 358Q • Supervised Research

30830
(also listed as HMN 358Q, WGS 358Q)
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Supervised Research. Individual instruction. Prerequisite: A
University grade point average of at least 3.50 and consent of the
liberal arts honors program adviser. Only one LAH 358Q may be applied towards college honors. Course may be repeated.


LAH 679TA • Honors Thesis

30835
(also listed as LAH 679TB)
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Restricted to Plan I majors in the College of Liberal Arts. Supervised research, reading, and writing of a substantial paper on an interdepartmental subject.


LAH 679TB • Honors Thesis

30840
IIWr (also listed as LAH 679TA)
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Restricted to Plan I majors in the College of Liberal Arts. Supervised research, reading, and writing of a substantial paper on an interdepartmental subject.