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Liberal Arts Honors

LAH 102H • The Idea Of The Liberal Arts

31060 • Musick, Marc
Meets M 4:00PM-5:30PM GAR 0.102
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Restricted to students in the Freshman Honors Program in the College of Liberal Arts. An overview of the liberal arts disciplines.

Offered on the pass/fail basis only.


LAH 112H • The Nature Of Inquiry

31080 • Brown, Virginia
Meets W 2:00PM-3:00PM PAI 3.02
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Humans have an innate desire to investigate and to understand the unknown. Yet, we all differ in how we seek that understanding. So, how can we have confidence in the new knowledge that other people produce? Confidence is generated by the systematic use of research methods appropriate to the area of discovery. In this course, we will explore these different ways of knowing through examining the research methodologies used across disciplines in the College of Liberal Arts. LAH 112H: The Nature of Inquiry is designed for Liberal Arts Honors students in the spring semester of their sophomore year to gain an overview of the different types of research that can be done in Liberal Arts. The course will consist of guest lecturers, in-class exercises, brief required readings, and writing assignments.

 


LAH 305 • Reacting To The Past

31065 • Lang, Elon
Meets TTH 9:30AM-11:00AM GAR 0.128
EGCWr
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“Reacting to the Past” introduces freshmen to major philosophical ideas and texts, including the historical context in which these ideas acquired significance. Students read primary texts, adopt the personas and perspectives of historical figures, and re-enact policy debates to explore how facts and opinions shape collective decision-making in polarized political environments. Students also write six persuasive essays (4-5 pages each) to meet the UT writing flag requirement. Course themes include ethical leadership, the role of shared values in governance, the relationship of individuals to their community, and evolving concepts of citizenship.

Dr. Elon Lang's Reacting class on MWF games include The Threshold of Democracy: Athens in 403 B.C., Red Clay, 1835: Cherokee Removal and the Meaning of Sovereignty, and The Collapse of Apartheid and The Dawn of Democracy in South Africa, 1993.

In Professor Casey's class on TTH students will investigate the impact of(1) Socratic ideals of justice during the rise of democracy after the Peloponnesian War in Athens in 403 BCE; (2) Confucian ideals of morality and ethical leadership during the final years of the Ming Dynasty in China in 1587; and (3) Rousseau’s idea of collective governance–the Social Contract --during the French Revolution, 1791.

Each unit of study is presented as an elaborate role-playing game, designed and published by the Reacting to the Past National Consortium (https://reacting.barnard.edu/), with strict rules for the players and detailed guidelines for their debates. These games divide players into competing political parties with positions across the ideological spectrum, with each team striving to implement its own ideals for society. Players adopt both progressive and conservative political agendas – with a handful of students remaining “undecided,” open to persuasion by each team. Players will determine how best to attain their goals, though they will receive intellectual guidance from the classic texts and inspiration from the lives of the historical characters they are portraying.

For the first few sessions of each game, the class will meet in a traditional seminar format, where students will learn about the historical setting of the game and the philosophical issues that will animate the debates. After these introductory sessions to set the context for each game, the class will break into competing groups, as students with similar roles join forces to accomplish their objectives. Then, as debates begin, students will come to class in their character roles and will lead the sessions. The instructor takes on the role of “Game Master,” to ensure fair play, reminding students to honor the historical context of the game.
  
The heart of each game is persuasion: students must persuade the politically unaffiliated players that their team’s views make more sense than those of their opponents. They must draw upon rhetorical strategies and facts in their arguments, and learn strategies for presenting their positions with conviction and clarity. They must present their arguments in written form through persuasive essays, as well as delivering speeches and participating in open debates from their assigned viewpoints. Players learn to navigate extreme viewpoints and polarized political environments while trying to accomplish a common goal. In short, they learn to test the theories of government and leadership against their experience as politicians and leaders. After each game, players step out of their assigned roles as historical figures and come together again as modern-day students, discussing how their re-enactment did or did not mirror history. This “debriefing” session is often as important as the game itself in learning about history, the impact of philosophical ideas, and how citizens make decisions in polarized political situations.

LAH 305 • Reacting To The Past

31070 • Casey, Julie
Meets MWF 10:00AM-11:00AM SZB 3.802
EGCWr
show description

“Reacting to the Past” introduces freshmen to major philosophical ideas and texts, including the historical context in which these ideas acquired significance. Students read primary texts, adopt the personas and perspectives of historical figures, and re-enact policy debates to explore how facts and opinions shape collective decision-making in polarized political environments. Students also write six persuasive essays (4-5 pages each) to meet the UT writing flag requirement. Course themes include ethical leadership, the role of shared values in governance, the relationship of individuals to their community, and evolving concepts of citizenship.

Dr. Elon Lang's Reacting class on MWF games include The Threshold of Democracy: Athens in 403 B.C., Red Clay, 1835: Cherokee Removal and the Meaning of Sovereignty, and The Collapse of Apartheid and The Dawn of Democracy in South Africa, 1993.

In Professor Casey's class on TTH students will investigate the impact of(1) Socratic ideals of justice during the rise of democracy after the Peloponnesian War in Athens in 403 BCE; (2) Confucian ideals of morality and ethical leadership during the final years of the Ming Dynasty in China in 1587; and (3) Rousseau’s idea of collective governance–the Social Contract --during the French Revolution, 1791.

Each unit of study is presented as an elaborate role-playing game, designed and published by the Reacting to the Past National Consortium (https://reacting.barnard.edu/), with strict rules for the players and detailed guidelines for their debates. These games divide players into competing political parties with positions across the ideological spectrum, with each team striving to implement its own ideals for society. Players adopt both progressive and conservative political agendas – with a handful of students remaining “undecided,” open to persuasion by each team. Players will determine how best to attain their goals, though they will receive intellectual guidance from the classic texts and inspiration from the lives of the historical characters they are portraying.

For the first few sessions of each game, the class will meet in a traditional seminar format, where students will learn about the historical setting of the game and the philosophical issues that will animate the debates. After these introductory sessions to set the context for each game, the class will break into competing groups, as students with similar roles join forces to accomplish their objectives. Then, as debates begin, students will come to class in their character roles and will lead the sessions. The instructor takes on the role of “Game Master,” to ensure fair play, reminding students to honor the historical context of the game.
  
The heart of each game is persuasion: students must persuade the politically unaffiliated players that their team’s views make more sense than those of their opponents. They must draw upon rhetorical strategies and facts in their arguments, and learn strategies for presenting their positions with conviction and clarity. They must present their arguments in written form through persuasive essays, as well as delivering speeches and participating in open debates from their assigned viewpoints. Players learn to navigate extreme viewpoints and polarized political environments while trying to accomplish a common goal. In short, they learn to test the theories of government and leadership against their experience as politicians and leaders. After each game, players step out of their assigned roles as historical figures and come together again as modern-day students, discussing how their re-enactment did or did not mirror history. This “debriefing” session is often as important as the game itself in learning about history, the impact of philosophical ideas, and how citizens make decisions in polarized political situations.

LAH 305 • Reacting To The Past

31075 • Casey, Julie
Meets TTH 11:00AM-12:30PM SZB 2.814
EGCWr
show description

“Reacting to the Past” introduces freshmen to major philosophical ideas and texts, including the historical context in which these ideas acquired significance. Students read primary texts, adopt the personas and perspectives of historical figures, and re-enact policy debates to explore how facts and opinions shape collective decision-making in polarized political environments. Students also write six persuasive essays (4-5 pages each) to meet the UT writing flag requirement. Course themes include ethical leadership, the role of shared values in governance, the relationship of individuals to their community, and evolving concepts of citizenship.

Dr. Elon Lang's Reacting class on MWF games include The Threshold of Democracy: Athens in 403 B.C., Red Clay, 1835: Cherokee Removal and the Meaning of Sovereignty, and The Collapse of Apartheid and The Dawn of Democracy in South Africa, 1993.

In Professor Casey's class on TTH students will investigate the impact of(1) Socratic ideals of justice during the rise of democracy after the Peloponnesian War in Athens in 403 BCE; (2) Confucian ideals of morality and ethical leadership during the final years of the Ming Dynasty in China in 1587; and (3) Rousseau’s idea of collective governance–the Social Contract --during the French Revolution, 1791.

Each unit of study is presented as an elaborate role-playing game, designed and published by the Reacting to the Past National Consortium (https://reacting.barnard.edu/), with strict rules for the players and detailed guidelines for their debates. These games divide players into competing political parties with positions across the ideological spectrum, with each team striving to implement its own ideals for society. Players adopt both progressive and conservative political agendas – with a handful of students remaining “undecided,” open to persuasion by each team. Players will determine how best to attain their goals, though they will receive intellectual guidance from the classic texts and inspiration from the lives of the historical characters they are portraying.

For the first few sessions of each game, the class will meet in a traditional seminar format, where students will learn about the historical setting of the game and the philosophical issues that will animate the debates. After these introductory sessions to set the context for each game, the class will break into competing groups, as students with similar roles join forces to accomplish their objectives. Then, as debates begin, students will come to class in their character roles and will lead the sessions. The instructor takes on the role of “Game Master,” to ensure fair play, reminding students to honor the historical context of the game.
  
The heart of each game is persuasion: students must persuade the politically unaffiliated players that their team’s views make more sense than those of their opponents. They must draw upon rhetorical strategies and facts in their arguments, and learn strategies for presenting their positions with conviction and clarity. They must present their arguments in written form through persuasive essays, as well as delivering speeches and participating in open debates from their assigned viewpoints. Players learn to navigate extreme viewpoints and polarized political environments while trying to accomplish a common goal. In short, they learn to test the theories of government and leadership against their experience as politicians and leaders. After each game, players step out of their assigned roles as historical figures and come together again as modern-day students, discussing how their re-enactment did or did not mirror history. This “debriefing” session is often as important as the game itself in learning about history, the impact of philosophical ideas, and how citizens make decisions in polarized political situations.

LAH 340L • Legal Internships

31085 • Levy, Mark
Meets T 5:00PM-6:30PM PAR 204
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This class is designed to have an experiential learning component.

America’s laws, lawyers, and courts have charted and changed the course of American history. In our classroom discussions and readings, we will explore the role of lawyers and how the practice of law has shaped American society. As a component of Liberal Arts Frontiers, students in the Legal Internships clinic will also intern in law offices or legal settings and meet weekly in class to discuss and learn from each student-intern’s experience. The hands-on experience students gain in their public service internships will help shape our classroom discussions, from topics including legal ethics and professional development to legislative oversight and settlement negotiations. Students will learn about the practice of law and how lawyers serve the public interest while gaining practical experience and first-hand knowledge of different legal fields. 

The cornerstone of the Legal Internships clinic will be your participation as a student-intern in a legal, public policy, judicial, or legislative office. While help will be provided to select your internship before the semester begins, the final choice of where you work will be yours. The role you choose should be discussed and decided upon with your host supervisor and the course instructor. Examples of suitable host agencies include the Office of the Attorney General, the Travis County District Attorney’s Office, Texas Rio Grande Legal Aid, the Texas Public Policy Foundation, RAICES, the Office of Capital and Forensic Writs, judicial chambers, or a legislator’s office. Private legal offices are not eligible to host interns. 

Students should have their host agency selected and approved before the semester begin. 

Course Bibliography: 

Case law from the Supreme Court of the United States and Circuit Courts of Appeal, as well as scholarly articles from various law journals.

Floyd Abrams: “The Soul of the First Amendment”

Erwin Chemerinsky: “Federal Jurisdiction” (Seventh Edition)

Angela Davis: “Arbitrary Justice: The Power of the American Prosecutor”

John Hart Ely: “Democracy and Distrust: A Theory of Judicial Review”

Wortham, Scherr, Maurer, and Brooks: “Learning from Practice” 

Assignments and Grading Policy: 

The Legal Internships clinic will be graded on a +/- system. The breakdown of those grades will be on a 3-4-3 basis. For example:

100-93: A       82-80: B-

92-90: A-        …

89-87: B+       …

86-83: B         62-60: D- 

Students will be required to intern for a minimum of 9 hours per week, for 12 weeks during the semester. Students will also be required by their host supervisor to complete at least one written assignment while at their internship. Successful completion of the internship portion of the course will be ultimately decided upon by your host supervisor and the course instructor. 

Students will also be required to complete journaling exercises for class reflecting on their internship work, complete at least one written report summarizing your internship (with due respect for confidentiality concerns), and participate in classroom discussions. 

Guest Lecturers: 

Guest lecturers will visit our class to highlight various specialized areas of the law, including employment law, criminal law, and disability rights. 

How to Apply 

Application: This course has a two-step application process. The application deadline is September 3, 2021, at noon. Start the application by completing Part I of the application at https://liberalarts.utexas.edu/lahonors/programs/experiential-learning.php.

Once Part I has been approved, you will be emailed Part II. The second part of the application includes a learning agreement to be filled out electronically by you and your internship supervisor. Once you have completed both Parts I and II, LAH advisors will manually add you to the course. 

Student Eligibility: Liberal Arts Honors majors with 60+ credit hours and a GPA of 3.5 or higher are eligible to apply. 

Internship Requirements & Eligibility 

Internship Host Eligibility: To be eligible for this course, the internship host agency must be a law-related nonprofit organization, government legal office, judicial chambers, or legislative office. Examples of suitable host agencies include the Office of the Attorney General, the Travis County District or County Attorney's Office, Texas Rio Grande Legal Aid, the Texas Public Policy Foundation, Texas Appleseed, judicial chambers, or a legislator's office. Private legal offices are not eligible to host interns for this course.

Internship eligibility is reviewed on a case by case basis; however, in addition to the criteria above, the internship must (1) provide direct and daily supervision and guidance; (2) provide regular access to the supervisor; (3) assign meaningful projects; and (4) provide a professional, established working environment with a strong learning component (home-office sites, shared  or co-working sites, virtual/work from home or "in the field" internships are not eligible for the course). 

Internship Hours: In addition to the hours spent in class, interns are required to complete a minimum of 9 hours at the internship site for a minimum of 12 weeks between the first and last class days of the semester. 

Internship Search Assistance 

Liberal Arts Career Services provides a number of resources and programs designed to help you succeed in your internship search. Explore the internship page https://liberalarts.utexas.edu/lacs/undergraduate-students/internships/overview.php,  including the internship site reviews https://liberalarts.utexas.edu/lacs/undergraduate-students/internships/overview.php, or visit the appointments page 

 to learn how to make an internship coaching appointment. 

Questions? 

Contact Mark Levy at mark.levy@austin.utexas.edu or 512-560-0676 for course or employer type questions. 

Contact Liberal Arts Career Services at lacs.internships@austin.utexas.edu or 512-471-7900 for application-related questions. 

University Policy: 

The University of Texas at Austin provides, upon request, appropriate academic accommodations for qualified students with disabilities. For more information, contact the Office of the Dean of Students at 471-6259, 471-6441 TT.

 

 


LAH 350 • Creative Writing And Crisis

31099 • Lamson, Brandon
Meets MW 11:30AM-1:00PM JES A303A
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Description:  How are writers and their work intimately shaped by crisis?  How do certain writing practices and aesthetics enable them to respond creatively to challenging conditions and circumstances?  Since the global pandemic struck last year I have been considering these questions and discussing them with fellow poets.  For many of us, creative work has sustained us and helped us to feel connected amidst widespread upheaval and uncertainty.  

In this creative writing course we will study various writers who have used their practice to respond to various forms of crisis: personal, social, environmental, and existential.  From the poetry of Sylvia Plath and William Blake to illustrated works by Lynda Barry and Charles Burns, we will explore a wide range of literary texts that capture our contemporary dialogue with crisis in its myriad dimensions. 

Our course culminates in a showcase of your own creative project, which may contain elements of writing and visual arts.  We will discuss our project proposals early in the semester and develop them as the semester progresses with the goal of sharing them with the community in meaningful ways.    

Texts: 

Lynda Barry – What It Is  

William Blake – Songs of Innocence and Experience  

Sylvia Plath – Ariel

Louise Gluck – The Wild Iris 

Yusef Komunyakaa – Dien Cai Dau 

Charles Burns – Black Hole  

Leslie Marmon Silko – Ceremony (30th anniversary edition)

 


LAH 350 • Elizabethan Poetry And Prose

31104 • Barret, Jk
Meets TTH 12:30PM-2:00PM CAL 323 • Hybrid/Blended
GCWr (also listed as E 374K)
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E 374K  l  Elizabethan Poetry and Prose: HONORS

Instructor:  Barret, J

Unique #:  36619

Semester:  Fall 2021

Cross-lists:  LAH 350, 31104

Prerequisites:  Nine semester hours of coursework in English or rhetoric and writing

Description:  In this Honors seminar, we will read some of the most influential, most experimental and most powerful poetry and prose in the English language.  We will explore questions of artistic representation, nationalism, religious reformation, new audiences, genre, form and linguistic innovation (to name but a few) by immersing ourselves in the fictions of an age renowned for its insatiable literary appetite.  We will survey influential source texts, short poems, poetic theory, and large-scale poetic and imaginative projects including Edmund Spenser’s Faerie Queene.  Students will develop familiarity with formal techniques, narrative structures, and critical approaches as we investigate the Elizabethan passion for poetic innovation.  Drawing on a variety of modalities to introduce students to various research tools and methodologies, this course will help students develop writing and research skills.

This course will include a mix of in-person and online sessions designated by the instructor over the course of the semester. All students enrolled in this course are required to attend both in-person and online sessions. Individual class sessions will be conducted in one modality only. It is NOT possible to take this course online-only. It is NOT possible to attend in-person sessions remotely.

Requirements & Grading:  Written assignments will include informal discussion board posts, research exercises, creative exercise, collaborative annotation, a prospectus, and two papers.

Research and creative exercises: 20%; Quizzes: 10%; Papers, etc.: 45%; Participation, etc.: 25%.


LAH 350 • Fnds Of Intercul Competncy

31105 • Jones, Brandon
Meets MWF 11:00AM-12:00PM GEA 127
CD
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Course Description:

Intercultural competency is the ability to accurately understand and adapt behavior to cultural difference and commonality (Hammer, 1998). This course is designed to help students improve their self and other awareness, understand culture, improve cross-cultural communication, and increase intercultural competency. 

Course Readings:

  • Bennett, M.J. (2004). Becoming interculturally competent. In J. Wurzel (Ed.), Towards multiculturalism: A reader in multicultural education (second edition, pp. 62-77). Newton, MA: Intercultural Resource Corporation.
  • Hammer, M.R. (2009). Solving Problems and Resolving Conflict Using the Intercultural Conflict Style Model and Inventory. In M.A. Moodian (Ed.). Contemporary Leadership and Intercultural Competence (Ch.17, pp. 219-232). Thousand Oaks, CA: Sage.
  • Hammer, M.R. (2008). The Intercultural Development Inventory (IDI): An Approach for assessing and building intercultural competence. In M.A. Moodian (Ed.), Contemporary leadership and intercultural competence: Understanding and utilizing cultural diversity to build successful organizations. Thousand Oaks, CA: Sage.

LAH 350 • Inequality In US Educ Sys

31155 • Pikus, Monique
Meets TTH 11:00AM-12:30PM RLP 2.606
CDWr (also listed as SOC 345D)
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For centuries many have seen the United States as the land of opportunity. Free public education is often viewed as one of the key pillars of opportunity in the U.S. Yet, the quality of public education varies greatly depending on the neighborhood and characteristics of the student. In this class, we will examine how inequality has developed and is maintained within the American public education system. We will learn and critique existing theories of educational inequality such as meritocracy, stereotype threat, and oppositional culture. Next, we will explore the effect of students’ traits on how they interact with and experience school in the U.S. Race/ ethnicity, gender, social class, and special educational needs are just a sample of the attributes that we will investigate. In addition, we will pay particular attention to the role of school funding and residential segregation in maintaining disparities in educational quality. We will conclude by exploring current efforts to combat inequality within the public education system through school choice, accountability campaigns, community-based school reform, and other efforts.


LAH 350 • Latinx Young Adult Lits

31109 • Perez, Domino
Meets TTH 11:00AM-12:30PM CAL 419
CD (also listed as E 323D)
show description

E 323D  |  Latinx Young Adult Literatures: HONORS

Instructor:  Perez, D

Unique #:  36404

Semester:  Fall 2021

Cross-lists:  LAH 350, 31109

 

Prerequisites:  Nine semester hours of coursework in English or rhetoric and writing.

Description:  This course is an introduction to various genres of contemporary Latinx young adult literature.  We will read a range of YA texts by diverse Latinx authors to consider such issues as gender, class, culture, ethnicity, and representations of adolescence and adulthood.  While conversations about YA fiction generally focus on the protagonist’s coming-of-age or strategies for incorporating these works into the classroom, our discussions of the works will be framed by various critical and theoretical approaches.

Required Books:  Acevedo, Elizabeth. The Poet X (2018); Mathieu, Jennifer. The Liars of Mariposa Island (2019); McLemore, Anna-Marie. The Weight of Feathers (2015); Rivera, Gabby. Juliet Takes a Breath (2016); Sáenz, Benjamin Alire. Aristotle and Dante Discover the Secrets of the Universe (2012); Thomas, Aiden. Cemetery Boys (2020); Acevedo, Elizabeth. The Poet X (2018).

Requirements & Grading:  Discussion Board Posts, 20%; Annotated Bibliography, 25%; Author Amplify, 15%; Project Pitch/Feedback, 15%; Final Project, 25%.


LAH 350 • Modernism And Literature

31113 • Cullingford, Elizabeth
Meets TTH 2:00PM-3:30PM BEN 1.118
GCWr (also listed as E 343L)
show description

E 343L  l  Modernish and Literature: HONORS

Instructor:  Cullingford, E

Unique #:  36489

Semester:  Fall 2021

Cross-lists:  LAH 350, 31113

Prerequisites:  Nine semester hours of coursework in English or rhetoric and writing.

Description:  This class will focus on Anglophone Modernist writers during the period 1898-1930, highlighting the relationship between literature and its historical and cultural contexts.  Topics for discussion will include:  1) World War 1, new technology, and urbanization. 2) The new discipline of psychology and its concept of the subconscious mind. 3) The new discipline of anthropology and the idea of the primitive. 4) Changing gender relations and definitions (suffrage, soldiers, and sexuality). 

We will study Modernist poetic and fictional techniques: the abandonment of nineteenth-century realism in the interests of a more subjective apprehension of "reality"; the challenge to the omniscient author and the development of "stream of consciousness" narrative; perspectivism and ambiguity; the use of myth and literary allusion as structuring principles; the pursuit of "organic form," the embrace of “difficulty” by some modernist writers.

Texts:  Joseph Conrad, The Heart of Darkness, 1899 • James Joyce, “The Dead,” 1914; Portrait of the Artist as a Young Man, 1916 • D. H. Lawrence: “Odor of Chrysanthemums,” 1911; “Tickets Please,” 1918 • T.S. Eliot, "The Love Song of J. Alfred Prufrock," 1917; The Waste Land, 1922 • Katharine Mansfield, “The Garden Party,” 1922 • Virginia Woolf, Mrs. Dalloway, 1925; To the Lighthouse, 1927 • W. B. Yeats, poems from The Tower, 1928.

Requirements & Grading:  Attendance and Participation -- Your attendance and participation in the class are required, and will be graded.  In life, a great deal of success consists in just showing up.  You must come to class with your text, having already read the assigned materials, and be prepared to contribute to discussion and close reading.

For a good grade (A or B) clear, grammatical writing and coherent argumentation will be essential.  Students who have problems with their writing are strongly encouraged to meet with me and visit the University Writing Center:  http://uwc.utexas.edu/.

Grades will be based on:  Two 1,200-word essays, revised after feedback from me. Original and revised grades will be averaged, and each average will be worth 20%, for a total of 40%.  A final research paper (30%).  Reading responses (300 words each) posted to our Canvas discussion board (20%).  Attendance (5%), Informed participation (5%).  Plus/minus letter grades will be assigned for the overall course grade.

 

Course Website

I will use Canvas to organize the course, to give you access to essay writing guides and other materials, and to send out announcements and emails.

You will use Canvas to submit your personal information surveys, reading responses, and essay assignments, and to keep up to date with my announcements. Please check Canvas every day.

 


LAH 350 • Money In Amer Politics

31146 • Roberts, Brian
Meets W 3:30PM-6:30PM PAR 310
(also listed as GOV 370R)
show description

     This course explores the nature and consequences of money in American politics and why, at this point in history, we find ourselves embroiled in the most significant debate over campaign finance reform in over thirty years.   The debate goes to the heart of the U.S. Constitution, pitting the First Amendment rights of speech and assembly against the perceived fairness and efficacy of a republican government awash, some claim, in increasingly unaccountable money.

     Campaign finance issues lie at the crossroads of a bewildering number of analytical perspectives.  We (must) examine the work of historians, social scientists, legal scholars, and interested parties on all sides of the debate in an effort not only to assess current policy debates but also to understand how we got here.  During the course we confront and seek answers to a host of questions, including, but by no means limited to:

- How will corporations respond to the Supreme Court’s recent decision permitting unlimited political advertising?

- Why did most 2008 presidential candidates abandon the system of public financing for presidential elections? -Why does the public believe that corporations play such a large role in funding federal election campaigns?

-Why does the Supreme Court allow public perceptions to determine the constitutionality of campaign finance laws?

-Why do U.S. Senators refuse to report their campaign finance activity electronically to the Federal Election Commission?

-How and why is the Internet treated differently than other means of political communication by campaign finance laws?

-What are the consequences of unlimited individual contributions to state election candidates in Texas?

Texts and Works: 

Corrado, Anthony, et al. The New Campaign Finance Sourcebook. 2004. Washington D.C.: Brooking Institution;
Corrado, Anthony and David Magleby Financing the 2008 Election. 2010. Washington D.C.: Brooking Institution;
McChesney, Fred. Money For Nothing: Politicians, Rent Extraction, and Political Extortion.  1997. Cambridge: Harvard University Press;
Urofsky, Melvin., Money & Free Speech: Campaign Finance Reform and the Courts. 2005. Lawrence, KS: University of Kansas Press. Other readings as assigned.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


LAH 350 • Poetry And The Art Of Voice

31114 • Lamson, Brandon
Meets MW 1:00PM-2:30PM RLP 0.122
show description

Description:  We live in an era when many people seek to tell their stories through writing.  In this creative writing course we will explore Confessionalism, a literary movement that featured poets who drew upon their lived experience in their work.  In doing so, these poets challenged social taboos and creates spaces in which their voices could be heard.  

Beginning with the work of Robert Lowell, Sylvia Plath, and John Berryman, we will study how the confessional impulse has evolved in American poetry.  Students will write poems and bring them to our class workshop for discussion and feedback.   

Texts: 

Tony Hoagland – The Art of Voice: Poetic Principles and Practice  

Robert Lowell – Life Studies and For the Union Dead  

Sylvia Plath – Ariel  

Louise Gluck – The Wild Iris

Yusef Komunyakaa – Dien Cai Dau

Nick Flynn – I Will Destroy You  

 


LAH 350 • Spatializing Culture

31129 • Weinreb, Amelia
Meets MWF 1:00PM-2:00PM MEZ 2.124 • Hybrid/Blended
GCWr (also listed as J S 365)
show description

This course focuses on Jewish communities throughout the globe and over time, including, but not limited to: Jewish life in Latin America, the Middle East, North Africa, Asia, and Europe. The conceptual frame for understanding the multiple migrations and settlement of Jewish populations is the “Spatial Turn” emerged in the late twentieth and early twenty-first century which has transformed the understanding of the way space, place and landscape is produced, perceived, and experienced. In order to illuminate each of these conceptually, in the first unit of the course, we will consider global Jewish culture is spatialized. In the process of learning about spatializing culture, students will also see how it may be applied to Jewish spatial experiences at diverse geographic scales. These are included, but not limited to: spatial components of assimilation, exclusion, and antisemitism resulting in ghettoization, expulsion, migration, exile, “wandering,” and genocide; Enduring ideas of Israel as Holy Land, homeland, and realized in the construction of nationhood, territory and return, and the State of Israel; Global support and global critiques of Zionism, and the spatial components of settlement, dispute and occupation the Israeli-Palestinian conflict


LAH 350 • The Graphic Novel

31134 • Schlund-Vials, Cathy
Meets MWF 2:00PM-3:00PM CAL 221
(also listed as E 324C)
show description

E 324C  l  The Graphic Novel: HONORS

Instructor:  Schlund-Vials, C

Unique #:  36419

Semester:  Fall 2021

Cross-lists:  LAH 350, 31134

Prerequisites:  Nine semester hours of coursework in English or rhetoric and writing.

Description:  This class takes seriously and centrally the rise of the graphic novel as a legitimate site of interdisciplinary inquiry and scholarly engagement.  From mainstream superhero serials to book-length graphic novels, from Marvel to manga, comics as blended image/text genre engages diverse disciplines, embodies varied methodologies, and encompasses multiple geopolitical spaces.  This wide-ranging approach to graphic novels and comics narrative draws upon literary critic Ramzi Fawaz’s contention in a 2019 PMLA article that comics is “a medium that demands an exceptionally rigorous account of multiplicity.”  Following suit, we will contextualize our readings of graphic novels via literary mode, media history, visual culture, artist interviews, comics theory, and comics criticism.

Texts (A partial list, subject to change):  McCloud, Scott. Understanding Comics; Spiegelman, Art. Maus (Volumes 1 and 2); Lewis, John, Aydin Andrew, and Powell, Nate, March (Volumes 1, 2, and 3); Tran, G.B., Vietnamerica; Quintero, Lila Weaver, Dark Room: A Memoir in Black and White; Ware, Chris. Jimmy Corrigan; Millar, Mark. Superman: Red Son; Bechdel, Alison. Fun Home; Asano, Inio. What a Wonderful World!; and Tomine, Adrian. Shortcomings.

Requirements & Grading:  Participation in Class discussion, 15%; Weekly Responses, 20%; Short Midterm Paper (4-6 pages), 30%; and Final Paper/Project (8-10 pages), 35%.


LAH 352C • Germany In The 20th Century

31165 • Crew, David
Meets TTH 3:30PM-5:00PM GAR 0.120
EGCWr (also listed as HIS 337N, REE 335)
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Description: Hitler and the Nazis have given twentieth-century Germany a world-historical significance it would otherwise have lacked. Even from our vantage point, the Nazi regime is still one of the most dramatic and destructive episodes in western European, indeed, in world history. Nazism is synonymous with terror, concentration camps and mass murder. Hitler's war claimed the lives of tens of millions and left Europe in complete ruins. The danger resides in the temptation to view all of German history from the end of the nineteenth-century onwards as merely the pre-history of Nazism, thereby failing to deal with each period on its own terms. And what do we do with the more than half a century of German history since 1945? With the defeat of  Nazi Germany in 1945, the course of German history appears to have experienced a radical break. New political and social systems were imposed upon the two sides of the divided Germany by the victors. The hostilities of the Cold War appeared to ensure a permanent division of Germany, which in 1961 assumed a compelling symbolic form, the Berlin Wall. But in 1989, the dramatic changes in the Soviet Union and Eastern Europe revolutionized East Germany as well. The Berlin Wall came down, East and West Germany were once again joined together in one nation. What exactly this newest version of the German nation will look like in ten or twenty years is still unclear. 
In the first half of the course, we will begin by discussing the origins and effects of  World War One(1914-1918), then move on to the German Revolution(1918-1919) and the Weimar Republic(l9l8-l933), the Nazi regime (1933-1945) and the Holocaust. The questions we will focus on here are: Was Germany’s first experiment with democracy between 1918 and 1933 doomed to failure? What factors contributed to the rise of Nazism and how did the Nazi regime affect Germany and Europe? Were all vestiges of Nazism destroyed in 1945? In the second half of the semester we will discuss the history of  Germany in the Cold War(1945-1989). We will end by talking about the consequences of the end of the Cold War and the fall of the Berlin Wall (1989 to the present). Here, the main questions will be: Did, West and East Germany follow fundamentally new paths? What clues can be found in the histories of the Federal Republic in West Germany and the German Democratic Republic in East Germany since 1949 that may indicate the possibilities for change in the future? How has the unification of East and West Germany affected Germany's role in Europe and the world?
 
 
Required Reading:
Mary Fulbrook,The Divided Nation

Erich Maria Remarque, All Quiet on the Western Front

Richard Bessel(ed.) Life in the Third Reich

Primo Levi, Survival in Auschwitz

Peter Schneider, The Wall Jumper

We will be working extensively with materials on this site: http://germanhistorydocs.ghi-dc.org/
 
Assignments/Grading:
(1)Two longer essay assignments (each 6-8 pages typewritten, each worth 30% of your final grade) which ask you to think critically about some of the major issues in twentieth century German history.
(2)In addition to these two longer essay assignments, you will be asked to write one shorter essay (4-5 pages typewritten—worth 20% of the final grade) on any one of the books by  Remarque, Bessel, Levi, or Schneider.


LAH 358Q • Supervised Research

31170
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Supervised Research. Individual instruction. Prerequisite: A
University grade point average of at least 3.50 and consent of the
liberal arts honors program adviser. Only one LAH 358Q may be applied towards college honors. Course may be repeated.


LAH 679TA • Honors Thesis

31175
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Restricted to Plan I majors in the College of Liberal Arts. Supervised research, reading, and writing of a substantial paper on an interdepartmental subject.


LAH 679TB • Honors Thesis

31180
IIWr
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Restricted to Plan I majors in the College of Liberal Arts. Supervised research, reading, and writing of a substantial paper on an interdepartmental subject.