Department of Mexican American and Latina/o Studies
Department of Mexican American and Latina/o Studies

MAS 177 • Mellon Mays Program Seminar

40615 • Toribio, Almeida
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The MMUF Student Research Success for Academic Careers summer workshop will focus MMUF researchers on their summer projects. The course will feature units on methodology, understanding and constructing bibliographies, annotation, literature reviews, and writing skills, including emphasis on sharing writing with cohort peers.


MAS 301 • Intr Mex Amer Latina/O Studies

40504 • Minich, Julie
Meets MWF 11:00AM-12:00PM BUR 208
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FLAGS:   Wr  |  CD  |  II


MAS 301 • Intr Mex Amer Latina/O Studies

40500
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FLAGS:   Wr  |  CD  |  II


MAS 307 • Intro To Mexican Amer Cul Stds

40505 • Alvarez, Chad
Meets TTH 2:00PM-3:30PM PAR 206
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This course is designed to provide an introduction to the history and culture of Mexican Americans in the United States from the early nineteenth-century to the present. We will work from the premise that Mexican American history is deeply intertwined with both “mainstream” U.S. and Mexican history. We will not study Mexicans Americans in isolation, nor will we assume the Mexican American population to be static or monolithic. On the contrary, we will strive for empirical precision and specificity in our discussions, always seeking to move past stereotypes, clichés, and anecdotes in an effort to build a sophisticated framework with which to understand the significance of the Mexican American presence in the United States. The primary disciplinary emphasis of the course is the field of history, though our study of the past will be informed by a analysis of culture and the ways in which historical and cultural studies inform one another.


MAS 308 • Intro To Mex Amer Policy Stds

40510 • Vasquez, Antonio
Meets MWF 11:00AM-12:00PM GWB 1.130
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This course examines contemporary Mexican-American issues from the perspective of a policy analyst. Students will learn the basic tools of policy analysis and apply them to a variety of issues and proposed policy solutions. The course has two objectives: (1) To train students how to inform public policy by providing decision makers with objective policy analysis. (2) To help students understand why public policy decisions often diverge from the recommendations made by policy analysts. In other words, this is a course about both policy analysis and the politics behind policymaking.

While the focus of this course is on policy issues that affect Mexican-Americans and/or Latinos, students will learn that policies often have widespread impact on many groups. Policy also often results in unintended consequences.

Students will also learn about the challenges policy analysts face when they attempt to use objective public policy metrics to analyze policies that often have moral or symbolic frames.


MAS 309 • Bilingualism In The Americas

40515 • Colomina-Alminana, Juan
Meets MWF 8:00AM-9:00AM PAR 303
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Bilingualism is a complex phenomenon that refers to the capacity to speak and communicate indistinctly in two or more different languages. Then, it is not a semantic feature of the natural language; it is a pragmatic characteristic of its use. Since language is a property of groups of speakers, bilingualism is a skill showed and belonging to certain individuals. Because of the nature of our contemporary society, this phenomenon is a lived reality for a number of individuals in several communities inside and outside the US. This is to say, the fact that several communities in the Américas conserve a native language besides the official one extends between the members of these communities the knowledge and use of different ways to communicate.

 

The main purpose of this course is to analyze the linguistic, cognitive, social, and cultural aspects of this complex phenomenon. To do so, the course supposes that the main characteristics of the (different variables of the different) languages are independent of the origin of these communities. The course will primarily focus on the relationship that is established between English (as the vernacular language) and the second co-existent language, especially the binomial with Spanish (approximately 70% of course material) and other common US bilingual language experiences as well. The idea is to analyze the bilingual speaker in context within the community to which she belongs, especially relating to Mexican American and US-Latino communities.

 

TEXT:

Multiple Voices. An Introduction to Bilingualism, by Carol Myers-Scotton (Oxford: Blackwell, 2006). Additional texts will be available on the Blackboard.

           

GRADING:

25% Final Paper

25% Two Short Essays (12.5% each)

10% Peer-Review Sessions

10% Oral Presentation

30% Attendance and Participation

(5% additional extra-credit short essay)

 


MAS 311 • Ethncty & Gender: La Chicana

40520 • Perez, Alexandrea
Meets MWF 9:00AM-10:00AM GAR 0.132
(also listed as SOC 308D, WGS 301)
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Description:

The purpose of this course is to examine the various experiences, perspectives, and expressions of Chicanas in the United States. This involves examining the meaning and history of the term, “Chicana” as it was applied to and incorporated by Mexican American women during the Chicano Movement in areas of the Southwest United States, such as Texas and California. We will also explore what it means to be Chicana in the United States today. The course will begin with a historical overview of Mexican American women's experiences in the United States, including the emergence of Chicana feminism. We will discuss central concepts of Chicana feminism and attempt to understand how those concepts link to everyday lived experiences. Specifically, the relationship between gender, race/ethnicity, and class will be key as we discuss issues that have been significant in the experiences and self-identification of Chicanas, such as: family, gender, sexuality, religion/spirituality, education, language, labor, and political engagement. We will be engaging in interdisciplinary analysis not only concerning cultural traditions, values, belief systems, and symbols but also in relation to the expressive culture of Chicanas, including folk and religious practices, literature and poetry, the visual arts, and music. Finally, we will examine media representations of Chicanas through critical analyses of film. By the end of this course, it is my hope that you will not only be more critical readers and thinkers, but that you will also be able to apply themes and elements from the readings and discussions to your understanding of your own experiences.

Readings:

Anzaldúa, Gloria and Moraga, Cherríe eds. (2015) This Bridge Called My Back: Writings by Radical Women of Color.

 Anzaldúa, Gloria (2015) Light in the Dark Luz en lo Oscuro: Rewriting Identity,  Spirituality, Reality.


MAS 311 • Ethncty & Gender: La Chicana

40525 • Rosas, Lilia
Meets MWF 10:00AM-11:00AM PAR 101
(also listed as SOC 308D, WGS 301)
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Description:

The purpose of this course is to examine the various experiences, perspectives, and expressions of Chicanas in the United States. This involves examining the meaning and history of the term, “Chicana” as it was applied to and incorporated by Mexican American women during the Chicano Movement in areas of the Southwest United States, such as Texas and California. We will also explore what it means to be Chicana in the United States today. The course will begin with a historical overview of Mexican American women's experiences in the United States, including the emergence of Chicana feminism. We will discuss central concepts of Chicana feminism and attempt to understand how those concepts link to everyday lived experiences. Specifically, the relationship between gender, race/ethnicity, and class will be key as we discuss issues that have been significant in the experiences and self-identification of Chicanas, such as: family, gender, sexuality, religion/spirituality, education, language, labor, and political engagement. We will be engaging in interdisciplinary analysis not only concerning cultural traditions, values, belief systems, and symbols but also in relation to the expressive culture of Chicanas, including folk and religious practices, literature and poetry, the visual arts, and music. Finally, we will examine media representations of Chicanas through critical analyses of film. By the end of this course, it is my hope that you will not only be more critical readers and thinkers, but that you will also be able to apply themes and elements from the readings and discussions to your understanding of your own experiences.

Readings:

Anzaldúa, Gloria and Moraga, Cherríe eds. (2015) This Bridge Called My Back: Writings by Radical Women of Color.

 Anzaldúa, Gloria (2015) Light in the Dark Luz en lo Oscuro: Rewriting Identity,  Spirituality, Reality.


MAS 314 • Mexican American Lit And Cul

40535 • Loza, Maria
Meets TTH 9:30AM-11:00AM BEN 1.122
(also listed as E 314V)
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E 314V  l  3-Mexican American Literature and Culture

 

Instructor:  Loza, M

Unique #:  35165

Semester:  Fall 2018

Cross-lists:  MAS 314

Restrictions:  n/a

Computer instruction:  No

 

Prerequisites:  One of the following: E 303C (or 603A), RHE 306, 306Q, or T C 303C (or 603A).

 

Description:  This course is a general introduction to the literature written by and about Mexican Americans/Chicanos (U.S. citizens of Mexican ancestry).  We will use youth and childhood as a lens into our texts’ exploration of issues such as race, gender, class, and sexuality.

 

Students should expect to develop some understanding of the specific cultural, historical, and political contexts that inform the literature.  Knowledge of these contexts will enhance our understanding of these authors’ politics and aesthetics.  We have a range of texts including novels, fiction, poetry, graphic novels, and film.  Our goal will be to see these works as embedded in specific contexts that must be explored in order to understand, as much as possible, the cultural and political nuances of the texts.  Students should also remember that this class fulfills the requirement for a substantial writing component course and serves as an introduction to the major.  As such, a good deal of time, both in and outside of the classroom, will be devoted to working on original compositions and learning about critical approaches to texts.

 

The primary aim of this course is to help students develop and improve the critical reading, writing, and thinking skills needed for success in upper-division courses in English and other disciplines.  They will also gain practice in using the Oxford English Dictionary and other online research tools and print resources that support studies in the humanities.  Students will learn basic information literacy skills and models for approaching literature with various historical, generic, and cultural contexts in mind.

 

This course contains a writing flag.  The writing assignments in this course are arranged procedurally with a focus on invention, development through instructor and peer feedback, and revision; they will comprise a major part of the final grade.

 

Tentative Texts:  

Print:  The House on Mango Street, Sandra Cisneros; …y no se lo tragó la tierra, Tomás Rivera (bilingual edition); Aristotle and Dante Discover the Secrets of the Universe, Benjamin Alire Sáenz; I Am Not Your Perfect Mexican Daughter, Erika L. Sánchez; Lowriders to the Center of the Earth, Cathy Camper and Raúl The Third (illus.).

 

Films:  Coco (2017); Quinceañera (2006)

 

We will also have shorter reading assignments (scholarly articles, blogs, reviews, etc.) that will be available via Canvas.

 

Requirements & Grading:  Attendance: 10%; Participation: 20%; (Close) Reading Quizzes: 10%; Close Reading Essay (Short): 10%; Close Reading and Context Essay: 15%; Research Essay: 35%

 

The first essay requires substantial revision and resubmission.  The second essay may also be revised and resubmitted by arrangement with the Instructor.


MAS 314 • Mexican American Lit And Cul

40530 • Rosas, Lilia
Meets MWF 1:00PM-2:00PM MEZ 1.206
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Description:  Gloria Anzaldúa famously called the border between México and the United States a “1,950 mile-long open wound,” “una herida abierta,” where “a third country—a border culture” has arisen on either side of the Rio Grande/Río Bravo and beyond.  In this course, we will traverse the borders of language(s), geography, history, and identity negotiated by Mexican-American artists from Texas in a variety of literary genres, visual art, and film.  Our methods will be intersectional—attending to class, gender, sexuality, religion, etc., in addition to race—as we explore these (re)definitions of what it means to be, in Cherríe Moraga’s words, American “con acento.”

 

The primary aim of this course is to help students develop and improve the critical reading, writing, and thinking skills needed for success in upper-division courses in English and other disciplines.  They will also gain practice in using the Oxford English Dictionary and other online research tools and print resources that support studies in the humanities.  Students will learn basic information literacy skills and models for approaching literature with various historical, generic, and cultural contexts in mind.

 

This course contains a writing flag.  The writing assignments in this course are arranged procedurally with a focus on invention, development through instructor and peer feedback, and revision; they will comprise a major part of the final grade.

 

Tentative Texts:  Anzaldúa, Borderlands/La Frontera: The New Mestiza (nonfiction, memoir, theory); Alonzo, Jotos del Barrio (play); Silva, Flesh to Bone (short stories).

 

Requirements & Grading:  There will be a series of 3 formal writing assignments, the first of which must be revised and resubmitted (70% of the final grade in total).  Excluding the final project (critical or creative), the second assignment may also be revised and resubmitted by arrangement with the Instructor.  Students will also have the opportunity to practice writing in a variety of other genres, including reading journals (or the occasional quiz), creative writing exercises, and in-class presentations (30% of the final grade).


MAS 316 • History Of Mexican Amers In US

40540 • Zamora, Emilio
Meets TTH 9:30AM-11:00AM CAL 100
(also listed as HIS 314K)
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The reading and lecture course examines the historical development of the Mexican community in the United States since 1848, with an emphasis on the period between 1900 and the present.  The primary purpose of the course is to address time and place specific variations in the incorporation of the Mexican community as a national minority and bottom segment of the U.S. working class.  One of my central concerns is to explain two inter-related historical trends in this incorporation, steady upward mobility and unrelenting social marginalization.  I emphasize work experiences, race thinking, social relations, trans-border relations, social causes and larger themes in U.S. history such as wars, sectional differences, industrialization, reform, labor and civil rights struggles, and the development of a modern urbanized society. Also, I incorporate relevant aspects of the history of Latinos, African Americans, and Mexico.

Texts:
Manuel G. Gonzales, Mexicanos, A History of Mexicans in the US (Bloomington: Indiana University Press, 1999).
Angela Valenzuela, “The Drought of Understanding and the Hummingbird Spirit,” Unpublished essay in my possession.
Emilio Zamora, Claiming Rights and Righting Wrongs in Texas, Mexican Workers and Job Politics during WWII (College Station: Texas A&M University Press, 2009).
Emilio Zamora, “Guide for Writing Family History Research Paper.

Grading:
Mid-term examination (25%),
Final examination (25%),
Research paper (30%),
Two chapter reports (10%)
Film report (10%).


MAS 319 • Drug History In The Americas

40545 • Vasquez, Antonio
Meets TTH 3:30PM-5:00PM WAG 201
(also listed as AMS 315, LAS 310)
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DESCRIPTION: 

The international traffic in illegal drugs is a phenomenon loaded with important implications for democracy, public health, and politics. Yet it is also freighted with misunderstanding, prejudice, and bad data. In an effort to demystify, this course examines the narcotics trade from a historical and transnational perspective, tracing the multiple and intertwined histories of psychoactive substances, law enforcement, and diplomacy. We will explore the origins of marijuana and poppy cultivation, the medical development of cocaine, the popularization of hallucinogens, the invention of synthetics, while also considering why other mind-altering substances like tobacco, coffee, sugar, and many pharmaceuticals remain legal. We will also examine the rise of the Columbian and Mexican crime syndicates and the dramatic expansion and internationalization of law enforcement and incarceration. 

 

TEXT: 

Andreas, Peter. "The Politics of Measuring Illicit Flows and Policy Effectiveness." In Sex, Drugs, and Body Counts, edited by Peter Andreas and Kelly Greenhill. Ithaca: Cornell University Press, 2010.  

 

Mintz, Sidney. Sweetness and Power: The Place of Sugar in Modern History. New York: Viking, 1985.  

 

Pendergrast, Mark. Uncommon Grounds: The History of Coffee and How It Transformed Our World. New York: Basic Books, 1999.  

 

Gootenberg, Paul. "Talking About the Flow: Drugs, Borders, and the Discourse of Drug Control." Cultural Critique, no. 71 (2009).  

 

Astorga Almanza, Luis. "Cocaine in Mexico: A Prelude to 'los narcos'." In Cocaine: Global Histories, edited by Paul Gootenberg, 183-191. New York: Routledge, 1999.  

 

Camp, Roderic Ai. Mexico's Military on the Democratic Stage. Westport, Conn.; Washington, D.C.: Praeger Security International; published in cooperation with the Center for Strategic and International Studies, 2005. 

 

GRADING:  

Participation: 25%  

Midterm: 25%  

Debate: 25%  

Final exam: 25%


MAS 374 • Bilingual Minds

40565 • Lopez, Belem
Meets TTH 12:30PM-2:00PM PAR 103
(also listed as LIN 373)
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A bilingual is defined as an individual who functions in more than one language on a regular basis. Psycholinguistics is the study of the cognitive processes that underlie how language users acquire, comprehend, produce, use, and represent language. This course will provide an introduction to classic and recent work on bilingualism from a psycholinguistic perspective. After reviewing basic concepts and methods in  psycholinguistics the course will address empirical studies and theoretical frameworks related to such topics as stages of bilingual language acquisition and the role of age of acquisition, how bilinguals perceive and segment speech sounds, how word meanings are accessed and stored, how sentences are understood and planned, how characteristics of written language affect reading, how mixed language utterances are processed, and how properties of specific languages shape thought.  Additional topics will include cognitive and neural repercussions of knowing more than one language, the cognitive impact of differences in degree of informal translation experience, and how bilingual language processing may be affected by aging, disuse of a language, or brain-injury. Given the interdisciplinary nature of the topic we will draw on research from cognitive psychology, linguistics, computer science, education, and neuroscience. Students will have the opportunity to apply course concepts by making their own bilingualism related internet memes.

 

TEXT:

De Groot, A. M. (2011). Language and cognition in bilinguals and multilinguals: An introduction.           Psychology Press, New York, NY.

 

Bialystok, E. (2009). Bilingualism: The good, the bad, and the indifferent. Bilingualism:    Language and Cognition, 12, 3-11.

Clashen, H., & Felser, C. (2006). How native-like is non-native language processing? Trends in                 Cognitive Sciences, 10, 564-570.

Comeau, L., Genesee, F., & Lapaquette, L. (2003). The modeling hypothesis and child bilingual     codemixing. International Journal of Bilingualism, 7(2), 113-126.

Cook, V. (1991). The poverty of the stimulus argument and multicompetence. Second Language Research, 7, 103-117.

Grosjean, F. (1997). The bilingual individual. International Journal of Research and Practice in     Interpreting  2, 163-187.

Haugen, E. (1986). Bilinguals have more fun! Journal of English Linguistics, 19, 106-120.

Heredia, R. R. & Altarriba, J.(2001). Bilingual language mixing: Why do bilinguals code-    switch? Current Directions in Psychological Science, 10, 164-168.

Hilchey, M.D. & Klein, R.M. (2011). Are there bilingual advantages on nonlinguistic        interference tasks? Implications for plasticity of executive control processes.       Psychonomic Bulletin & Review 18, 625-658.

Ianco-Worral, A.D. (1972). Bilingualism and cognitive development. Child Development, 43,        1390-1400.

Moreno, E.M., Rodríguez-Fornells, A., & Laine, M. (2008). Event-related potentials (ERPs) in    the study of bilingual language processing, Journal of Neurolinguistics, 21, 477-508.

Peal, E. & Lambert, W.E. (1962). “The relation of bilingualism to intelligence,” Psychological                    Monographs: General and Applied, 76 (27), 1-23.

Poplack, S. (1980). Sometimes I’ll start a sentence in Spanish y termino en español: Toward a      typology of code-switching. Linguistics, 18, 581-618.

Vaid, J. (2006). Joking across languages; Perspectives on humor, emotion, and bilingualism. In                 A. Pavlenko (ed.) Bilingual minds; Emotional experience, expression, and representation   (pp. 152-182). Clevedon: Multilingual Matters.

           

 

GRADING:

This course will consist of lectures, discussion, as well as in-class discussion of readings led by students.

 

Evaluation: Final course grades will be based on the following:

  • Participation and attendance (10%): This course will be dependent on active student participation and in class discussion. This includes having completed the class readings before coming to class and bringing questions and comments about each reading.
  • Reflection papers (40%): Each week students will be asked to turn in a 1-page reflection paper that is in the form of comments, critiques, or questions, based on the readings for that particular week. 
  • Leading discussion (20%):  Each student will lead discussion of one of the readings given on a particular day. This will involve briefly summarizing the content of the readings and posing questions or raising critical issues to the class for discussion. Student thoughts and perspectives on the assigned texts will fuel that day’s in-class discussion.
  • Bilingualism Internet Meme (15%): Students will be asked to form small groups and each group will create an internet meme based on a topic covered in class. The groups will also submit a written statement on how that meme is related to class. The groups will compete with each other to come up with the best memes. Grades will be based on completion and participation.
  • Final Paper (15%):   Students will prepare a research proposal on a topic relevant to the course. The proposal will identify a research question, briefly review relevant literature, and propose a way of answering the question.  Required length is 8-10 pages not including sources/references.

MAS 374 • Environment And Mex America

40567 • Alvarez, Chad
Meets TTH 12:30PM-2:00PM GAR 0.120
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MAS 374 • Latina/O Psychology

40570 • Lopez, Belem
Meets TTH 11:00AM-12:30PM PAR 308
(also listed as EDP 376T)
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The purpose of this course is to examine the psychological research and literature related to the experiences of Latinxs in the U.S. through readings, media, and class discussions. The course will provide an introduction to the various Latino subgroups and the course will provide with an introduction and general background to Latina/o psychology.

This course is an interdisciplinary one and will draw on methodologies from different disciplines such as, but not limited to racial/ethnic studies, women & gender studies, queer studies, film studies, history, linguistics, literature, psychology, sociology and popular culture. And so in the course we will:

  • Acquire knowledge regarding historical, cultural, economic, and political factors that explain the experiences and value orientations of Latina/os in the U.S.
  • Engage in Latina/o self-expression and knowledge in various mediums (i.e. culture, religious practices, literature, poetry, language practices etc.) in order to gain cultural competence to advance one’s knowledge and understanding of between and within group difference among Latina/os.
  • Examine how Latina/os have been positioned within local and national communities, cultural systems, and discourse using in class discussion and readings.
  • Examine media representations of  Latina/os in film and other popular representations
  • Arrive at understanding of how Latina/o psychology is both theoretically and intellectually important in relation to the Latina/o experience in the U.S.

 

Potential Texts

Hurtado, A., & Gurin, P. (2004). Chicana/o Identity in a Changing US Society: ¿Quién Soy? ¿Quiénes Somos?. University of Arizona Press.

 

Villarruel, F. (2009). Handbook of US Latino psychology: Developmental and community-based perspectives. Sage.

***other readings will be posted to CANVAS***

 

Grade

Attendance is highly recommended and will be taken into account.

Your final course grade will be based on the following:

1.)   Participation and attendance (15%): This course will be dependent on your active participation and in class discussion. This includes having completed the class readings before coming to class and by bringing questions and comments you have about each reading.

2.)   Reflection papers (20%): At the end of each class unit you will be required to turn in a reflection paper. In this paper you will give your reflections in the form of comments, critiques, questions, etc. raised from that unit’s readings. Page length requirement is 1 page single spaced due at the beginning of each class.

3.)   In-class presentation (25 %):  Each student will be selected to lead the discussion of the readings given on a particular day. This student will be in charge of briefly summarizing the content of the readings and posing questions or raising critical issues to the class for discussion. Your thoughts and perspectives on the assigned texts will fuel that day’s in-class discussion.

4.)   Film Analysis (FA) (25%): You will pick one of the film from the list of films provided in class and will write a paper in which you synthesize and analyze your observations of relevant class issues in the film. Provide implications of your observations and relate issues to course readings, discussion, etc.

5.)   Final Paper (15%): You will be required to develop a research paper that explores in-depth one or more topics related to the Chicana/o experience (i.e. race, gender, culture, acculturation, immigration, spirituality, etc.). You may also raise questions and ideas as well as any reflections stemming from class discussion, readings, and films. Required length is 12-15 pages not including sources/references.


MAS 374 • Latina/O Spirituality

40575 • Gonzalez-Martin, Rachel
Meets MWF 1:00PM-2:00PM GWB 1.130
(also listed as AMS 370, R S 346)
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DESCRIPTION: 

This course introduces students to the religious and spiritual practices of diverse Latina/o populations living in the United States. Students will work with primary and secondary texts, ethnographic film and museum exhibitions to examine the diverse ways in which Latina/o communities’ create spiritual meaning in their lives. It will examine the religious and spiritual practices from the vantage point of transition and change as a way of understanding larger aspects of cultural and social change within 21st century U.S. Latina/o publics. This course incorporates materials and theoretical approaches relevant to multiple diasporic Latina/o communities including Afro Latino and Indigenous migrant communities. Students will learn about the diverse aspects of Latina/o spiritual, from the history of Latina/o Catholicism, to influences of West African ritual, to the rise of Latina/o Muslim conversion in the United States. It will expressly look at cultural productions from the vantage points of gender and race politics, and incorporate the spiritual tradition of women, queer communities, and various “othered” Latina/o identifying community members. 

 

TEXT: 

  • Aponte, Edward David. 2012. Santo!: Varieties of Latina/o Spirituality. New York: Orbis.  
  • Baez, Edward J. "Spirituality and the Gay Latino Client." Journal of Gay and Lesbian Social Services 4, no. 2 (1996): 69-81.  
  • Daniel, Yvonne. 2005. Dancing Wisdom: Embodied Knowledge in Haitian Vodou, Cuban Yoruba, and Bahian Candomble. Urbana: University of Illinois Press Otero, Solimar. 2014.  
  • Yemoja: Gender, Sexuality, and Creativity in the Latina/o and Afro-Atlantic Diasporas. Albany: State University of New York Press.  
  • Perez, Laura E. 2007. Chicana Art: The Politics of Spiritual and Aesthetic Altarities. Durham: Duke University Press  
  • Rodriguez, Roberto C. 2014. Our Sacred Maíz Is Our Mother: Indigeneity and Belonging in the Americas. Tucson: University of Arizona Press  
  • Romero Cash, Marie. 1998. Living Shrines: Home Altars of New Mexico. Santa Fe: Museum of New Mexico Press 

 

GRADING:   

  • Minute Papers/Attendance 10%  
  • 3 Film/Art-Exhibit Reviews 15%  
  • Project Proposal & Annotated Bibliography 20%  
  • Midterm Exam 20%  
  • Final Exam 15%  
  • Final Project 20%

MAS 374 • Latino Migrations And Asylum

40577 • Vasquez, Antonio
Meets MWF 1:00PM-2:00PM CBA 4.344
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The purpose of this seminar is to study the politics of asylum practices in the United States and forced migration from Latin America. Students will gain knowledge on Latino migrations, asylum and detention through both the lens of global political economy, and critical race theory and through practical engagement with refugee and migrant organizations/legal practitioners. The course will focus on asylum policies and practices from the 1980s to the present and will draw upon case studies based on asylum seekers from Mexico and Central America among other migrant sending regions. There will be an emphasis on how groups with competing interests and visions struggle to conserve or transform the contemporary asylum regime in a transnational model of society and economy between the United States and Latin America. Finally, the seminar will also consider the relationship between asylum and the growth of detention practices and explore the efforts of refugees and legal practitioners to challenge and reform the contemporary asylum regime.

Text:

  • Andrew I. Schoenholtz, Philip G. Schrag, Jaya Ramji-Nogales(Eds). Lives in Balance: Asylum Adjudications by the Department of Homeland Security. New York, NY: NYU, 2014.
  • Elena, Fiddian-Qasmiyeh, Gil Loescher, Katy Long, Nando Sigona (Eds). The Oxford Handbook of Refugee and Forced Migration Studies. Oxford, UK: Oxford University Press, 2014.
  • Garcia, Maria Cristina. Seeking Refuge: Central American Migration to Mexico, The United States, and Canada. Berkeley: University of California Press, 2006.
  • Loyd, Jenna Et al. Beyond Walls and Cages: Prisons, Borders and Global Crisis.Atlanta, GA: University of Georgia Press, 2012.
  • Paley, Dawn. Drug War Capitalism. AK Press, 2014.
  • Rosa Linda Fregoso and Cynthia Bejarano (Eds.). Terrorizing Women: Feminicide in the Americas. Durham, NC: Duke University Press, 2010.

Grading:

  • Participation (20 points) Students are required to participate in course discussions and are expected to attend all the course sessions. Participation will be evaluated based upon the student’s contributions to class discussion and presentations. Each student will be required to facilitate select reading assignments during a week of class discussion. Students must turn in a summary of the readings for the day that they chose to facilitate discussion. The two-page summary and analysis should also have thoughtful discussion questions for the class.
  • Asylum Group Project (30 points) Each student will be required to work on an immigration relief project case study. This will require doing country specific research on a particular social group seeking relief from deportation. Each student will be required to be responsible for one of four components of each project. The Four components are 1) Coordinator, 2) Expert Witness, 3) Researcher 1, and 4) Researcher 2.
  • Midterm (25 points) Students will receive a take home midterm comprised of a series of questions related to the contents covered in class. The midterm will be in essay format and will be roughly 6-8 pages long.
  • Final (25 points) Students will receive a take home final comprised of a series of questions related to the contents covered in class. The final will be in essay format and will be roughly 6-8 pages long.

 

 

 

 

 


MAS 374 • Latino Politics

40597 • Leal, David
Meets TTH 5:00PM-6:30PM WAG 101
(also listed as GOV 370K, LAS 337M)
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Course Description:

 

This course will introduce you to the past and present political experiences of the United States Latino populations.  The course begins with a discussion of political identity: what does it mean to be Latino/a, Hispanic, or Chicano, and what are the politically relevant commonalities and differences in Latino communities?  We then discuss Latino political history, beginning with the Spanish empire but focusing particularly on the 19th and 20th centuries in the southwest.  In doing so, we will study Latino political movements, organizations, and leaders.  Moving to recent decades, the class examines Latino inputs into the American political system, including public opinion, voting, elections, and the role of gender in politics.  The class also discusses the political experiences of two of the largest non-Mexican national-origin groups: Puerto Ricans and Cuban Americans.  We then explore the growing voice of Latinos in political institutions, such as the U.S. Congress and state legislatures.  Lastly, the class covers key policy issues for Latino communities, including immigration and education. 

 

Course Grade:

 

Exam #1 (20% of course grade; covers first third of the class material)

 

Exam #2 (30% of course grade; covers second third of the class material)

 

Exam #3 (30% of course grade; covers last third of the class material and includes cumulative questions)

 

Book review (20% of course grade)

 

Readings:

 

Garcia, F. Chris, and Gabriel Sanchez. 2007. Hispanics and the U.S. Political System: Moving Into the Mainstream. New York: Prentice Hall.

 

Gutierrez, David. 1995. Walls and Mirrors: Mexican Americans, Mexican Immigrants, and the Politics of Identity. Berkeley: University of California Press.

 

Coursepack from Jenn's

 

Grading: The following is the class grading scale:

 

 
93-100% A (4)
90-92% A- (3.67)
87-89% B+ (3.33)
83-86% B (3)
80-82% B- (2.67)
77-79% C+ (2.33)
73-76% C (2)
70-72% C- (1.67)
67-69% D+ (1.33)
63-66% D (1)
60-62% D- (.67)
Below 60% F (0)
 

 

Flag: Cultural Diversity


MAS 374 • Latino Urbanism In US City

40579 • Ledesma De Leon, Edna
Meets MWF 12:00PM-1:00PM GAR 0.120
(also listed as ARC 327R, URB 354)
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 OVERVIEW    

This course will address Latino Urbanism in the American city as a new understanding of urban placemaking and development. This course will explore the intersections of culture, place, and design to critically address how the socioeconomic dynamics that underlie demographic shifts in the U.S. are influencing urban change in the American landscape. The class will focus particularly on exploring the evolution and ways by which Latinos shape the built environment, both at in the public realm and in the home. 

 The class will address the Latino Urbanism through the lenses of history, architecture, and city planning. The course will survey the history of urban development in the United States, while critically addressing the challenges Latinos have faced in addressing inequality and social disparities. Students will examine the complex relationships between urban poverty and larger structural forces such as planning policy and urban design frameworks. Furthermore, the course will provide students an opportunity to participate, explore, and diagnose bottom-up forms of public engagement that help shape a more equitable design of Latino city places.

 

OBJECTIVES

This course has the following objectives: to explore the role that design, planning, and public engagement have in addressing the needs of Latino communities in the U.S.; to undertake a critical analysis of the socio-economic conditions of Latinos in contemporary American society; and understand how diversity and culture can impact regions, governments, economies for producing a just city.

 

COURSE STRUCTURE

The course is designed as a class; students are responsible for their course readings and for participating fully and thoroughly in weekly discussions. Therefore, the course will consist of instructor lectures and student led discussions.

 

ASSIGNMENTS

  • Case Study 1: Latino Urbanism and the Public Real

25% of Final Grade

  • Case Study 2: Latino Urbanism and the Home

25% of Final Grade

  • Public Engagement Project: Grassroots Community-based Panning/Design   

40% of Final Grade

  • Participation (15 weeks)

10% of Final Grade

 

REQUIRED READING

  • Chase, J., Crawford, M., & Kaliski, J. (1999). Everyday Urbanism. New York: Monacelli Press.
  • Dias, D., Torres, R. (Eds.). (2012). Latino Urbanism: The Politics of Planning, Policy, and Redevelopment. N.Y.: New York University Press.
  • Dowling, J. (2014). Mexican Americans and the Question of Race. Texas: University of Texas Press.
  • Hutton, T. A. (2008). The New Economy of the Inner City: Restructuring, Regeneration  and Dislocation in the
  • Twenty-First-Century Metropolis. London ; New York : Routledge.
  • Jacobs, J., (1961). The Death and Life of Great American Cities. New York: Modern Library.
  • Mukhija, V., & Loukaitou-Sideris, A. (Eds.). (2014). The Informal American City: From Taco Trucks to Day Labor. Cambridge, Massachusetts : The MIT Press.

 


MAS 374 • Mexican Amer Indig Heritage

40605 • Menchaca, Martha
Meets TTH 9:30AM-11:00AM CLA 0.112
(also listed as ANT 322M, LAS 324L)
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This course examines the cultural prehistory and racial history of Mexican Americans from 1519 to the present. The purpose of the course is to examine how policies and laws enacted by the governments of Spain, Mexico, and the U.S. impacted the ethnic and racial identities of Mexican Americans. The geographic focus of the course is Mexico and the United States Southwest.


MAS 374 • Policing Latinidad

40578 • Lebron, Marisol
Meets MWF 10:00AM-11:00AM BIO 301
(also listed as AMS 321, WGS 340)
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Course Description:

How does the criminal justice system make itself felt in the everyday lives of Latinxs? From border enforcement, to stop and frisk, to the phenomenon of mass incarceration, many Latinxs find themselves and their communities enmeshed within a dense web of surveillance, punishment, and detention. This interdisciplinary course will examine the historical, political, economic, and social factors that have, in many ways, criminalized Latinidad and/or rendered Latinidad illegal.

We will examine how race, class, education, gender, sexuality, and citizenship shape the American legal system and impact how Latinxs navigate that system. This course will pay special attention to the troubled and unequal relationshi between Latinxs and the criminal justice apparatus in the United States and how it has resulted in the formation of resistant political identities and activist practices.

Readings:

Timothy Black, When a Heart Turns Rock Solid: The Lives of Three Puerto Rican Brothers On and Off the Streets, New York: Vintage Books, 2009.

Kelly Lytle Hernandez, Migra!: A History of the U.S. Border Patrol, Berkeley: University of California Press, 2010.

Patrisia Macia-Rojas, From Deportation to Prison: The Politics of Immigration Enforcement in Post-Civil Rights America, New York: New York University Press 2016.

Eduardo Obregon Pagan, Murder at the Sleepy Lagoon: Zoot Suits, Race, and Riots in Wartime L.A., Chapel Hill: University of North Carolina Press, 2003.

Victor M. Rios, Punished: Policing he Lives o Black and Latino Boys, New York: New York University Press, 2011.

All other readings for this course will be available online.

Assignments and Grading:

Class Participation: 15%

Presentations: 25%

Midterm Essay: 25%

Final Essays: 35%


MAS 374 • Puerto Rico In Crisis

40580 • Jimenez, Monica
Meets TTH 3:30PM-5:00PM PAR 304
(also listed as AFR 374E, AMS 370, HIS 363K)
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Course Description:  

This course will provide a history of the island’s relationship with the United States focusing in particular on questions of law and capitalism. The course will center around two questions: What is Puerto Rico to the United States? And how did we get to the present moment of crisis? In answering these questions we will focus in particular in the ways that law has racialized islanders and conceived them as unprepared and undeserving of rights. This conception has thus shaped the way that capitalism has worked as a force in shaping the islands possibilities throughout the 120 years of its relationship with the US. 

 

Readings (subject to change): 

  • Jorge Duany, Puerto Rico: What Everyone Needs to Know, (New York: Oxford UP, 2017). 

  • Reconsidering the Insular Cases: The Past and Future of the American Empire, Gerald Nueman and Tomiko Brow-Nagin, eds. (Caimbridge: Harvard UP, 2015). 

  • Charles Venator-Santiago, Puerto Rico and the Origins of US Global Empire: The Disembodied Shade, (New York: Routlidge, 2015). 

  • Joanna Poblete, Islanders in the Empire: Filipino and Puerto Rican Laborers in Hawai’I, (Urbana: University of Illinois, 2017). 

  • Kelvin Santiago-Valles, “ ‘Our Race Today [is] the Only Hope for the World:’ An 

African Spaniard as Chieftain of the Struggle Against ‘Sugar Slavery’ in Puerto Rico, 1926-1934” Caribbean Studies, Vol. 35, No. 1 (2007), pp. 107-140. 

  • Gervasio Luis Garcia, “I am the Other: Puerto Rico in the Eyes of North Americans, 1898,” The Journal of American History, Vol. 87, No. 1 (Jun., 2000), pp. 39-64. 

  • Solsirée del Moral, “Negotiating Colonialism ‘Race,’ Class, and Education in EarlyTwentieth-Century Puerto Rico,” in Alfred W. McCoy and Francisco A. Scarano, eds. Colonial Crucible: Empire in the Making of the Modern American State. (Madison: University of Wisconsin Press, 2009.) 

  • Eileen J. Findlay, “Love in the Tropics: Marriage, Divorce, and the Construction of Benevolent Colonialism in Puerto Rico, 1898-1910,” in Close Encounters of Empire: Writing the Cultural History of the U.S. and Latin American Relations, (Durham: Duke University Press, 1998.) 

  • Ellen Walsh, “The Not-So-Docile Puerto Rican: Students Resist Americanization, 1930,”Centro Journal, Vol. XXVI, No. I (Spr. 2014), pp. 148-171.  

 

 

Grade breakdown (subject to change): 

  • Attendance and class participation (20%) 

  • News Journal (20%): Given that the history of Puerto Rico in crises is quite literally being written daily, an essential part of this course will be to keep track of the events on the island as they relate to the topics of our course. Students will explore the ways in which media sources report on and interpret contemporary issues and events in Puerto Rico and the Puerto Rican community in the United States. Each week you will read a minimum of two articles about PR and Puerto Ricans and craft a brief (3-4 sentence) written summary of them in your own words.  

  • One of the articles must explore the relationship between the island and the United States (e.g. through politics, economics, migration); the other article can report any aspect of current life in PR or for mainland based Puerto Ricans. Please note the title, date and source of your newspaper articles and include a web address. 

  • The articles and summaries will be kept in an on-going journal and collected four times during the semester.  

  • Sources should be legitimate media/ news sources and not simply entertainment or opinion blogs or websites. Acceptable examples include NY Times, Washington Post, Huffington Post, BBC, Guardian, etc. Sources in Spanish are acceptable. Bring your journals to each class. We will begin each meeting with a brief news update. 

  • Please come to class prepared to discuss the current events on the island as these will feature prominently in our course.  

 

  • Short Paper (20%) – One 4-5 page paper 

 

  • In-class examination (20%) or 2nd short paper (will depend on size of class)  

 

  • Final examination (20%)


MAS 374 • Race/Class/Gender In Amer Tv

40584 • Beltran, Mary
Meets TTH 9:30AM-11:00AM CMA 3.116
(also listed as WGS 324)
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Please check back for updates.


MAS 374 • Sociocul Influences On Learn

40590
Meets TH 1:00PM-4:00PM SZB 426
(also listed as AFR 372D, ALD 327)
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COURSE DESCRIPTION:

This course is an introduction to the history of US schools as sites of social reproduction, resistance, and transformation, as well as an exploration of the meanings of knowledge, learning, and education across diverse US communities. We specifically focus on the influences of race, gender, sexuality, class, and colonialism on schooling and on the educational experiences of African American, Mexican American, and Indigenous communities. We will also consider how teachers and people working outside the field of education can transform our schools and society through our work and through our daily lives. Students will complete weekly readings and reading reflections, several short writing assignments, and a service learning project with an educational organization and will go on a walking tour of a local Austin neighborhood. In order to get the most out of the class, students should be willing to enter into dialogues about race, class, gender, and sexuality and to reflect on their own knowledge, experiences, beliefs, and identities.

In this class, we will actively build collegial relationships and work to accept, learn from, share with, and support one another. We will not be expected to compete with one another or to work in isolation, but to form relationships of solidarity as students and educators. Additionally, we will challenge one another to deepen our commitment to social, decolonial, and environmental justice in education. Since we will be reading extensively about power dynamics inside and outside of schools, I will draw attention and will ask you to draw attention to the power dynamics of our classroom. Collectively, we might call upon others and call upon ourselves to question beliefs and dispositions that we previously took for granted. We will talk about our emotional responses to the readings, to our service learning, and to the class itself, and we will try to learn from our own and others’ joy, discomfort, anger, and hope.

REQUIRED TEXTS:

  • Gloria Ladson-Billings, The Dreamkeepers

  • Additional readings available on Canvas

    LEARNING GOALS:

  • Discuss the influence of changing ideologies and structures of race, class, gender, sexuality, and colonialism on public schooling and education in the United States.

  • Analyze service learning, neighborhood walks, and past and present schooling experiences through a variety of sociocultural lenses, such as reproduction, resistance, and cultural wealth.

  • Reflect on our individual and collective learning over the course of the semester in order to deepen understanding of our own identities, visions, and practices.

ASSIGNMENTS:

All assignments should be submitted as a printed hard copy, with the exception of the Final Course Reflection, which can be submitted on Canvas. Assignments will be evaluated for completeness and for analytical depth. Detailed instructions for each assignment will provided in class in advance of the deadline and posted on Canvas.

Weekly Reading Responses (35%): Each class period, you will turn in a one-page response to the week’s readings. Your paper should reference and describe key concepts that stood out to you from each of the readings, and then reflect on what the readings meant to you. Avoid summarizing; instead, engage in conversation with the texts and describe your own response.

Educational Autobiography (15%): In this essay, you will reflect on your own educational experiences in light of what you have learned in the course thus far. For this paper, education may refer to both your schooling experiences and your personal development in family, social, and cultural contexts. To the extent possible, consider how your gender, sexuality, race, class positionalities influenced your schooling and education. The paper should be 4 to 6 double-spaced pages.

Service Learning (15%): You are required to complete 20 hours of service learning during the course of the semester. It is your responsibility to arrange and attend these service hours with an approved organization from the list provided in class, or to secure instructor approval to begin or continue service learning with an organization that is not on the list. You must track your service learning hours each time that you attend and receive a signature from the supervising staff member. After each visit to your service learning organization, it is recommended that you take informal notes on what happened during your service learning and how you felt / what you were thinking about in order to prepare for your Service Learning Reflections.

Service Learning Reflections (20%): At mid-semester and at the end of the semester, you will write a 2- to 3-page double-spaced reflection on your service learning experience in response to specific themes and questions. More detailed instructions will be provided in class for each assignment.

Final Course Reflection (15%): At the end of the course, you will reflect on what you have learned about education and schooling during the course and during your service learning, and describe your own intellectual and emotional growth. How has the course affected your own understanding of learning, teaching, schooling, and culture? The paper should be at least 4 double-spaced pages. **This is the only paper that can be submitted on Canvas.**


MAS 374 • Tejana Cultural Studies

40592 • Rosas, Lilia
Meets MW 2:00PM-3:30PM CAL 419
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Course Description:

With the publication of Entre Guadalupe y Malinche, editors Inés Hernández-Ávila and Norma Elia Cantú solidify their mandate to legitimize Tejan@/x Studies as an arena worthy of ongoing research, study, and comprehension. Furthermore, they center the narratives of Tejanas as a necessary part of the conversation to understand this emergent field of inquiry and integral to Chicana Studies. In this course, we investigate the history of Tejanas to reaffirm and reclaim their place and role in the histories of Native Americans, woman, Chican@/xs, Greater Mexico, and the United States. We will further explore how transfronterizismo and transregionalism complicate this history. Last, we will contemplate how their stories are fundamental to illuminating the struggles, resistance, and liberation of Chicanas, xicanindias, mestizas, and afromexicanas from precontact to decolonization.

 

Readings:

Acosta, Teresa Palomo and Ruthe Winegarten. Las Tejanas: 300 Years of History. Austin: University of Texas Press, 2003.

Brown, Ariana. Three-headed Serpent: Digital Chapbook. 2016.

González, Gabriela. Redeeming La Raza: Transborder Modernity, Race, Respectability, and Rights. New York: Oxford University, 2018.

Hernández-Ávila, Inés and Normal Elia Cantú, eds. Entre Guadalupe y Malinche: Tejanas in Literature and Art. Austin: University of Texas Press, 2016.

Nájera, Jennifer R. The Borderlands of Race: Mexican Segregation in A South Texas Town. Austin: University of Texas Press, 2015.

Orozco, Cynthia E. No Mexicans, Women, or Dogs Allowed: The Rise of the Mexican American Civil Rights Movement. Austin: University of Texas Press, 2009.

Pérez, Emma. Forgetting the Alamo, or, Blood. Memory: A Novel. Austin: University of. Texas Press, 2009. Vargas, Deborah R. Dissonant Divas in Chicana Music: The Limits of La Onda. Minneapolis: University of Minnesota Press, 2012.

 

Grading:

  • Attendance and Participation 15%
  • Reading Journal 10%
  • Research Proposal and Bibliography 5%
  • Primary Document Analysis 10%
  • Rough Draft of Final Paper 10%
  • Oral Presentation 20%
  • Final Paper 30%

MAS 374 • Texas, 1914 To The Present

40600 • Zamora, Emilio
Meets TTH 12:30PM-2:00PM ART 1.120
(also listed as HIS 320R, URB 353)
show description

The reading and lecture course surveys change and continuity in the history of Texas within the context of U.S. history and Mexico-U.S. relations.  Special attention is given to Mexico-U.S. relations, politics and social relations between 1900 and 1970, as well as the home front experience of Texans during the Second World War.  The overriding theme is the incorporation of Texas into the national socio-economy from the state’s early “colonized” status to its modern position as a fully integrated part of the nation.  The course is organized around our readings.  The De la Teja/Marks/Tyler text provides a synthesis of Texas history while the Zamora text provides a closer examination of home front experiences.  The two chapters from the Campbell book will serve as a basis for an examination of the post-war period extending into 2001.
            Three semester hours of Texas history may be substituted for half of the American history requirement.  Course materials, including a copy of my resume, this syllabus, lecture notes, bibliographies, and notes on interviewing techniques, will be available on Blackboard (http://courses.utexas.edu), UT’s course management site.  Call the ITS help desk (475-9400) if you have problems accessing the site.

Texts:
Randolph B. Campbell, Chapter 16, “Modern Texas, 1971-2001,” In Gone To Texas, A History of the Lone Star Stateby Randolph B. Campbell (New York: Oxford University Press, 2003): 438-67.
Jesús de la Teja, Paula Marks, and Ron Tyler, Texas, Crossroads of North America (New York: Houghton Mifflin Company, 2004).
Emilio Zamora, Claiming Rights and Righting Wrongs in Texas, Mexican Workers and Job Politics during WWII(College Station: Texas A&M University Press, 2009).

Grading:
Research paper (35%), 5 chapter reports (25%), and 4 film reports (40%).


MAS 374 • Transnatl Latinx Pop Culture

40594 • Gutierrez, Laura
Meets TTH 2:00PM-3:30PM GEA 114
(also listed as AFR 372E, LAS 328, WGS 340)
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DESCRIPTION:

This course uses a set of interdisciplinary methods (mainly from ethnic studies, Latina/o studies, cultural studies, and performance studies) to help us understand the kind of 'work' culture is doing in a larger framework, historical, economical, and societal. The class uses these theoretical and methodological lenses to examine Transnational Latina/o popular culture from the 20th and early 21st centuries in order to consider the ways in which popular culture has been an important aspect of nation-building strategies on different scales, from nation-states to Latina/o communities in the US. We pay particular attention to expressive culture from the beginning of the 20th century, focusing on social dance forms like samba, tango, and danzón. Additionally, sports spectacles are analyzed to understand the performance of masculinity, the interconnected between politics and ‘entertainment’ (soccer) and the theatricality of the spectacle (lucha libre—Mexican masked wrestling). The course material moves through the 20th century and into the 21st century and across geo-political divides to put forward the idea that Latina/o popular culture is transnational (at the same time as translocal); cultural works that will be examined in order to grasp a full understanding of his notion run the gamut from the formation of salsa to the reggeatón phenomenon and telenovela (Latin American soap operas) industry to music television. In a more general way, the ultimate goal of the class is to get the student to think about the ways in which popular cultural forms are part of a 20th and 21st century sensibility that is both part of “the practice of everyday life” and nation-building projects. But the student will be asked to think about how different publics consume popular culture (at times transforming it and/or changing its meaning) and, likewise, it is important to consider what happens when popular culture—thanks to the (transnational) cultural industries—travel across geo-political and linguistic borders. The operating question throughout the semester is then, is what is transnational about Latina/o popular culture and why does it matter?

TEXTS (selections):

*Imagination Beyond Nation: Latin American Popular Culture, edited by Eva P. Bueno and Terry Caesar

*Musical ImagiNation: U.S.-Colombian Identity and the Latin Music Boom by María Elena Cepeda

*Latino/a Popular Culture, edited by Michelle Habell-Pallán and Mary Romero

*Memory and Modernity: Popular Culture in Latin America, edited by William Rowe and Vivian Schelling

*Fragments of a Golden Age: The Politics of Culture in Mexico since 1940, edited by Gilbert Joseph, Anne Rubenstein, and Eric Zolov

*From Bananas to Buttocks: The Latina Body in Popular Film and Culture, edited by Myra Mendible

*Oye Como Va! Hybridity and Identity in Latino Popular Music by Deborah Pacini Hernández

*Musica Norteña: Mexican Migrants Creating a Nation between Nations by Cathy Ragland

GRADING

Attendance and Participation: 15%

One in-class short presentation: 10%

Three short essays during the semester: 30%

Final research paper: 45%

 


MAS 374 • United States Immigration

40607 • Rodriguez, Nestor
Meets MW 11:30AM-1:00PM CAL 100
(also listed as SOC 322U)
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Description

Immigration patterns have significantly affected the development of U.S. society since its inception.  In the 1990s, the United States experienced a record number of new immigrants admitted into the country, and the last decade (2000-2009) recorded even a larger number of immigrants admitted.  This course uses a sociological perspective to address various impacts of immigration in U.S. society.

Course Aims and Objectives

Aims

 This course is designed to provide a sociological understanding concerning the nature of immigration in U.S. society, including an understanding of how immigration affects large (macro) and small (micro) social units in the society.

Specific Learning Objectives

  • Gain background information on the development of immigration patterns in U.S. society and discuss the social forces that affect these patterns from the perspective of historical and recent immigration trends.
  •  Review and discuss different perceptions about immigration patterns.
  •  Review and analyze government statistical reports concerning annual immigration conditions and characteristics.
  • Develop an awareness of the significance of immigration for the development of U.S. society.

 Review major laws affecting migration patterns to U.S. society

 Reading: 

 Portes, Alejandro, and Rubén Rumbaut. 2014. Immigrant America: A Portrait. Berkeley: University of California Press. (PR

Mobasher, Mohsen M.  2012. Iranians in Texas: Migratio, Politics, and Ethnic Identity. Austin: University of Texas Press. (MM)

Grading

a) Three regular exams (40 multiple-choice items and a take-home essay question for each):

100 points per exam x 3 regular exams = 300 points

b) Total possible points = 300

 


MAS 374 • Women Of Color Feminisms In US

40595 • Guidotti-Hernandez, Nicole
Meets MWF 11:00AM-12:00PM CMA 3.114
(also listed as AFR 372C, AMS 321, WGS 340)
show description

DESCRIPTION: 

This relational ethnic studies course examines the most influential works produced by those women of color whose political and cultural investments in a collaborative, cross-cultural critique of U.S. imperialism and heteronormativity has been called “US Third World Feminism.”  In order to situate these works historically, materially, and culturally, we will also read works by key “third world” anti-colonialist writers.  In addition to developing a facility with historical and contemporary discourses of nationalism, gender, race, sexuality, and class, our goal will be to engage in a sustained and critical exploration of the limits and promises of “US Third World Feminism.”  What is “third world” about this feminism, and what is gained by using this politically fraught label?  How does its discourse carry over into everyday practice?  How do the documents produced under its name draw from the anti-colonial writings of “third world” writers?  What is the relationship between this mode of feminism and more recent elaborations of global and transnational feminisms? 

 

TEXT: 

Alarcón,,  Norma, Kaplan, Caren and Moallem, Minoo. Between Woman and Nation 

Anzaldúa, Gloria and Moraga, Cherríe eds. This Bridge Called My Back 

Davis, Angela. The Angela Davis Reader. 

Ehrenreich, Barbara  and Annette Fuentes Women in the Global Factory 

Límon, Graciela. In Search of Bernabé 

Mohanty, Chandra .Feminism Without Borders. 

Peña, Milagros. Latina Activists Across Borders 

 

FILMS 

La Operación 

Black Skins/White Masks 

 

GRADING 

25% Final Paper 

5% Prospectus and Bibliography 

30% Long Papers 

10% Presentation of final paper 

30% Attendance and Class Participation