Department of Middle Eastern Studies
Department of Middle Eastern Studies

Current Graduate Students

Radwa El Barouni


M.A. in Middle Eastern Languages and Cultures; University of Texas at Austin. M.A. University of Alexandria, University of Texas at Austin

Radwa El Barouni

Contact

Interests


Arabic Literature

Biography


Radwa El Barouni is currently visiting faculty at Williams College in the Arabic Studies department, in addition to being a fifth-year graduate student. Prior to moving to the States for her graduate studies at the University of Texas, Austin, Radwa El Barouni taught at Alexandria University in Egypt and in Morocco. She is currently writing her dissertation titled “Renarrating al-Andalus in the Arabic Novel from the Nahḍa to the Present: Iterations of Subjectivity, Community & State” which investigates the literary historical imaginary of al-Andalus, exploring nearly a dozen novels that span over a hundred years from diverse countries in the Arabic speaking world. Through these literary representations, she investigates the intellectual, aesthetic and socio-political production of an Arab historical imaginary and the literary staging of the Arab past and future.  Using a hybrid methodology, she engages theoretically with broader issues about the use of time in historical fiction, and the genre's porous borders and its incorporation of a diverse display of genres found in classical Arabic adab and historiography like biography, akhbār, and travelogues and the implications of that for the specificity of Arabic historical fiction and the selective processes involved in its writing. The dissertation argues that the recent surge of Arabic historical fiction, which is coextensive with the absence or inaccessibility of archives, serves to intervene in and counter historical narratives engineered on a national level that use different discursive methods controlled by the state, and helps destabilize regime monopoly over historical meaning. She also examines how these literary historical narratives influenced and were affected by notions of subjectivity, the state and community and the intersection between the three.

Her other research interests lie in dystopic fiction, graphic novels, development of genres and literary theory. El Barouni also has a deep interest in teaching Arabic, specifically cultural and intercultural competency and has created several modules for the educational cultural website http://khallina.org/and is currently the Arabic consultant for the Flagship Culture Initiative that aims to develop an open source online culture curriculum across Arabic, Chinese, and Russian programs. Translation is another of Radwa’s interests theoretically and as a practice. Some of her translations can be seen in the New York Feminist Press’ Women Writing Africa Volume IV, and here. She will also be contributing translations to the forthcoming Words Without Bordersissue on Omani literature, as well as the Cambridge Arab Left Reader.

Courses


ARA 611C • Intensive Arabic II

40810 • Spring 2018
Meets MWF 9:00AM-10:00AM MEZ 2.122

This course builds communicative skills in formal and colloquial Arabic as well as Arab culture through listening, speaking, reading and writing activities in and outside of class. The course focuses on Intermediate level tasks and topics, which involve daily life, as well as developing efficient reading strategies and listening skills. At the end of the semester students should expect to have reached Intermediate proficiency, to be able to communicate with others about daily life topics and understand simple texts on familiar topics, and to have an active vocabulary of approximately 600 words. In addition to daily reading, listening, and writing homework, the course requires participation in group work in class, presentations, quizzes, and tests. Students should expect to spend at least two hours of homework daily. Requirements also include active participation in group work during class, and occasional presentations, quizzes, and tests. Not open to native speakers of Arabic.

Grading:

To be provided by instructor.

Texts:

Al-Kitaab fi Ta'allum al-Arabiyya I, Dictionary of Modern Arabic, Wehr/Cowan

Course Meeting Times:

This course meets M-F. Please check the online course schedule for the TTH meeting times.

ARA 601C • Intensive Arabic I

41155 • Fall 2017
Meets MWF 10:00AM-11:00AM MEZ 1.102

This course is the first semester of intensive Arabic language instruction. Not open to native speakers of Arabic. Heritage speakers of Arabic and students who have studied Arabic before must contact the language placement coordinator for a placement test before beginning this course.

ARA 531L • Intensive Arabic Vi

40520 • Spring 2016
Meets MF 11:00AM-12:00PM JES A203A
Wr

This course takes students from the study of language through culture to the study of culture through language as the focus gradually shifts from exercises and drills to discussion of reading and listening texts. The course aims to push students toward the cultural and linguistic competence of educated native speakers, and allows for students to incorporate their own areas of research into the class. Not open to native speakers of Arabic.

Grading Policy

To be provided by instructor.

Texts

Al-Kitaab fi Ta'allum al-Arabiyya Part II.

ARA 531K • Intensive Arabic V

40375 • Fall 2015
Meets MF 12:00PM-1:00PM MEZ 2.118

This course is the fifth semester of intensive Arabic language instruction and is not open to native speakers of Arabic.

ARA 611C • Intensive Arabic II

40370 • Spring 2015
Meets MWF 11:00AM-12:00PM MEZ 2.118

This course builds communicative skills in formal and colloquial Arabic as well as Arab culture through listening, speaking, reading and writing activities in and outside of class. The course focuses on Intermediate level tasks and topics, which involve daily life, as well as developing efficient reading strategies and listening skills. At the end of the semester students should expect to have reached Intermediate proficiency, to be able to communicate with others about daily life topics and understand simple texts on familiar topics, and to have an active vocabulary of approximately 600 words. In addition to daily reading, listening, and writing homework, the course requires participation in group work in class, presentations, quizzes, and tests. Students should expect to spend at least two hours of homework daily. Requirements also include active participation in group work during class, and occasional presentations, quizzes, and tests. Not open to native speakers of Arabic.

Grading:

To be provided by instructor.

Texts:

Al-Kitaab fi Ta'allum al-Arabiyya I, Dictionary of Modern Arabic, Wehr/Cowan

Course Meeting Times:

This course meets M-F. Please check the online course schedule for the TTH meeting times.

ARA 601C • Intensive Arabic I

41440 • Fall 2014
Meets MWF 8:00AM-9:00AM MEZ 1.206

This course is the first semester of intensive Arabic language instruction. Not open to native speakers of Arabic. Heritage speakers of Arabic and students who have studied Arabic before must contact the language placement coordinator for a placement test before beginning this course.

Texts

Brustad, Al-Batal, Al-Tonsi: Alif Baa:  Introduction to Arabic Letters and Sounds 3rd edition

Brustad, Al-Batal, Al-Tonsi: Al-Kitaab fi Ta'allum al-Arabiyya: Part One with DVDs 3rd edition

alkitaabtextbook.com student access key 

Available at Austin TXbooks (Beat the Bookstore) at 2116 Guadalupe St.

Grading

To be provided by instructor.

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