Department of Sociology

Mounira M. Charrad


Ph.D., Harvard University

Associate Professor
Mounira M. Charrad

Contact

  • Phone: 512-232-6311
  • Office: CLA 3.526
  • Campus Mail Code: A1700

Interests


Gender & Women's Rights; Political Sociology; Social Theory; Colonialism; Comparative-Historical Sociology; Globalization; Middle East and North Africa.

Biography


Mounira (Maya) Charrad is an award-winning author. She received her Ph.D. from Harvard University and her undergraduate degree from the Sorbonne in Paris. Her research has centered on state formation, colonialism, law, citizenship, kinship and women’s rights. More specifically, she has considered strategies of state building in kin-based societies and how struggles over state power shaped the expansion or curtailment of women's rights. Challenging explanations of politics based on a textual approach to religion, she calls attention instead to social solidarities and where they are grounded (kinship, ethnicity, or associations). She is currently studying women’s associations, secularism, and civil society with a focus on Tunisia. Her work has been translated into French, Arabic, and Chinese, and featured on websites and in the media. Her research has been funded by several grants including the National Endowment for the Humanities, the Mellon Foundation, the American Association of University Women, and the American Institute of Maghribi Studies.

Professor Charrad teaches various undergraduate and graduate courses in political sociology, comparative historical sociology, social theory, and gender politics. She supervises doctoral students doing interesting work on a range of U.S. and international topics. She has served on the boards of several major journals and has held positions in professional associations.

She is affiliated with the Plan II Honors Program; the Center for European Studies; the Center for Middle East Studies; the Center for Women’s and Gender Studies; the Rapoport Center for Human Rights and Justice; and the Center for Russian, East European, and Eurasian Studies. She also holds a courtesy appointment in the Department of Middle East Studies. She is a non-resident fellow at the Baker Institute, Rice University.

Courses


T C 302 • What Is Power

42935 • Spring 2017
Meets MW 12:30PM-2:00PM CLA 0.122

Description:
The seminar considers the many faces of power. With an interdisciplinary social science approach, we discuss how power is constructed and exerted in the public and private spheres. We start with politics in the public sphere with classic theories such as those of Karl Marx and Max Weber and continue with contemporary formulations. We explore forms of domination at the international, national, institutional, interpersonal and personal levels. How the personal is political becomes a focus of the discussion. We use audiovisuals and short stories to illustrate points made in the social science literature. We invite guest lecturers to tell us about their research.

Texts/Readings/Films:

Karl Marx, The Communist Manifesto. On Line at UT Library.
Max Weber, “Forms of Authority.” On Blackboard
N. Machiavelli, The Prince.
C. Williams, Inside Toyland.
Andrew Fagan, The Atlas of Human Rights. Selections.
Ben Crow & Suresh K. Lodha, The Atlas of Global Inequalities. Selections.
Short articles from newspapers or websites.

Assignments:
Participation/posting questions 20%
Class Presentation/Leading discussion 20%
Papers (3 total) 60%

Site Visits to the Gems of UT:
Blanton Museum
PCL Library (session designed for our seminar on how to do conduct research).

About the Professor:

Mounira M. Charrad is Associate Professor of Sociology at the University of Texas in Austin. Her book, States and Women's Rights: The Making of Postcolonial Tunisia, Algeria and Morocco <http:// www.ucpress.edu/books/pages/5702.html> (University of California Press), won the Distinguished Book Award from the American Sociological Association and the Best Book on Politics and History Greenstone Award from the American Political Science Association, and the Hamilton Award from the University of Texas. Her articles have centered on state formation, law, citizenship, kinship and gender. Her current research considers conceptions of modernity in legal discourses in the Middle East. Her edited volumes include Women's Agency: Silences and Voices, Patrimonial Power in the Modern World and Patrimonialism, Global History and Imperial Rule. 

SOC 320K • Political Sociology

45369 • Fall 2016
Meets TTH 3:30PM-5:00PM CLA 0.118
(also listed as GOV 355P)

Course Description:

This course surveys classical theories and major contemporary debates in political sociology.  It is designed to provide students with a general understanding of the different theoretical perspectives on the study of power and politics. The empirical focus of the course includes the US and other countries and the approach is comparative-historical.  We consider issues such as state building, nations, civil society, political parties, elites, social movements, protest, and democracy.  We discuss recent developments both in the US and internationally. Students use major theories and concepts in Political Sociology to make analyze these events.

Course Requirements and Grading Policy

Students are encouraged to take an active role in discussing readings and raising questions.  I expect students to attend class and to complete the assigned readings prior to coming to class.  This is a Writing Flag course that involves writing papers, revising them, and giving comments to your peers on their writing.  Course requirements include one position paper and 2 papers, a team presentation and participation in class discussions. Grading is as follows: Position Paper (500 words): 10%; Paper no. 1 (750 words):  20%; Paper no. 2 (1200 words):  40%; Team presentation: 10%; Class participation: 10 %; Peer review of papers: 10%.  

Papers are evaluated in terms of quality of research, depth of thought, strength of argument, and clarity of expression (i.e., writing style).  Presentations are done in teams.

Text/Readings:

Karl Marx, Communist Manifesto, On line at UT Library

Tocqueville, Democracy in America.  On line at UT Library. Author’s Introduction, chs. 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 8. 

Max Weber, The Protestant Ethic and the Spirit of Capitalism.  One Line at UT library.  Preface, Intro, chs 1, 2, 4 a.  TO CHECK AND CONSIDER SHORTENING READING.

Dan Smith, The State of the World Atlas.  8th ed. Penguin. 2008 (Atlas).

Daniel Chirot, Contentious Identities:  Ethnic, Religious and Nationalist Conflicts in Today’s World. Routledge. 2011.

M. M. Charrad, States and Women’s Rights:  The Making of Postcolonial Tunisia, Algeria and Morocco. Berkeley:  Univ of California Press, 2001 (SWR)

M. M. Charrad, “Central and Local Patrimonialism:  State-building in Kin-based Societies.” In Patrimonial Power in the Modern World.  Annals, Vol 636, July 2011. On Line at UT Library.

Audiovisuals:

Audiovisuals are an integral part of the course. They are used to cover current events.  

 

 

 

SOC 336G • Gender Pol In Islamic World

45460 • Fall 2016
Meets TTH 2:00PM-3:30PM CLA 0.102
(also listed as ISL 373, MES 341, R S 358, WGS 340)

Description:

The course is devoted to the study of gender politics in the Islamic world. It is designed to help students gain a better knowledge of the Islamic world and, at the same time, increase their understanding of major sociological concepts such as gender, social organization, culture, and politics. It shows how culture is mediated by politics, resulting in diverse interpretations of the cultural tradition and in different policies with respect to gender. We start by examining the themes and issues that are part of the common denominator of the Islamic tradition.  We then consider how the diversity can be explained and what factors contribute to it.  The focus is on women’s rights, which have been a key political issue in several countries and internationally.

Texts:  TBA

Grading and Requirements:

This course carries the Global Cultures flag. Global Cultures courses are designed to increase your familiarity with cultural groups outside the United States. You should therefore expect a substantial portion of your grade to come from assignments covering the practices, beliefs, and histories of at least one non-U.S. cultural group, past or present.

This course carries the Writing Flag. Writing Flag courses are designed to give students experience with writing in an academic discipline. In this class, you can expect to write regularly during the semester, complete substantial writing projects, and receive feedback from your instructor to help you improve your writing. You will also have the opportunity to revise one or more assignments, and you may be asked to read and discuss your peers’ work. You should therefore expect a substantial portion of your grade to come from your written work. Writing Flag classes meet the Core Communications objectives of Critical Thinking, Communication, Teamwork, and Personal Responsibility, established by the Texas Higher Education Coordinating Board.

 

SOC 388L • Historical And Comparatv Meths

44695 • Spring 2016
Meets W 3:00PM-6:00PM CLA 1.302A

Description:   

The course is devoted to the study of comparative and historical methods in sociology (CHS). It is designed to provide graduate students with a general understanding of the theoretical paradigms that scholars have developed in that genre of sociology. We pay particular attention to how evidence is used to construct theory. We will be reading closely books that span five decades of comparative and historical sociology and have received attention in the field. All these books are meant as exemplars that “do” comparative and historical sociology.  Each of them puts the methodology in practice to study a substantive sociological issue. Our purpose is to deconstruct each text in order to understand how the author has used comparisons implicitly or explicitly (in most cases) in order to build a theoretical argument.  It is also to play close attention to the sources and type of data used.  In addition, we will consider articles that comment on comparative and historical methods.  These articles should help you develop an intellectual map of the analytic strategies displayed in the books we are using as exemplars of the methodology. Thematically, the seminar focuses on states, state formation, and politics. We will invite guest speakers who use comparative/historical methods to come and tell us about their work from time to time.  An updated syllabus will be provided as necessary.

Grading Policy:

The course meets one a week and attendance is required. The first requirement is to do the readings and to come to class prepared to discuss them.  Students will also be asked to lead designated class discussions.  The second requirement is in the form of written pieces. The course grade depends upon the following:  A critique of readings with oral presentations 25%, a take home midterm 25 %, a research proposal 40%. Class participation  counts for10%. The proposal must draw closely on the seminar readings and at the same time help you formulate your future plans for research, whatever particular method you choose for it.

Texts Required:

B. Moore Jr, Social Origins of Dictatorship and Democracy                                   

T. Skocpol, States and Social Revolutions                                                     

M. M. Charrad, States and Women’s Rights                                                 

Julia Adams, The Familial State

T C 357 • Veils: Hist, Cul, And Polit

42080 • Fall 2015
Meets TTH 3:30PM-5:00PM CLA 0.108

Instructor: Mounira “Maya” Charrad, Associate Professor, Department of Sociology                             

Description:

The course considers the history o the veil, its cultural meanings, and its place in political discourse.  We start by examining the practice of veiling in early Christianity and Islam and the myths that surround its origin.  We then discuss how the veil was intertwined with the "Woman's question" and nationalism in the mid twentieth century in the height of struggles of national liberation in the Middle East.  In the contemporary period, the veil has become an object of fascination in Western societies and a highly charged symbol in the Islamic world.  We explore the multiple meanings of the veil both in political debates and in the individual lives of women. How the veil can range from a form of subordination to a sign of empowerment for women is addressed.

Course Objectives:  By the end of the term, students will have the ability to:

1)    Describe and characterize a broad array of issues concerning the veil and place veiling in broader social, economic and political contexts.

2)    Evaluate the place of broader processes and especially politics in shaping discourses on veiling and gender.

3)    Analyze the debates on gender in the Middle East and in other countries.

Required Readings (will be discussed in class):

        ·        Nikki Keddie, Women in the Middle East:  Past and Present.  Princeton U. Press.

        ·        Malek Alloula, The Colonial Harem, U. of Minnesota Press.

        ·        Jennifer Heath, ed., The Veil:  Women Writers on its History, Lore, and Politics.  U. of Calif.  Press.

  • Charrad, “Veils and Laws:  Multiple Meanings of the Veil”
  • Charrad, “Women Ally with the Devil”
  • Charrad, “Gender in the Middle East: Islam, State, Agency.” Annual Review of Sociology, 2011. 

News Media Articles:  Short articles from the New York Times and the BBC:  The text or link will be posted on Canvas. 

The readings for the seminar are interdisciplinary, drawing on Sociology, Anthropology, and History.  They include three major books.  Placing the lives of women and the veil in historical context, the first book, Women in the Middle East, focuses on the diversity and richness of women’s experiences in the Middle East.  The second book, The Colonial Harem, discusses Orientalism as a perspective on the Middle East and its representation of women’s sexuality.  The third, The Veil: Women Writers on its History, Lore, and Politics addresses current debates surrounding the veil and presents the views of women writers from a range of disciplines.  Selected articles offer a theoretical perspective on gender and veiling.  Others address the place of the veil in today’s ideologies and politics not only in the Islamic world, but also in the United States and Western Europe, where the headscarf has become an object of political confrontation.  From time to time, we use current newspaper articles or media segments in our discussions.

Audiovisuals: Audiovisuals are used frequently during the semester to illustrate variations in the veil from Afghanistan to Morocco and elsewhere.  We see pictures of the veil in different countries, and videos on the hijab and debates on veiling.

Requirements: The requirements for the seminar are a research paper (10-12 pp) and at least two presentations on the readings accompanied with a written summary (2 pp each = 4 pp.).  The research paper is developed in stages during the course of the seminar on a topic chosen by the student in consultation with the instructor.  Students are encouraged to do research on a topic of interest. They may conduct the research on their own or in teams.  Examples of topics include veiling practices in a given country, laws on veiling (either forcing women to put on a veil as in Iran or to drop it as in Turkey), and interviews of women who wear a veil.

About the Professor: Mounira M. Charrad is Associate Professor of Sociology at the University of Texas in Austin.  Her book, States and Women's Rights: The Making of Postcolonial Tunisia, Algeria and Morocco (University of California Press), won the Distinguished Book Award from the American Sociological Association and the Best Book on Politics and History Greenstone Award from the American Political Science Association.  Her articles have centered on state formation, law, citizenship, kinship and gender. Her current research considers conceptions of modernity in legal discourses in the Middle East. Her upcoming books include Patrimonial Power in the Modern World and the Politics of Empire (co edited with J. Adams).

WGS 340 • Gender Pol In Islamic World

46119 • Fall 2015
Meets TTH 11:00AM-12:30PM CLA 3.106

Multidisciplinary course examining experiences and issues of gender in different cultures.

SOC 388L • Historical And Comparatv Meths

46375 • Fall 2014
Meets M 6:00PM-9:00PM CLA 1.302A

Description:   

The course is devoted to the study of comparative and historical methods in sociology (CHS). It is designed to provide graduate students with a general understanding of the theoretical paradigms that scholars have developed in that genre of sociology. We pay particular attention to how evidence is used to construct theory. We will be reading closely books that span five decades of comparative and historical sociology and have received attention in the field. All these books are meant as exemplars that “do” comparative and historical sociology.  Each of them puts the methodology in practice to study a substantive sociological issue. Our purpose is to deconstruct each text in order to understand how the author has used comparisons implicitly or explicitly (in most cases) in order to build a theoretical argument.  It is also to play close attention to the sources and type of data used.  In addition, we will consider articles that comment on comparative and historical methods.  These articles should help you develop an intellectual map of the analytic strategies displayed in the books we are using as exemplars of the methodology. Thematically, the seminar focuses on states, state formation, and politics. We will invite guest speakers who use comparative/historical methods to come and tell us about their work from time to time.  An updated syllabus will be provided as necessary.

Grading Policy:

The course meets one a week and attendance is required. The first requirement is to do the readings and to come to class prepared to discuss them.  Students will also be asked to lead designated class discussions.  The second requirement is in the form of written pieces. The course grade depends upon the following:  A critique of readings with oral presentations 25%, a take home midterm 25 %, a research proposal 40%. Class participation  counts for10%. The proposal must draw closely on the seminar readings and at the same time help you formulate your future plans for research, whatever particular method you choose for it.

Texts Required:

B. Moore Jr, Social Origins of Dictatorship and Democracy                                   

T. Skocpol, States and Social Revolutions                                                     

M. M. Charrad, States and Women’s Rights                                                 

Julia Adams, The Familial State

SOC 336G • Gender Polit In Islamic World

46465 • Spring 2014
Meets MW 4:00PM-5:30PM CLA 0.126
(also listed as ISL 373, MES 341)

Description:

The course is devoted to the study of gender politics in the Islamic world. It is designed to help students gain a better knowledge of the Islamic world and, at the same time, increase their understanding of major sociological concepts such as gender, social organization, culture, and politics. It shows how culture is mediated by politics, resulting in diverse interpretations of the cultural tradition and in different policies with respect to gender. We start by examining the themes and issues that are part of the common denominator of the Islamic tradition. We then consider how the diversity can be explained and what factors contribute to it. The focus is on women’s rights, which have been a key political issue in several countries and internationally.

Texts:

E.W. Fernea, Guests of The Sheik: An Ethnography of an Iraqi Village. Anchor, (GS) 1965.

M. M. Charrad, States and Women’s Rights: The Making of Postcolonial Tunisia, Algeria and

Morocco. Berkeley: Univ of California Press, 2001 (SWR)

Fadela Amara, Breaking the Silence: French Voices from the Ghetto. Berkeley: UC Press 2006 (BTS).

Joni Seager, The Penguin Atlas of Women in the World. 4th ed. Penguin. 2009. (Atlas).

Articles will be placed on Blackboard.

Grading and Requirements:

Students are encouraged to take an active role in discussing readings and raising questions. I expect students to attend class and to complete the assigned readings prior to coming to class.

Exam 1 25%

Exam  2 40%

Exam 3 20%

Team presentation 10%

Class participation 5%

T C 302 • What Is Power?

43730 • Spring 2014
Meets MW 12:30PM-2:00PM CLA 0.122

Description:

The seminar considers the many faces of power. With an interdisciplinary social science approach, we discuss how power is constructed and exerted in the public and private spheres. We start with politics in the public sphere with classic theories such as those of Karl Marx and Max Weber and continue with more recent formulations such as in anticolonial struggles. We explore forms of domination at the personal level and in social interaction. How the personal is political becomes a focus of the discussion.   We use audiovisuals and short stories to illustrate points made in the social science literature.

 

Texts/Readings/Films:

·       Karl Marx, The Communist Manifesto.

·       Max Weber, “Class, Status and Party” (Abbreviated, on Blackboard).

·       Frantz Fanon, The Wretched of the Earth (Selections).

·       P. Berger and R. Neuhaus, To Empower People: The Role of Mediating Structures in Public Policy (45pp.)

·       Film: Frantz Fanon: Black Skin White Masks.

·       Film:  The Battle of Algiers

 

Assignments:

Participation/posting questions                20%

Class Presentation/Leading discussion      20%

Papers (4 total)                                      60%

 

About the Professor:

Mounira M. Charrad is Associate Professor of Sociology at the University of Texas in Austin.  Her book, States and Women's Rights: The Making of Postcolonial Tunisia, Algeria and Morocco <http://www.ucpress.edu/books/pages/5702.html> (University of California Press), won the Distinguished Book Award from the American Sociological Association and the Best Book on Politics and History Greenstone Award from the American Political Science Association, and the Hamilton Award from the University of Texas.  Her articles have centered on state formation, law, citizenship, kinship and gender. Her current research considers conceptions of modernity in legal discourses in the Middle East.  Her edited volumes include Women's Agency: Silences and Voices, Patrimonial Power in the Modern World and Patrimonialism, Global History and Imperial Rule.

T C 357 • The Veil: Hist, Cul, And Polit

43510 • Fall 2013
Meets TTH 11:00AM-12:30PM CLA 0.118

The course considers the history o the veil, its cultural meanings, and its place in political discourse.  We start by examining the practice of veiling in early Christianity and Islam and the myths that surround its origin.  We then discuss how the veil was intertwined with the "Woman's question" and nationalism in the mid twentieth century in the height of struggles of national liberation in the Middle East.  In the contemporary period, the veil has become an object of fascination in Western societies and a highly charged symbol in the Islamic world.  We explore the multiple meanings of the veil both in political debates and in the individual lives of women. How the veil can range from a form of subordination to a sign of empowerment for women is addressed. Course Objectives:  By the end of the term, students will have the ability to:1)    Describe and characterize a broad array of issues concerning the veil and place veiling in broader social, economic and political contexts.2)    Evaluate the place of broader processes and especially politics in shaping discourses on veiling and gender.3)    Analyze the debates on gender in the Middle East and in other countries. Required Readings (will be discussed in class):        ·        Nikki Keddie, Women in the Middle East:  Past and Present.  Princeton U. Press.        ·        Malek Alloula, The Colonial Harem, U. of Minnesota Press.        ·        Jennifer Heath, ed., The Veil:  Women Writers on its History, Lore, and Politics.  U. of Calif.  Press.Charrad, “Veils and Laws:  Multiple Meanings of the Veil.” On BlackboardCharrad, “Women Ally with the Devil.”  On Blackboard.Charrad, “Gender in the Middle East: Islam, State, Agency.” Annual Review of Sociology, 2011.  Available on line through the UT Library System. News Media Articles:  Short articles from the New York Times and the BBC:  The text or link will be posted on Blackboard.

Requirements: The requirements for the seminar are a research paper and presentations on the readings.  The research paper is developed in stages during the course of the seminar on a topic chosen by the student in consultation with the instructor. Students are encouraged to do research on a topic of interest. They may conduct the research on their own or in teams.  Examples of topics include veiling practices in a given country, laws on veiling (either forcing women to put on a veil as in Iran or to drop it as in Turkey), and interviews of women who wear a veil. 

Mounira (Maya) Charrad received her Ph.D. from Harvard University and her undergraduate degree from the Sorbonne in Paris. Her research has centered on state formation, colonialism, law, citizenship, kinship and women’s rights. More specifically, she has considered strategies of state building in kin-based societies and how struggles over state power shaped the expansion or curtailment of women's rights. She is currently studying conceptions of modernity in legal discourses in the Middle East. Challenging explanations of politics based on a textual approach to religion, she offers instead a focus on social solidarities and where they are grounded (kinship, ethnicity, or other).  Her work has been translated into French and Arabic, and featured on websites and in the media. Her research has been funded by several grants including the National Endowment for the Humanities, the Mellon Foundation, the American Association of University Women, and the American Institute of Maghribi Studies

SOC 320K • Political Sociology

45725 • Spring 2013
Meets MW 3:00PM-4:30PM CLA 0.120
(also listed as MES 341)

Contains a Writing Flag

Course Description:

This course surveys classical theories and major contemporary debates in political sociology.  It is designed to provide students with a general understanding of the different theoretical perspectives on the study of power and politics. The empirical focus of the course includes the US and other countries and the approach is comparative-historical.  We consider issues such as state building, nations, civil society, political parties, elites, social movements, protest, and democracy.  We discuss recent developments both in the US and internationally. Students use major theories and concepts in Political Sociology to make analyze these events.

Course Requirements and Grading Policy

Students are encouraged to take an active role in discussing readings and raising questions.  I expect students to attend class and to complete the assigned readings prior to coming to class.  This is a Writing Flag course that involves writing papers, revising them, and giving comments to your peers on their writing.  Course requirements include one position paper and 2 papers, a team presentation and participation in class discussions. Grading is as follows: Position Paper (500 words): 10%; Paper no. 1 (750 words):  20%; Paper no. 2 (1200 words):  40%; Team presentation: 10%; Class participation: 10 %; Peer review of papers: 10%.  

Papers are evaluated in terms of quality of research, depth of thought, strength of argument, and clarity of expression (i.e., writing style).  Presentations are done in teams.

Text/Readings:

Karl Marx, Communist Manifesto, On line at UT Library

Tocqueville, Democracy in America.  On line at UT Library. Author’s Introduction, chs. 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 8. 

Max Weber, The Protestant Ethic and the Spirit of Capitalism.  One Line at UT library.  Preface, Intro, chs 1, 2, 4 a.  TO CHECK AND CONSIDER SHORTENING READING.

Dan Smith, The State of the World Atlas.  8th ed. Penguin. 2008 (Atlas).

Daniel Chirot, Contentious Identities:  Ethnic, Religious and Nationalist Conflicts in Today’s World. Routledge. 2011.

M. M. Charrad, States and Women’s Rights:  The Making of Postcolonial Tunisia, Algeria and Morocco. Berkeley:  Univ of California Press, 2001 (SWR)

M. M. Charrad, “Central and Local Patrimonialism:  State-building in Kin-based Societies.” In Patrimonial Power in the Modern World.  Annals, Vol 636, July 2011. On Line at UT Library.

Audiovisuals:

Audiovisuals are an integral part of the course. They are used to cover current events.  

 

 

 

SOC 388L • Historical And Comparatv Meths

45920 • Spring 2013
Meets T 6:00PM-9:00PM CLA 1.302A

Description:   

The course is devoted to the study of comparative and historical methods in sociology (CHS). It is designed to provide graduate students with a general understanding of the theoretical paradigms that scholars have developed in that genre of sociology. We pay particular attention to how evidence is used to construct theory. We will be reading closely books that span five decades of comparative and historical sociology and have received attention in the field. All these books are meant as exemplars that “do” comparative and historical sociology.  Each of them puts the methodology in practice to study a substantive sociological issue. Our purpose is to deconstruct each text in order to understand how the author has used comparisons implicitly or explicitly (in most cases) in order to build a theoretical argument.  It is also to play close attention to the sources and type of data used.  In addition, we will consider articles that comment on comparative and historical methods.  These articles should help you develop an intellectual map of the analytic strategies displayed in the books we are using as exemplars of the methodology. Thematically, the seminar focuses on states, state formation, and politics. We will invite guest speakers who use comparative/historical methods to come and tell us about their work from time to time.  An updated syllabus will be provided as necessary.

Grading Policy:

The course meets one a week and attendance is required. The first requirement is to do the readings and to come to class prepared to discuss them.  Students will also be asked to lead designated class discussions.  The second requirement is in the form of written pieces. The course grade depends upon the following:  A critique of readings with oral presentations 25%, a take home midterm 25 %, a research proposal 40%. Class participation  counts for10%. The proposal must draw closely on the seminar readings and at the same time help you formulate your future plans for research, whatever particular method you choose for it.

Texts Required:

B. Moore Jr, Social Origins of Dictatorship and Democracy                                   

T. Skocpol, States and Social Revolutions                                                     

M. M. Charrad, States and Women’s Rights                                                 

Julia Adams, The Familial State        

SOC 336G • Gender Polit In Islamic World

45605 • Fall 2012
Meets TTH 2:00PM-3:30PM NOA 1.102
(also listed as ISL 373, MES 341, R S 358, WGS 340)

Description:

The course is devoted to the study of gender politics in the Islamic world. It is designed to help students gain a better knowledge of the Islamic world and, at the same time, increase their understanding of major sociological concepts such as gender, social organization, culture, and politics. It shows how culture is mediated by politics, resulting in diverse interpretations of the cultural tradition and in different policies with respect to gender. We start by examining the themes and issues that are part of the common denominator of the Islamic tradition. We then consider how the diversity can be explained and what factors contribute to it. The focus is on women’s rights, which have been a key political issue in several countries and internationally.

Texts:

E.W. Fernea, Guests of The Sheik: An Ethnography of an Iraqi Village. Anchor, (GS) 1965.

M. M. Charrad, States and Women’s Rights: The Making of Postcolonial Tunisia, Algeria and

Morocco. Berkeley: Univ of California Press, 2001 (SWR)

Fadela Amara, Breaking the Silence: French Voices from the Ghetto. Berkeley: UC Press 2006 (BTS).

Joni Seager, The Penguin Atlas of Women in the World. 4th ed. Penguin. 2009. (Atlas).

Articles will be placed on Blackboard.

Grading and Requirements:

Students are encouraged to take an active role in discussing readings and raising questions. I expect students to attend class and to complete the assigned readings prior to coming to class.

Exam 1 25%

Exam  2 40%

Exam 3 20%

Team presentation 10%

Class participation 5%

T C 357 • The Veil: Hist, Cul, And Polit

43045 • Fall 2012
Meets TTH 11:00AM-12:30PM BUR 480

THE VEIL: HISTORY, CULTURE AND POLITICS
Plan 2 -- TC 357
 
Professor Mounira Maya Charrad
Plan 2 Junior Seminar
Office:  Burdine 504
Tel. 232 6311; Email: charrad@austin.utexas.edu
Mailbox: Sociology Department Office, BUR 552
 
Description:              The course considers the history o the veil, its cultural meanings, and its place in political discourse.  We start by examining the practice of veiling in early Christianity and Islam and the myths that surround its origin.  We then discuss how the veil was intertwined with the "Woman's question" and nationalism in the mid twentieth century in the height of struggles of national liberation in the Middle East.  In the contemporary period, the veil has become an object of fascination in Western societies and a highly charged symbol in the Islamic world.  We explore the multiple meanings of the veil both in political debates and in the individual lives of women. How the veil can range from a form of subordination to a sign of empowerment for women is addressed.
 
Course Objectives:  By the end of the term, students will have the ability to:
1)    Describe and characterize a broad array of issues concerning the veil and place veiling in broader social, economic and political contexts.
2)    Evaluate the place of broader processes and especially politics in shaping discourses on veiling and gender.
3)    Analyze the debates on gender in the Middle East and in other countries.
 
Required Readings (will be discussed in class):
        ·        Nikki Keddie, Women in the Middle East:  Past and Present.  Princeton U. Press.
        ·        Malek Alloula, The Colonial Harem, U. of Minnesota Press.
        ·        Jennifer Heath, ed., The Veil:  Women Writers on its History, Lore, and Politics.  U. of Calif.  Press.
Charrad, “Veils and Laws:  Multiple Meanings of the Veil.” On Blackboard
Charrad, “Women Ally with the Devil.”  On Blackboard.
Charrad, “Gender in the Middle East: Islam, State, Agency.” Annual Review of Sociology, 2011.  Available on line through the UT Library System.
 
News Media Articles:  Short articles from the New York Times and the BBC:  The text or link will be posted on Blackboard.

SOC 320K • Political Sociology

45500 • Spring 2012
Meets MW 3:00PM-4:30PM BUR 231

Description:

This course surveys classical theories and major contemporary debates in political sociology.  It is designed to provide students with a general understanding of the different theoretical perspectives on the study of power and politics. The empirical focus of the course includes the US and other countries and the approach is comparative- historical.  We will discuss recent developments both in the US and internationally. Students are encouraged to use major theories and concepts in Political Sociology to make sense of these events.

Grading and requirement:

Midterm take home 40%

Research paper 40%

Two position papers discussing the readings 20% for both papers

Class participation is expected. The research paper is developed in stages during the course of the seminar on a topic chosen by the student in consultation with the instructor.

SOC 336G • Gender Polit In Islamic World

45605 • Spring 2012
Meets MWF 11:00AM-12:00PM ENS 109
(also listed as ISL 373, MES 322K, WGS 340)

Course Description:

The course is devoted to the study of gender politics in the Islamic world.  It shows how culture is mediated by politics, resulting in diverse interpretations of the cultural tradition and in different policies with respect to gender. We start by examining the themes and issues that are part of the common denominator of the Islamic tradition.  We then consider how the diversity can be explained and what factors contribute to it.  The focus is on women's rights, which have been a key political issue in several countries and internationally. The course is designed to help students gain a better knowledge of the Islamic tradition and, at the same time, increase their understanding of major sociological concepts such as gender, social organization, culture, and politics.

Course Requirements and Grading Policy:  

Students are encouraged to take an active role in discussing readings and raising questions.  I expect students to attend class and to complete the assigned readings prior to coming to class.  

Exam 1 30%

Exam 2 30%

Country Report 20%

Team presentation 10%

Class participation 10%  

Text/Readings

M. M. Charrad, States and Women's Rights:  The Making of Postcolonial Tunisia, Algeria and Morocco. Berkeley:  Univ of California Press, 2001.

Mernissi, Fatema. Scheherazade Goes West: Different Cultures, Different Harems. New York: Washington Square Press, 2001.

Fadela Amara, Breaking the Silence:  French Voices from the Ghetto. Berkeley:  UC Press 2006

Articles are listed on relevant weeks on the syllabus.  They will be placed on Blackboard.

Audiovisuals:

Audiovisuals are an integral part of the course and will be covered in the exams.  

SOC 388L • Historical And Comparatv Meths

45540 • Fall 2011
Meets T 6:00PM-9:00PM BUR 480

Description:   The course is devoted to the study of comparative and historical methods in sociology (CHS). It is designed to provide graduate students with a general understanding of the theoretical paradigms that scholars have developed in that genre of sociology. We pay particular attention to how evidence is used to construct theory. We will be reading closely books that span five decades of comparative and historical sociology and have received attention in the field. All these books are meant as exemplars that “do” comparative and historical sociology.  Each of them puts the methodology in practice to study a substantive sociological issue. Our purpose is to deconstruct each text in order to understand how the author has used comparisons implicitly or explicitly (in most cases) in order to build a theoretical argument.  It is also to play close attention to the sources and type of data used.  In addition, we will consider articles that comment on comparative and historical methods.  These articles should help you develop an intellectual map of the analytic strategies displayed in the books we are using as exemplars of the methodology.  Thematically, the seminar focuses on states, state formation, and politics. We will invite guest speakers who use comparative/historical methods to come and tell us about their work from time to time.  An updated syllabus will be provided as necessary.

 Grading Policy:

The course meets one a week and attendance is required. The first requirement is to do the readings and to come to class prepared to discuss them.  Students will also be asked to lead designated class discussions.  The second requirement is in the form of written pieces. The course grade depends upon the following:  A critique of readings with oral presentations 25%, a take home midterm 25 %, a research proposal 40%. Class participation  counts for10%. The proposal must draw closely on the seminar readings at the same time as it help you formulate your future plans for research, whatever particular method you choose.

 Texts Required:

B. Moore Jr, Social Origins of Dictatorship and Democracy                                   

T. Skocpol, States and Social Revolutions                                                            

M. M. Charrad, States and Women’s Rights                                                            

Julia Adams, The Familial State                                                                       

Rogers Brubaker, Citizenship and Nationhood in France and Germany

Three highly recommended edited collections: 

There are three edited collections which I see as key in the field.  They offer a combination of pieces practicing CHS and other than comment on various dimensions of the method.  Please consult them in the course of the semester. These edited collections are on reserve at PCL for our course.  They are:

 Skocpol,  Theda, ed.  1984.  Vision and Method in Historical Sociology.  New York: Cambridge University Press.

Mahoney, James, and Dietrich Rueschemeyer. Editors, 2003. Comparative Historical Analysis in the Social Sciences. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press.

Adams,Julia, Elizabeth Clemens and Ann Orloff. Eds. 2005. Remaking Modernity: Politics, History, and Sociology.  Durham, NC. : Duke University Press.

Books for reference:

Brubaker, Rogers. Nationalism Reframed: Nationhood and the National Question in the New Europe.

Wallerstein, Immanuel.  The Modern World System                                                             

Tilly, Charles, Big Structures, Large Processes, Huge Comparisons

Mahoney, James. The Legacies of Liberalism: Path Dependence and Political Regimes in Central America.

Orfoff, Ann.  The Politics of Pensions

Skocpol, Theda.  Protecting Soldiers and Mothers

Hall, John R. with Philip D. Schuyler and Sylvaine Trinh. 2000. Apocalypse Observed: Religious Movements and Violence in North America, Europe, and Japan. London: Routledge.

Lachmann, Richard. 2000. Capitalists in Spite of Themselves: Elite Conflict and European Transitions in Early Modern Europe. New York: Oxford University Press.

websites:

A useful resource is the website of the Comparative and Historical Sociology of ASA. <http://www2.asanet.org/sectionchs/>.   It includes in particular a list of journals that you should find useful for this seminar and for possible places to publish your comparative historical research in the future. 

T C 357 • The Veil: Hist, Cul, And Polit

42935 • Fall 2011
Meets M 3:00PM-6:00PM BUR 480

Description:The course considers the history of the veil, its cultural meanings, and its place in political discourse.  We start by examining the practice of veiling in early Christianity and Islam and the myths that surround its origin.  We then discuss how the veil was intertwined with the "woman's question" and nationalism in the mid twentieth century in the height of struggles of national liberation in the Middle East.  In the contemporary period, The veil has become an object of fascination in Western societies and a highly charged symbol in the Islamic world. We explore the multiple meanings of the veil both in political debates and in the individual lives of women. How the veil can range from a form of subordination to a sign of empowerment for women is a question we address.

Readings:The readings for the seminar are interdisciplinary, drawing on Sociology, Anthropology, and History.  They include two major books and a packet of recent articles.  The books are Women in the Middle East by renowned historian Nikki Keddie and Veiled Sentiments by Lila Abu Lughod, a leading anthropologist of gender.  Placing the lives of women and the veil in historical context, the first book focuses on the diversity and richness of women’s experiences in the Middle East.  The second highlights how gender roles relate to the twin codes of honor and modesty as codes of behavior pervading the Middle East.  It also shows how these codes translate into veiling. Articles in the packet address the place of the veil in today’s ideologies and politics not only in the Islamic world, but also in the United States and Western Europe, where the headscarf has become an object of political confrontation.  From time to time, we use current newspaper articles or media segments in our discussions.Note: Audiovisuals are used frequently during the semester to illustrate variations in the veil from Afghanistan to Morocco and elsewhere.  We see pictures of the veil in different countries and documentaries on debates on veiling.

Requirements:The requirements for the seminar are a research paper and presentations on the readings.  The research paper is developed in stages during the course of the seminar on a topic chosen by the student in consultation with the instructor. Students are encouraged to do research on a topic of interest. They may conduct the research on their own or in teams.  Examples of topics include veiling practices in a given country, laws on veiling (either forcing women to put on a veil as in Iran or to drop it as in Turkey), and interviews of women who wear a veil.   

About the Professor:Dr. Charrad received her PhD from Harvard University and her undergraduate degree from the Sorbonne in Paris, France. She joined UT in 2000-01. Her interests include gender and women's rights, political sociology, development, comparative historical methodology, and the Middle East and North Africa.

SOC 388L • Historical And Comparatv Meths

46535 • Spring 2010
Meets T 6:00PM-9:00PM BUR 480

COMPARATIVE AND HISTORICAL METHODS

 

January 2010

 

Professor Mounira Maya Charrad                                               

Spring 2010, Tu 6-9, Bur 480

SOC 388L.  Unique Number 46535.

Office: Burdine 552, Office Hours: Tues 4.00 -5.30 and by appointment.

Tel. 232 6311, email: charrad@austin.utexas.edu

Mailbox:  Sociology Department Office, Burdine 5th floor.

 

The University of Texas at Austin will provide upon request academic accommodations to qualified students with disabilities.  For more information, call the office of the Dean of students at 471 6259.

 

Course Description:  The course is devoted to the study of comparative and historical methods in sociology (CHS). It is designed to provide graduate students with a general understanding of the theoretical paradigms that scholars have developed in that genre of sociology. We will be reading closely books that span five decades of comparative and historical sociology and have received attention in the field. All these books are meant as exemplars that “do” comparative and historical sociology. Each of them puts the methodology in practice to study a substantive sociological issue. Our purpose is to deconstruct each text in order to understand how the author has used comparisons implicitly or explicitly (in most cases) in order to build a theoretical argument.  It is also to play close attention to the sources and type of data used.  In addition, we will consider articles that comment on comparative and historical methods.  These articles should help you develop an intellectual map of the analytic strategies displayed in the books we are using as exemplars of the methodology.  We will also invite guest speakers who use comparative/historical methods to come and tell us about their work from time to time.  An updated syllabus will be provided as necessary.

 

Course Requirements:  The course meets one a week and attendance is required. The first requirement is to do the readings and to come to class prepared to discuss them.  Students will also be asked to lead designated class discussions.  The second requirement is in the form of two written pieces. The course grade depends upon the following:  Critiques of readings with oral presentations 25%, a take home midterm 25 %, a final paper 40%, and class participation 10%. With instructor’s approval, you may substitute a research proposal for the final paper as long as the proposal draws closely on the seminar readings.

 

Texts Required:

B. Moore Jr, Social Origins of Dictatorship and Democracy.  1966.  Beacon Press.

T. Skocpol, States and Social Revolutions. 1979. Cambridge Univ Press              

M. M. Charrad, States and Women’s Rights. 2001. California Univ Press            

J. Adams, The Familial State2005. Cornell Univ Press.              

R. Brubaker. Citizenship and Nationhood in France and Germany.1998. Harvard U Pr.

 

Recommended: 

There are three edited collections which I see as key in the field.  They offer a combination of pieces practicing CHS and other than comment on various dimensions of the method.  Please consult them in the course of the semester. These edited collections are on reserve at PCL for our course.  The book by Tilly offers methodological suggestions.

 

Skocpol,  Theda, ed.  1984.  Vision and Method in Historical Sociology.  New York:              Cambridge University Press.

Mahoney, James, and Dietrich Rueschemeyer. Editors, 2003. Comparative Historical             Analysis in the Social Sciences. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press.

Adams,Julia, Elizabeth Clemens and Ann Orloff. Eds. 2005. Remaking Modernity:              Politics, History, and Sociology.  Durham, NC. : Duke University Press.

Charles Tilly, Big Structures, Large Processes, Huge Comparisons. 1989.  New York:  Russell Sage.

 

Journals and websites:

Specific journals you may wish to consult are AJS, ASR, Comparative Studies in History and Society, Theory and Society, Sociological Theory.  You may only find a few relevant articles in ASR especially and in AJS, but those that appear there are important for you to read.  The other journals are likely to publish more in CHS.

A very useful resource is the website of the Comparative and Historical Sociology of ASA. <http://www2.asanet.org/sectionchs/>.   It includes in particular a list of journals that you should find useful for this seminar and for possible places to publish your comparative historical research in the future.

You may also want to look at Trajectories, the ASA CHS Section Newsletter with publishes brief articles on the state of the art and topics of the day.

 

Additional Information:

  • You are encouraged to study together and do collaborative projects, but anything you write can only be your own.
  • There will be no incomplete.
  • Assignments are expected by the due date at the beginning of class, and points will be taken out for lateness.
  • Guest lectures are an integral part of the course to be included in your discussions of relevant topics and in exams.
  • More than one unexcused absence will result in a lower grade.

 

 

Jan  19:  Introduction

 

Jan 26:  OVERVIEW OF CHS.

J. Mahoney and G. Goertz, “A Tale of Two Cultures: Contrasting Quantitative and Qualitative Research” in Political Analysis (2006) 14:227–249. (on Blackboard).

 

J. Mahoney and D. Rueschemeyer, “Comparative Historical Analysis:  Achievements and Agendas.” In Mahoney and Rueschemeyer, eds., Comparative Historical Analysis in the Social Sciences, Cambridge University Press. (book is on line, Goggle Scholar).

 

Mounira M. Charrad, “Teaching Comparative and Historical Sociology:  Challenges and new Directions.” Trajectories, Fall 2007. (on line).

 

Mounira M. Charrad, “Waves of Comparative and Historical Sociology.”  Essay on Remaking Modernity by J. Adams, E. Clemens and A. Orloff.  International Journal of Comparative Sociology, 2006, Vol 47 (5):  351-358.  (On line UT Library Website).

 

Feb  2 -16:  CLASSIC FOUNDATION: BASES OF DEMOCRACY AND DICTATORSHIP

Moore, Social Origins

 

Skocpol, Theda, “A Critical Review of Barrington Moore’s Social Origins of Dictatorship and Democracy.”  Politics and Society 4 (Fall 1973):  1-34.

 

Cedric de Leon’s "'No Bourgeois Mass Party, No Democracy': The Missing Link in Barrington Moore's American Civil War." Political Power and Social Theory Volume 19, 2008 (received the Barrington Moore Jr. Prize for best article from the CHS Section of ASA).

 

Feb 16:  Your preliminary outline on ideas for your research proposal is due.

 

Feb 23 –March 2:   METHOD OF AGREEMENT.  REVOLUTIONS:  WHAT DID CHINA, FRANCE AND RUSSIA HAVE IN COMMON.

Skocpol, States and Social Revolutions 

 

March 9:  Guest Lecture:  TBA

 

March 16:  Spring Break

 

March 23:   METHOD OF DIFFERENCE.   STATES AND PATHS TO GENDER POLICY:  HOW DID TUNISIA, ALGERIA AND MOROCCO DIFFER?

Charrad, States and Women’s Rights

 

March 30:  METHOD OF DIFFERENCE (CONTINUED).

Charrad, States and Women’s Rights

 

Dan Slater, “Critical Antecedents and Informative Regress” (with Erica Simmons). Qualitative Methods 6:1 (Spring 2008), pp. 6-13.  (Photocopied).

 

March 30: Take Home Exam Due in Class.

 

April 6-13:  HISTORICAL ANALYSIS OF A KEY CASE:  HOW DID THE FIRST EUROPEAN STATE DEVELOP?

Adams, Familial State

 

April 13: Two page (double space) Proposal Outline Due in Class

                                      

April 20:  STATES, CULTURE AND PATHS TO CITIZENSHIP:  DIFFERENT STORIES IN FRANCE AND GERMANY

Brubaker, Citizenship and Nationhood.

 

Brubaker, William Rogers, 1990, Immigration, Citizenship, and the Nation-State in France and Germany: A comparative historical analysis.”  International Sociology, 5(4):379-407.

 

April 27:  HOW TO DO ARTICLES WITH CHS

 

Prasad, Monica, “Why Is France So French? Culture, Institutions, and Neoliberalism, 1974– 1981.” AJS Volume 111 Number 2 (September 2005): 357–407 (Winner of a CHS Award).

 

Adams, Julia. 1996. Principals and Agents, Colonialists and Company

Men: The Decay of Colonial Control in the Dutch East Indies. American Sociological Review. 61 (1): 12-28.

 

May 4:  PRESENTATION OF PROPOSALS.

 

May 7:  PROPOSALS DUE

 

Books for reference:

 

Brubaker, Rogers. Nationalism Reframed: Nationhood and the National Question         in the New Europe.

Wallerstein, Immanuel.  The Modern World System                                                          

Mahoney, James. The Legacies of Liberalism: Path Dependence and Political Regimes in Central America.

Orfoff, Ann.  The Politics of Pensions

Skocpol, ThedaProtecting Soldiers and Mothers

Hall, John R. with Philip D. Schuyler and Sylvaine Trinh. 2000. Apocalypse Observed: Religious Movements and Violence in North America, Europe, and Japan. London: Routledge.

Lachmann, Richard. 2000. Capitalists in Spite of Themselves: Elite Conflict and European Transitions in Early Modern Europe. New York: Oxford University Press.

 

 

 

T C 357 • The Veil: Hist, Cul, And Polit

43620 • Spring 2010
Meets M 4:00PM-7:00PM WEL 3.260

     THE VEIL: HISTORY, CULTURE AND POLITICS

Professor Mounira Maya Charrad

Spring 2010, Monday 4 to 6.45 PM in WEL 3.260.  Moved to BUR 480.

Plan 2 Junior Seminar.  Unique Number:  43620.

Office: BUR 552. Office hours:  W. 6.45 – 7.30 PM and Tu 4 – 5 PM.

Tel. 232 6311; Email: charrad@austin.utexas.edu

Mailbox: Sociology Department Office, BUR 552.

The University of Texas at Austin will provide upon request academic accommodations to qualified students with disabilities.  For more information, call the office of the Dean of students at 471 6259.

The course considers the history of the veil, its cultural meanings, and its place in political discourse.  We start by examining the practice of veiling in early Christianity and Islam and the myths that surround its origin.  We then discuss how the veil was intertwined with the "Woman's question" and nationalism in the mid twentieth century in the height of struggles of national liberation in the Middle East.  In the contemporary period, the veil has become an object of fascination in Western societies and a highly charged symbol in the Islamic world.  We explore the multiple meanings of the veil both in political debates and in the individual lives of women. How the veil can range from a form of subordination to a sign of empowerment for women is addressed.

Books:

         ·         Nikki Keddie, Women in the Middle East:  Past and Present.  Princeton U. Press. 

         ·         Lila Abu Lughod, Veiled Sentiment:  Honor and Poetry in a Bedouin Society.  UC Press.

         ·         Marnia Lazreg Questioning the Veil: Open Letters to Muslim Women, Princeton U. Press.

Scholarly Articles:  

  • Shavarini, Mitra K  “Wearing the Veil to College: The Paradox of Higher Education in the Lives of Iranian Women.”   International Journal of Middle East Studies, vol. 38, no. 2, pp.189-211, May 2006.
  • Secor, Anna J. “The Veil and Urban Space in Istanbul: Women's Dress, Mobility and Islamic Knowledge.”  Gender, Place and Culture, vol. 9, no. 1, pp. 5-22, Mar 2002.
  • Atasoy, Yildiz.  “Governing Women's Morality: A Study of Islamic Veiling in Canada.” in  European Journal of Cultural Studies, vol. 9, no. 2, pp. 203-221, May 2006
  • Carle, Robert.  “Hijab and the Limits of French Secular Republicanism.” Society, vol. 41, no. 6, pp. 63-68, Sept-Oct 2004
  • Killian, Caitlin.  “The Other Side of the Veil: North African Women in France Respond to the Headscarf Affair.”  Gender & Society, vol. 17, no. 4, pp. 567-590, Aug 2003.
  • Charrad, “Veils and Laws:  Multiple Meanings of the Veil” (photocopied)
  • Charrad, “Women Ally with the Devil” (photocopied)

 News Media Articles:

  • Short articles from the New York Times and the BBC:  The text or link will be posted on Blackboard. 

 

  • The readings for the seminar are interdisciplinary, drawing on Sociology, Anthropology, and History.  They include two major books and a packet of recent articles.  The books are Women in the Middle East by renowned historian Nikki Keddie; Veiled Sentiments by Lila Abu Lughod, a leading anthropologist of gender; and Questioning the Veil by Marnia Lazreg, a prominent sociologist.  Placing the lives of women and the veil in historical context, the first book focuses on the diversity and richness of women’s experiences in the Middle East.  The second highlights how gender roles relate to the twin codes of honor and modesty as codes of behavior pervading the Middle East. It also shows how these codes translate into veiling The third addresses current debates surrounding the veil. Articles in the packet address the place of the veil in today’s ideologies and politics not only in the Islamic world, but also in the United States and Western Europe, where the headscarf has become an object of political confrontation.  From time to time, we use current newspaper articles or media segments in our discussions.

Audiovisuals:

Audiovisuals are used frequently during the semester to illustrate variations in the veil from Afghanistan to Morocco and elsewhere.  We see pictures of the veil in different countries, and videos on the hijab and debates on veiling.

Requirements:

The requirements for the seminar are a research paper and presentations on the readings.  The research paper is developed in stages during the course of the seminar on a topic chosen by the student in consultation with the instructor.  Students are encouraged to do research on a topic of interest. They may conduct the research on their own or in teams.  Examples of topics include veiling practices in a given country, laws on veiling (either forcing women to put on a veil as in Iran or to drop it as in Turkey), and interviews of women who wear a veil.

Framework for Research Papers:

There are three major forms of discourse for you to consider when you think about your research paper:  The discourse of individual women and men; the discourse of policy, law makers and other political groups; and the discourse of social scientists on the functions and meanings of the veil such as that of anthropologists, sociologists, historians, or political scientists.  In designing your research project, start by identifying the actors whose discourse you will study.  You may choose one or several sets of actors.

Note

Prominent scholars in the field and members of the Austin community engaged in relevant work will be invited as our guest lecturers.  The dates for their visit to the seminar will be announced in the course of the semester depending on their availability.  Updated versions of the syllabus will be provided on Blackboard in the course of the semester as needed.  Make sure to check.

Additional Information:

You are encouraged to study together and do collaborative projects, but anything you write can only be your own.

There will be no incomplete.

Keep on your computer and a back up device until the end of the semester a file of every piece of writing you hand in.

Excuses for absences will be considered only in rare, genuine circumstances and with proper medical documentation.

Attendance is mandatory; more than two unexcused absences will be reflected in the final grade.

There are no extra credit provisions for this course.

Wk 1 (Jan 25)

Class Discussion:

Images of Women in the Islamic World.  Why the fascination and the debates about the veil.

Wk 2 (Feb 1).  Women’s Dress and Morality

            Secor, Anna J. “The Veil and Urban Space in Istanbul: Women's Dress, Mobility and

Islamic Knowledge.”  Gender, Place and Culture, vol. 9, no. 1, pp. 5-22, Mar 2002.

Atasoy, Yildiz.  “Governing Women's Morality: A Study of Islamic Veiling in Canada.” in  European Journal of Cultural Studies, vol. 9, no. 2, pp. 203-221, May 2006

Wk 3 (Feb 8).  The Headscarf Controversy

Carle, Robert.  “Hijab and the Limits of French Secular Republicanism.” Society, vol. 41, no. 6, pp. 63-68, Sept-Oct 2004

Killian, Caitlin.  “The Other Side of the Veil: North African Women in France Respond to the Headscarf Affair.”  Gender & Society, vol. 17, no. 4, pp. 567-590, Aug 2003.

Wk 4 (Feb 15). Historical Overview from the Beginning of Islam to End of 18th Century

Keddie, Preface, Introduction, chs. 1, 2, 3.

Wk 5 (Feb 22).  The Veil in Nationalism, Women’s Movements and Islamism:  19th and 20th centuries.

            Keddie, Chs. 4,5,6, Conclusion.

Wk 6 (March 1).  ). Boundaries and Gender and Discussion of Sources on the Veil.

Shavarini, Mitra K  “Wearing the Veil to College: The Paradox of Higher Education in the Lives of Iranian Women.”   International Journal of Middle East Studies, vol. 38, no. 2, pp.189-211, May 2006.

Charrad, “Veils and Laws:  Multiple Meanings of the Veil” (photocopied)

Charrad, “Women Ally with the Devil” (photocopied)

Keddie, Book 2, Part I.

Locate at least 5 sources in print (books or articles in scholarly journals) and 5 on the web or in popular literature. 

Wk 7. March 8:  Guest lecture.  TBA.

March 15:  Spring break.

Wk 8 (March 22).  Identity in a Changing World

            Abu Lughod, Preface, Chs 1 and 2.

Outline of research project due (3 pages).  Indicate the topic, the main point you think you want to argue, the sections of your paper, the content of each section, your methodology, and at least 5 sources.

Wk 9 (March 29).  Honor and Sexuality

            Abu-Lughd, chs. 3 and 4

Guest lecture on sources and data bases by the PCL Middle East Research Librarian.  Bring your questions about your topic.

Wk 10 (April 5). Modesty and Marriage

Abu Lughod, chs 7, 8 and Appendix

First draft of paper due.  Discussion of research projects in class on March 25th.

Wk 11 (April 12). ): Cultural Identity

Lazreg, Introduction, Letters 1, 2, 3.

Wk 12 (Apr 19).  Current Debates and SimulationGame on Genderstan.

Articles on laws on veiling in countries of Europe and the Middle East from the New York Times and the BBC (posted on Blackboard).

Newly created nation-state of Genderstan is designing its policy on veils and women’s rights.  Debate on laws on veiling and women’s rights.

Prepare your arguments.  Anchor your position in the literature.  Select at least 2 of the sources we have read to support your position.

Lazreg, Letters 4, 5.

Wk 13 (April 26):  Presentations on Research Projects

Wk 14 (May 3).  Presentations on Research Projects

May 3:  Research Paper due.

SOC 336G • Gender Polit In Islamic World

45705 • Spring 2009
Meets MW 3:00PM-4:30PM PHR 2.114
(also listed as MES 322K, R S 358, WGS 340)

                       GENDER POLITICS IN THE ISLAMIC WORLD

SPRING 2009

Course Description:   The course is designed to help students gain a better knowledge of the Islamic world and, at the same time, increase their understanding of major sociological concepts such as gender, social organization, culture, and politics.  The course is devoted to the study of gender politics in the Islamic world.  It shows how culture is mediated by politics, resulting in diverse interpretations of the cultural tradition and in different policies with respect to gender. We start by examining the themes and issues that are part of the common denominator of the Islamic tradition.  We then consider how the diversity can be explained and what factors contribute to it.  The focus is on women’s rights, which have been a key political issue in several countries and internationally.

 Course Requirements and Grading Policy:  Students are encouraged to take an active role in discussing readings and raising questions.  I expect students to attend class and to complete the assigned readings prior to coming to class.  Course Requirements include 2 exams, a country report, a team presentation and participation in class discussions. Grading is as follows: Exam no.1:  40%; Exam no.2: 25%; Country Report 15%; Team presentation: 10%; Class participation: 10%. 

Text/Readings:

M. M. Charrad, States and Women’s Rights:  The Making of Postcolonial Tunisia, Algeria and Morocco. Berkeley:  Univ of California Press, 2001 (SWR)

Mernissi, Fatema. Scheherazade Goes West: Different Cultures, Different Harems. New York: Washington Square Press, 2001.

Fadela Amara, Breaking the Silence:  French Voices from the Ghetto. Berkeley:  UC Press 2006

Articles will be placed on Blackboard.

Audiovisuals:

Audiovisuals are an integral part of the course and will be covered in the exams. 

SOC 395G • Gender And Development

46770 • Fall 2008
Meets T 6:00PM-9:00PM BUR 231
(also listed as WGS 393)

C

WGS 345 • Global Gender Inequality

48780 • Fall 2008
Meets MW 3:00PM-4:30PM BUR 208

Topics in Women's and Gender Studies.

WGS 340 • Gender Polit In Islamic World

48805 • Spring 2008
Meets MW 3:00PM-4:30PM PHR 2.114

Multidisciplinary course examining experiences and issues of gender in different cultures.

WGS 345 • Global Gender Inequality

48395 • Spring 2007
Meets MW 3:00PM-4:30PM PHR 2.114

Topics in Women's and Gender Studies.

SOC 395G • Gender And Development

47705 • Fall 2006
Meets T 7:00PM-10:00PM BUR 214
(also listed as WGS 393)

C

WGS 340 • Gender Polit In Islamic World

49620 • Fall 2006
Meets MW 12:00PM-1:30PM BUR 214

Multidisciplinary course examining experiences and issues of gender in different cultures.

WGS 340 • Gender Polit In Islamic World

47660 • Fall 2005
Meets MW 4:00PM-5:30PM RLM 6.122

Multidisciplinary course examining experiences and issues of gender in different cultures.

WGS 345 • Gend Inequality: Comp Persp-W

47700 • Fall 2005
Meets MW 7:00PM-8:30PM BUR 214

Topics in Women's and Gender Studies.

WGS 340 • Gender Polit In Islam World-W

46115 • Spring 2005
Meets TTH 5:00PM-6:30PM BUR 231

Multidisciplinary course examining experiences and issues of gender in different cultures.

SOC 395G • Gender And Development

45213 • Fall 2004
Meets M 1:00PM-4:00PM BUR 232
(also listed as WGS 393)

C

SOC 395G • Gender And Development

42470 • Spring 2004
Meets W 4:00PM-7:00PM BUR 214
(also listed as WGS 393)

C

SOC 395G • Gender And Development

42825 • Spring 2003
Meets T 4:00PM-7:00PM BUR 231
(also listed as WGS 393)

C

WGS 340 • Gender Polit In Islamic World

45575 • Fall 2002
Meets TTH 11:00AM-12:30PM RAS 313B

Multidisciplinary course examining experiences and issues of gender in different cultures.

Publications


BOOKS AND VOLUMES

Women Rising:  Resistance, Revolution and Reform in the Arab Spring and Beyond, Rita Stephan & Mounira M. Charrad, eds., New York University Press, forthcoming.

Patrimonial Capitalism and Empire, Mounira M. Charrad & Julia Adams, eds.  UK: Emerald Publishing (Book Series, Political Power and Social Theory), 2015.

Patrimonial Power in the Modern World,Julia Adams & Mounira M. Charrad, eds., The Annals of the American Academy of Political and Social Sciences (New York, NY: Sage), Vol. 636 (1), July 2011. 230 pp.

Women’s Agency: Silences and Voices, Guest Editor for Special issue, Women’s Studies International Forum, Vol. 33 (6), December 2010.

States and Women's Rights:  The Making of Postcolonial Tunisia, Algeria and Morocco.  Berkeley, CA:  University of California Press, 2001.  xi + 341 pp. (Hardcover and paperback).

 - Arabic Translation published by the Centre de Traduction Nationale, Tunis, Tunisia. 2012.

- Translations into French and Chinese: forthcoming.

Panels and Symposia on States and Women’s Rights

- Review Symposium, Political Sociology: States, Power & Societies (Political Sociology Section, American Sociological Association). Winter 2005, Vol. 12, No. 1: 1-9.

- Author-Meets-Critics Panel, Society for the Study of Social Problems Annual Meeting, San Francisco, August 13, 2004.

- Author-Meets-Critics Panel, Southern Sociological Society Annual Meeting, New Orleans, March 2003.

- Author-Meets-Critics Panel, Eastern Sociological Society Annual Meeting, Philadelphia, February 2003.

Femmes, Culture et Société au Maghreb, 2 vols.  Volume I:  Culture, Femmes et Famille.   Volume II: Femmes, Pouvoir Politique et Developpement.  Co-editor with R. Bourqia and N. Gallagher.  Casablanca, Morocco:  Afrique Orient, 1996.  183 pp and 205 pp. (Paperback).

ARTICLES AND CHAPTERS  (*) indicates peer reviewed journals.

(*) “’You Killed our Brothers:’ The ‘Reclamation’ Master Frame in the 2011 Arab Uprisings.” Mounira M.Charrad, Amina Zarrugh & Hyun Jeong Ha. Under Review.

(*) “’Present in the Society’: Professional Women Leaders and Family Law Reform in Morocco.” Mounira M. Charrad & Rita Stephan.  Under review.

Living History Interview:  Mounira Maya Charrad,” 24(2) Transnational Law & Contemporary Problems 24 (2); & Journal of Gender, Race & Justice 18(2), 2016: 457-76.

“Progressive Family Law: How It Came About in Tunisia,” Transnational Law & Contemporary Problems 24(2); & Journal of Gender, Race & Justice 18(2), 2016: 351-360.

- Reprinted in Gender in Constitutional Law, 3 vols., edited by Catharine A. MacKinnon, Elizabeth A. Long and James Barr Ames, forthcoming.

“Women are Complete, not Complements”: Debates in the Writing of a New Constitution in Tunisia.” Mounira M. Charrad and Amina Zarrugh in Women Rising:  Resistance, Revolution and Reform in the Arab Spring and Beyond, R. Stephan & M. M. Charrad, eds., New York University Press, forthcoming.

“Sustained Reforms of Islamic Family Law: Tunisia under Authoritarian Regimes, 1950s to 2010,” Mounira M. Charrad & Hyun Jeong Ha in Family Law and Gender in the Modern Middle East,A. Wing & H. Kassim (eds.), NY: Cambridge University Press, forthcoming.

“Family Law and Islam,” in Family Futures, Sean Nicklin, ed., Publication for the 20th Anniversary of the International Year of the Family.  Leicester, UK:  Tudor Rose in collaboration with the United Nations Department of Economic & Social Affairs, Division for Social Policy & Development, forthcoming.

“Constructing Citizenship: Gender and Changing Discourses in Tunisia.”  Mounira M. Charrad and Amina Zarrugh. Gendered Citizenship: The Challenges of Representation. Edited by H. Danielson, K. Jegerstedt, R. L. Muriaas & B. Ytre-Arne. Palgrave, 2016.

(*) “Limits of Empire: The French Colonial State  Local Patrimonialism.”  Mounira M. Charrad & Daniel Jaster, in M. M. Charrad & J. Adams, eds., Patrimonial Capitalism and Empire, UK: Emerald Publishing (Book Series, Political Power & Social Theory, Vol. 28) 2015.

(*) “Introduction:  Old (Patrimonial) Political Forms Made New." Julia Adams and Mounira M. Charrad, in Patrimonial Capitalism and Empire. UK: Emerald Publishing. Book Series Political Power and Social Theory, Mounira M. Charrad & Julia Adams, eds., Vol. 28, 2015.

“From Colonialism to the Arab Spring:  Gender, Religion and State,” Mounira M. Charrad and Amina Zarrugh in Emerging Trends in the Social and Behavioral Sciences, Robert A. Scott & Stephen M. Kosslyn, eds, Hoboken, NJ: John Wiley and Sons, 2015.

(*) “Equal or Complementary? Women in the New Tunisian Constitution after the Arab Spring,” Mounira M. Charrad & Amina Zarrugh, Journal of North African Studies19 (2), 2014.

- Reprinted in Andrea Khalil, ed., Gender, Women and the Arab Spring, Routledge, 2015.

“The Arab Spring and Women’s Rights in Tunisia.” Mounira M. Charrad & Amina Zarrugh. E-International Relations, September 4, 2013.

(*) “Central and Local Patrimonialism:  State Building in Kin-Based Societies.” in Patrimonial Power in the Modern World, Julia P. Adams & Mounira M. Charrad, eds, The Annals, The American Academy of Political and Social Sciences. New York, NY: Sage, Vol. 636 (1) July 2011, pp. 49 - 68.

(*) “Patrimonialism, Past and Present:  An Introduction.” Mounira M. Charrad and Julia P. Adams in Patrimonial Power in the Modern World, Julia P. Adams & Mounira M. Charrad, eds, Vol. 636 of The Annals, The American Academy of Political and Social Sciences. New York, NY: Sage, Volume 636, Issue 1, July 2011, pp. 6-15.

(*) “Gender in the Middle East: Islam, States, Agency.” Annual Review of Sociology. Vol 37, 2011, pp. 417-37.

(*) “Women’s Agency across Cultures:  Conceptualizing Strengths and Boundaries,” in Women’s Agency:  Silences and Voices, Special issue, Women’s Studies International Forum, Vol. 33 (6), December 2010, pp. 517-22

(*) “Kinship, Islam or Oil:  Culprits of Gender Inequality?” Politics and Gender (A Journal of the American Political Science Association). Vol. 5 (4), December 2009:  546-553.

(*) “Tunisia at the Forefront of the Arab World:  Two Waves of Gender Legislation.Washington and Lee Law Review. Vol. 64 (4), Fall 2007:  1513-27.

- Revised and Reprinted in Women in the Middle East and North Africa: Agents of Change, edited by Fatima Sadiqi and Moha Ennaji.  New York: Routledge, 2010.

(*) “Contexts, Concepts and Contentions:  Gender Legislation in the Middle East.”  Hawwa: Journal of Women in the Middle East and the Islamic World.  2007. Vol. 5 (1): 55-72

- Reprinted in Women of the Middle East, ed. Fatma M. Gocek, New York:  Routledge, Routledge Major Works Series, 2015

“Unequal Citizenship:  Issues of Gender Justice in the Middle East and North Africa.” In Maitrayee Mukhopadhyay, ed., Gender Justice, Citizenship and Development, Ottawa, Canada:  International Development Research Centre, 2007.

"Becoming a Citizen: Lineage Versus Individual in Morocco and Tunisia." In Gender and Citizenship in the Middle East, Suad Joseph, ed.  Syracuse, NY:  Syracuse University Press, 2000, pp. 70-87.

- Translated into Arabic and published in Beirut by AnNahar Press, 2003.

"Cultural Diversity Within Islam:  Veils and Laws in Tunisia."  In Women in Muslim Societies:  Diversity Within Unity, H.L. Bodman and N. Tohidi, eds.  Boulder, CO:  Lynne Rienner, 1998, pp. 63-79.

(*) “Policy Shifts:  State, Islam and Gender in Tunisia, 1930s -- 1990s.” In Social Politics, Summer 1997, Vol. 4 (2):  284-319.

- Revised and reprinted as “Family Law and Ideological Debates in Postcolonial Tunisia.” in Yount, K.M.and H. Rashad (eds.). Family in the Middle East: Ideational Change in Egypt, Iran, and Tunisia: Routledge, 2008.

- Expanded as “Continuity or Change:  Family Law and Family Structure in Tunisia.” With Allyson Goeken. In African Families at the Turn of the Twenty-First Century, ed. By Yaw Oheneba-Sakyi and Baffour K. Takyi, Westport, CT:  Praeger, 2006.

- "Femmes au Maghreb:  Perspectives et Questions." co-authored with R. Bourqia and N. Gallagher.  In Femmes, Culture et Société au Maghreb.  Casablanca, Morocco:  Afrique Orient, 1996, pp. 9-14.

"Repudiation versus Divorce:  Responses to State Policy in Tunisia." in Women, the Family and Policy:  A Global Perspective, E. N. Chow and C. W. Berheide, eds.  State University of New York Press, 1994, pp. 51-69.

(*) “State and Gender in the Maghrib.” In Middle East Report, March-April, 1990, pp. 19-24.

- Updated in Women and Power in the Middle East, Suad Joseph and Susan Slyomovics, eds., Philadelphia:  University of Pennsylvania Press, 2001, pp. 61-71.

- Translated and revised as "Formation de L'Etat et Statut Personnel: Esquisse d'une Analyse Comparative et Théorique." in R. Bourqia, M. Charrad and N. Gallagher, eds., Femmes, Culture et Société au Maghreb, vol. 2. Casablanca, Morocco: Afrique Orient, 1996, pp. 15-31.

- Reprinted in Arab Women:  Between Defiance and Restraint, ed. By Suha Sabbagh, New York:  Interlink Publishers, 1996, 221-31.

"Employment Effects on Fertility Control in Tunisia." with R. Suzman and K. Miller. In Recent Empirical Findings on Fertility: Korea, Nigeria, Tunisia, Venezuela, Philippines.  Occasional Mono­graph Series, No. 7, Smithsonian Institution, Washington, D.C., December 1976.

"Les Cadres Politiques au Niveau Local en Tunisie." In Social Stratific­ation and Develop­ment in the Mediterranean Basin, Mubeccel B. Kiray (ed.).  The Hague:  Mouton, 1973.

ESSAYS AND COMMENTARIES

Feminist Associations under Authoritarianism in Tunisia.” Mounira M. Charrad & Maro Youssef. Bakcer Institute for Public Policy Blog, Rice University.  Baker Institute for Public Policy Blog, Rice University. Published by The Houston Chronicle.  May 15, 2017.

“Comment on Making Morocco:  Colonial Intervention and the Politics of Identity by Jonathan Wyrtzen.”  Trajectories, Comparative and Historical Sociology Section, American Sociological Association, 2016. Vol 28, No.1: 14-15.

“Five Years Later: Gender Equity in the Law after the Arab Spring in Tunisia.” Mounira M. Charrad & Amina Zarrugh. Baker Institute for Public Policy Blog, Rice University. Published by The Houston Chronicle. March 21, 2016.

Contradictions of the Tunisian State: Women’s Rights and Gendered Repression.” Mounira M. Charrad and Amina Zarrugh. Baker Institute for Public Policy Blog, Rice University. Published by The Houston Chronicle. July 30, 2015.

Guest Editor, Book Symposium on Interpretation and Social Knowledge:  On the Use of Theory in the Human Sciences, by Isaac Ariail Reed, Trajectories, Comparative and Historical Sociology Section, American Sociological Association, Summer 2013, Vol. 24 (2): 1-17.

“State and Law: A Perspective from Political Sociology,” Symposium on Politics and Law, AMICI, Sociology of Law Section, American Sociological Association, January 2013. Vol. 21 (1): 9-12.

“Revolutions, Old and New,” with Danielle Kane, Trajectories, Comparative and Historical Sociology Section, American Sociological Association, Vol. 24, no. 1, Fall 2012.

“Family law reforms in the Arab world: Tunisia and Morocco.” Report for the United Nations Department of Economic and Social Affairs (UNDESA) Division for Social Policy and Development Expert Group Meeting, New York, May 2012.

 “Arab Women’s Rights:  Lessons from Tunisia and Morocco.” in Arab Women Leadership Outlook, 2009-2011. 2009. Dubai:  Dubai Women’s Establishment:  59-60.

Patrimonial States in Early Modern Europe and in the Contemporary Era: Similarities?” Essay on The Familial State by J. Adams, Political Power & Social Theory, 2008, Vol. 19: 243–251.

A Brief History of Family Law in Morocco.”  Essay for an exhibition on Women, Power and Politics, International Museum of Women.  2008.

- Translated in French, Spanish and Arabic.

The Sociology of Islam: ASA Session Brings Fresh Perspective.” with Christopher Pieper, Sociology of Religion, Newsletter of the Sociology of Religion Section of the American Sociological Association, Volume IX, Number 2, Winter 2008, pp. 5 and 8.

Teaching Comparative and Historical Sociology: Challenges and New Directions.Trajectories, Newsletter of the Comparative and Historical Sociology Section of the American Sociological Association, Vol. 19 (1), Fall 2007.

Waves of Comparative & Historical Sociology.” Essay on Remaking Modernity by J. Adams, E. Clemens & A. Orloff. International Journal of Comparative Sociology, 2006, 47 (5): 351-8.

“Broadening the Discourse:  States in Kin-based Societies” in Political Sociology:  States, Power, & Societies (Political Sociology Section, American Sociological Association). Winter 2005, 12 (1): 1: 8-9.

Code of Personal Status, Tunisia.Encyclopedia of the Modern Middle East & North Africa, 4 vols. 2d ed., Philip Mattar ed., Detroit, MI: Macmillan Reference USA, 2004: 2230-31.

Why study Colonialism?Comparative & Historical Sociology, (Comparative & Historical Sociology Section, American Sociological Association), Spring 2003, Vol 15 (1): 18-21.

Bringing in Tribe: Beyond a State/Class Paradigm.Comparative & Historical Sociology, (Comparative & Historical Sociology Section, American Sociological Association), Summer 1999, 11 (3): 1-3.

BOOK REVIEWS

Rulers and Families.” Review essay on The Familial State:  Ruling Families and Merchant Capitalism in Early Modern Europe by Julia Adams, contribution to a review symposium, Comparative and Historical Sociology Section Newsletter, ASA, Vol. 17 (2), Spring 2006.

"Review" of Gender and National Identity:  Women and Politics in Muslim Societies, ed. by Valentine M. Moghadam.  In Contemporary Sociology, Vol. 24 (6),  November 1995.

"Review" of Women and the Family in the Middle East:  New Voices of Change, ed. by Elizabeth W. Fernea.  In Contemporary Sociology, Vol. 16 (2), 2, March 1987.

"Review" of Muslim Law Courts and the French Colonial State in Algeria by Allan Christelow. In the Middle East Journal, Vol.41 (2), Spring 1987.

"Review" of Woman in the Muslim Unconscious by Fatna A. Sabbah. In Middle East Studies Associa­tion Bulletin, Vol. 20 (2), December 1986.

"Review" of Women in Muslim Family Law by J. L. Esposito.  In Sociological Analysis, Vol. 43 (4), Winter 1982.

WORK IN PROGRESS

Gender Regimes: Feminism from Autocracy to Democracy in Tunisia. Book in preparation

Awards and Achievements


Book Awards

  • Distinguished Scholarly Book Award, American Sociological Association.
  • Best Book on Politics and History Greenstone Award, American Political Science Association.
  • Distinguished Contribution to Scholarship Award. Outstanding Book in Political Sociology, American Sociological Association, Section on Political Sociology.
  • Outstanding Scholarly Book in Any Field Hamilton Award, University of Texas at Austin.
  • Best First Book in the Field of History Award, Phi Alpha Theta International Honor Society in History.
  • Best Book in Sociology Komarosvky Award, Honorable Mention, Eastern Sociological Society.

These awards were won for her book, States and Women's Rights: The Making of Postcolonial Tunisia, Algeria and Morocco (University of California Press, 2001).

Selected professional, scholarly awards and achievements include:

Council Member (elected), Section on Comparative and Historical Sociology, American Sociological Association, 2011-14.

Editorial Board, Contemporary Sociology, 2011-present.

National Endowment for the Humanities, Faculty Fellowship for Research, Sept 2010-June 2011.

American Institute of Maghrebi Studies, Grant for Field Research in Tunisia, 2009- 2010.

Advisor, Survey of Women’s Rights in the Middle East and North Africa, Freedom House, New York, 2009 and 2004.

Distinguished Service to the Tunisian American Community Ibn Khaldun Award, 2005.  In recognition of “bringing a better understanding of Tunisian society, history, and culture to American universities, students, and educated public.”

Associate Editor, Editorial Board, Sociological Theory, 2006-Present.

Editorial Board, Politics and Gender, 2007-present

International Selection Committee, Middle East Research Competition, Ford Foundation, 2006-08.

Editorial Advisory Board, Journal of Middle East Women’s Studies, 2004-present.

American Sociological Association-National Science Foundation Fund for the Advancement of the Discipline Grant, 2004.

Council Member (elected), Section on Comparative and Historical Sociology, American Sociological Association, December 1999-2003.

Board of Directors, American Institute of Maghribi Studies, 1999- 2003.                                        

Chair (elected), Faculty Advisory Committee (Editorial Board), University of Texas Press, 2006-07.

Honorary Member, Phi Alpha Theta International Honor Society in History, 2002 – present.

International Advisory Board Member, Journal of North African Studies, 1997-present.

 

Professional Activities


EDITORIAL BOARDS

Member, Journal of Middle East Women’s Studies, 2014—present.

Member, International Journal of Gender and Women’s Studies, 2016-present.

International Advisory Board Member, Journal of North African Studies, 1997-present.

Member, Contemporary Sociology, 2012-15.

Advisory Board Member, Journal of Middle East Women’s Studies, 2004-2014.

Member, Politics and Gender, American Political Science Association, 2007- 2013.

Associate Editor, Sociological Theory, 2006-2010.

REFEREE FOR

American Sociological Review; American Journal of Sociology; Theory and Society; Sociological Theory; Social Problems; Qualitative Sociology; Party Politics; Politics and Gender; Middle East Journal; International Journal of Middle East Studies; International Journal of Feminist Politics; Islamic Law and Society; Journal of Middle East Women’s Studies; Journal of North African Studies; St Antony's International Review (University of Oxford); the National Science Foundation, Sociology Program; Cambridge University Press; University of California Press; Stanford University Press; Routledge Publishers; and Oxford University Press.

SELECTED ACTIVITIES

Membership Committee, Human Rights Section, American Sociological Association, 2016-

Jessie Bernard Award Selection Committee, American Sociological Association, 2015-18.

Chair, Committee on Award for Best Book, Global and Transnational Sociology Section, American Sociological Association, 2016.

Tenure Review External Reviewer, Department of Sociology, Yale University, 2015.

Committee on Award for Best article in Global and Transnational Sociology, American Sociological Association, 2015.

Council (elected), Global and Transnational Sociology Section, American Sociological Association, 2014-2017.

Council (elected), Comparative and Historical Sociology Section, American Sociological Association, 2011-2014.

Nominee, Board of Directors, Middle East Studies Association, November 2009.

Nominee, Committee on Nominations, American Sociological Association, May 2009.

Life Time Achievement Award Committee, Association of Middle East Women’s Studies, 2007.

Lewis A. Coser Award for Theoretical Agenda Setting, Selection Committee, Theory Section, American Sociological Association, 2006-07.

Nominee, Committee on Nominations, American Sociological Association, October 2006.

Distinguished Book Award Committee, American Sociological Association, 2005-2007.

International Selection Committee, Middle East Research Competition, Ford Foundation, 2006-08.

International Advisory Panel, Center of Arab Women for Training & Research, Tunis, Tunisia, 2006. Project on The Dynamics of Discriminatory Social Beliefs & Practices & Gender Equity in the Arabic-Speaking MENA Region: Lessons Learned in the Last 20 Years.

Elected to the Nominating Committee, Middle East Studies Association, 2006.

Distinguished Scholarly Publication Award Committee Political Sociology Section, American Sociological Association, Summer 2003.

Nominee, Board of Directors, Middle East Studies Association, Fall 2002.

Elected to the Executive Board, Association of Middle East Women’s Studies, June 2002-2009.                                                                 

Program Committee, Association of Middle East Women’s Studies, 2001–2008.

Elected to Council, Section on Comparative and Historical Sociology, American Sociological Association, December 1999-2003.

Elected to the Board of Directors, American Institute of Maghribi Studies, 1999- 2003.                                        

Nominee, Presidency of the Association of Middle East Women's Studies, March 1999 (declined).

Member of the Program Committee, Middle East Studies Association, 1988.

Coordinator, French Sociology Group, University of California, San Diego, January 1984-June 1985. Organized discussions of French writings in Social Theory.

SERVICE TO THE UNIVERSITY OF TEXAS

Faculty Advisor, Politics, History & Society, Faculty & Graduate Student Network, 2007- present.

Faculty Advisor, Middle East Working Group, 2012-present.

Member (invited) Committee on Global Research Fellowships, International Office, 2016-

Graduate Steering Committee (appointed), Department of Sociology, 2016-

Recruitment Committee (appointed), Department of Sociology, 2016.

Member (elected), Executive Committee, Department of Sociology, 2014-2016.

Promotion Committee, Department of Sociology, 2015.

Chair, Political Sociology Specialization, 2005-07; and 2010-2014.

Chair (elected), Faculty Advisory Committee (Editorial Board), University of Texas Press, 2006-07.

Advisory Committee (Editorial Board), University of Texas Press, 2003-2008.

Nominated to run for the Faculty Council, March 2007.

Advisory Committee (Editorial Board), University of Texas Press, 2003-2008.

Consultant on International Research for the Internal Review Board, Office of Research Support and Compliance, 2003-2004.

Member, Social Theory Position Search Committee, 2003-2004.

Minority Liaison Officer, 2003-2005.

Hamilton Award Committee for Best Book by the Faculty of the University of Texas, 2002-2003.

Advisory Committee, France UT Institute for Interdisciplinary Studies, 2002-present. 

President’s Committee on International Education Fee Scholarship Selection, 2001-2002.

Department of Education Foreign Language and Area Studies Fellowship Committee, Center for Middle East Studies, 2001-2002.

Executive Committee, 2001-2003.

Internal Review Committee, 2001-2002.


  • Department of Sociology

    The University of Texas at Austin
    305 E 23rd St, A1700
    CLA 3.306
    Austin, TX 78712-1086
    512-232-6300