Department of Sociology

Jamie O'Quinn


M.A., San Francisco State University

Jamie O'Quinn

Contact

Interests


Sexualities; Gender; Critical race, feminist, and queer theories; Qualitative methodologies; Public sociology

Biography


Jamie O’Quinn is a PhD candidate in the Department of Sociology at the University of Texas at Austin. Her research and teaching interests include sexualities, gender, race, youth and adolescence, the family, queer theory, and qualitative methods.

She received her master’s in Sexuality Studies from San Francisco State University in 2016. For her MA thesis, Jamie conducted a queer analysis of an LGBTQ-inclusive sexuality education curriculum, understanding how progressive visions of sexuality education envision young people’s sexual futures. This paper, co-authored with Jessica Fields, is now published at Sexuality Research and Social Policy.

Her dissertation research investigates child marriage in the United States, exploring how state efforts to regulate young people’s sexualities are gendered and racialized. Her work looks at the apparent contradiction between statutory rape and child marriage laws, understanding how girls’ legal right to consent is constructed by institutions of the state and the family. You can see her essay, “Child Marriage and Sexual Violence in the United States,” in the upcoming volume of Sociological Studies of Children and Youth.

Jamie is also the manager of the the Urban Ethnography Lab, a Graduate Affiliate of the Rapoport Center for Human Rights and Justice, and is completing a doctoral portfolio in Women’s and Gender Studies.

Courses


SOC F302 • Intro To Study Of Society-Wb

83730 • Summer 2019
SB

Description:

This course offers an introduction to the theories, methodologies, vocabulary, and themes of the discipline of sociology. During the semester, we will explore the linkages between individuals and the larger cultures, contexts, and groups in which they live their lives in order to better understand the structure and function of social interaction, human behavior, and the institutional frameworks of society. The overarching purpose of the course is to instill in you the “sociological imagination”, which can then be used to decipher current social issues and patterns of everyday life.  

This is a on-demand online course, meaning that it does not meet in person and is not recorded live. However, the course is not entirely self-paced as students are required to do the following within a given week: watch the week's lecture videos, complete required readings, and participate in an online quiz for each lecture. Students are encouraged to go to http://www.laits.utexas.edu/tower/online/courses/ for additional information and to test your computer and internet connectivity. 

Grading and Attendance:

Attendance is required and participation constitutes 10% of students' final grades. In addition to the daily quizzes, students will complete 5 short papers over the course of the semester. 

Readings:

The following textbook is required and can be purchased at the University Co-op:

Carr, Deborah, Anthony Giddens, Mitchell Duneier, and Richard Appelbaum. 2018. Introduction to Sociology, Seagull Version Eleventh Edition. New York: W.W. Norton and Company. ISBN: 978-0-393- 63945-2. https://books.wwnorton.com/books/webad.aspx?id=4294994899  

All other readings will be posted on Canvas.

Curriculum Vitae


Profile Pages


External Links



  • Department of Sociology

    The University of Texas at Austin
    305 E 23rd St, A1700
    RLP 3.306
    Austin, TX 78712-1086
    512-232-6300