American Studies
American Studies

Holly Genovese


Doctoral Student
Holly Genovese

Contact

Interests


prison abolition, Black literature, hip hop Studies, public art, poetics, prison memoir, southern studies. experimental form, public history

Biography


Holly Genovese is a Ph.D. student in American Studies at UT Austin. She is also working towards graduate portfolios in both Black Studies and Women's and Gender Studies. Her work focuses on African American aesthetic resistance to incarceration in the American South. She is also interested in prison abolition, Black literature, prison literature, and poetics. She received an MA in history at the University of South Carolina with the thesis "They Held Their Fists Up: The Myth of the Violent Black Panther and the Making of the Angola 3" and a BA in History and Political Science at Temple University in 2013. Her article "The Only Panthers Left: An Intellectual History of the Angola 3" was published in the Rapoport Center for Human Rights and Justice Working Paper Series. Her article, "Not a Myth: Quakers and Racial Justice" was published in the March 2015 issue of Quaker Studies. Holly also has work forthcoming in Fabric Journal and the edited collection African Americans at the University of South Carolina: A History. Holly has curated exhibits and written tour scripts for Eastern State Penitentiary, McKissick Museum, and the Philadelphia Society for the Preservation of Landmarks. Her essays and criticism have been published in Teen Vogue, Jacobin, The Washington Post, The LA Review of Books, Literary Hub, Electric Literature, Public Seminar, and The Chronicle of Higher Ed.

 

 

Courses


AMS 311S • Haunting In American Culture

31810 • Fall 2021
Meets MWF 2:00PM-3:00PM BUR 436A
Wr

Ghosts, spirits, haints, and other ghastly forms are often present in American culture: in literature, film, and television. But they are also significant in religious practice, at historical sites, and even in political theory. Why is American culture so taken with the haunted? And what about American history--a history of enslavement, genocide, land removal--makes the figure of the ghost so omnipresent? How can hauntings inform the way we discuss American history, literature and culture? Who believes in ghosts? In the course, I don’t ask you to believe in ghosts but instead to suspend your disbelief as we explore the role of hauntings and whose needs they serve. Can a belief in the ghastly be a form of resistance against modern conceptions of science? This course will also introduce you to the methods and questions inherent in American Studies as a field: what can we learn from media, from culture, from literature, and from history? How does American history and culture look different when viewed through the lens of haunting?

AMS 311S • Prison Art/Lit/Protest-Wb

31515 • Spring 2021
Meets TTH 2:00PM-3:30PM
Internet; Synchronous
Wr

Writing, reading, and discussion on an American studies topic, with emphasis on the evaluation of information, analytical reading, and critical writing. Three lecture hours a week for one semester. May be repeated for credit when the topics vary.

AMS 311S • Prison Art/Lit/Protest-Wb

30510 • Fall 2020
Meets MWF 10:00AM-11:00AM
Internet; Synchronous
Wr

Writing, reading, and discussion on an American studies topic, with emphasis on the evaluation of information, analytical reading, and critical writing. Three lecture hours a week for one semester. May be repeated for credit when the topics vary.

Curriculum Vitae


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