Department of Anthropology

ANT 301 • Bio Anthropology-Honors-Wb

30825 • Kirk, Edward
Meets TTH 12:30PM-2:00PM • Internet
N1
show description

This course is an introduction to the principles and the methods of biological anthropology, the study of human beings from a biological perspective.  It is a field that seeks to explain our relationship to other primates and to the rest of the natural world.  In other words: Who are we? How are we unique? How, why, and when did we come to be the way that we are? The study of biological anthropology requires many different types of knowledge.  Throughout the course, we will examine anatomical, behavioral, and genetic similarities and differences among the living primates, learn the basic mechanisms of evolution, and trace the path of human evolution as reconstructed from the fossil record.  The main goal of the course is to obtain a clear understanding of our place in nature.


ANT 301 • Biological Anthropology-Wb

30830 • Kappelman, John
N1
show description

This course is an introduction to the principles and the methods of biological anthropology, the study of human beings from a biological perspective.  It is a field that seeks to explain our relationship to other primates and to the rest of the natural world.  In other words: Who are we? How are we unique? How, why, and when did we come to be the way that we are? The study of biological anthropology requires many different types of knowledge.  Throughout the course, we will examine anatomical, behavioral, and genetic similarities and differences among the living primates, learn the basic mechanisms of evolution, and trace the path of human evolution as reconstructed from the fossil record.  The main goal of the course is to obtain a clear understanding of our place in nature.


ANT 301 • Biological Anthropology-Wb

30765-30820 • Reed, Denne
N1
show description

This course is an introduction to the principles and the methods of biological anthropology, the study of human beings from a biological perspective.  It is a field that seeks to explain our relationship to other primates and to the rest of the natural world.  In other words: Who are we? How are we unique? How, why, and when did we come to be the way that we are? The study of biological anthropology requires many different types of knowledge.  Throughout the course, we will examine anatomical, behavioral, and genetic similarities and differences among the living primates, learn the basic mechanisms of evolution, and trace the path of human evolution as reconstructed from the fossil record.  The main goal of the course is to obtain a clear understanding of our place in nature.


ANT 302 • Cultural Anthropology-Wb

30835-30890 • Ali, Kamran
Meets W 10:00AM-11:00AM • Internet
CDGC SB
show description

This course focuses on "classic" themes in anthropology such as ethnicity, language, adaptation, marriage, kinship, gender, religion, and social stratification.  We will consider anthropological theory from its 19th-century origins to the present.  The course also explores the nature of ethnographic field work, especially the relationship between the anthropologist and the field community.  
The lectures, readings, and films for this course have been selected with the objective of exploring the social meanings with which diverse groups invest their life.  By comparing and analyzing the similarities and differences between "us" and "others," both within the borders of the U.S. and abroad, the anthropological perspective can expose some of our own cultural assumptions and enable us to better understand diverse cultures.


ANT 302 • Cultural Anthropology-Wb

30895 • Sturm, Circe
CDGC SB
show description

This course focuses on "classic" themes in anthropology such as ethnicity, language, adaptation, marriage, kinship, gender, religion, and social stratification.  We will consider anthropological theory from its 19th-century origins to the present.  The course also explores the nature of ethnographic field work, especially the relationship between the anthropologist and the field community.  
The lectures, readings, and films for this course have been selected with the objective of exploring the social meanings with which diverse groups invest their life.  By comparing and analyzing the similarities and differences between "us" and "others," both within the borders of the U.S. and abroad, the anthropological perspective can expose some of our own cultural assumptions and enable us to better understand diverse cultures.


ANT 304 • Intro Archaeo Stds: Prehist-Wb

30940-30955 • Franklin, Maria
GC N1
show description

An introduction to archaeology as a discipline.  Three major themes that deal with issues of the past will be covered:

1.  A brief history of the discipline, changing theories about various aspects of the past, and the role that the reconstructions of the past play in national and/or group identities.

2.  A survey of the development of human culture from its beginnings to the rise of civilizations and proto-historical cultures in most areas of the world.  Prehistoric cultures, archaeological sites, and areas of Africa, the Americas, Asia, Europe , and the Pacific will be covered.

3.  Archaeological methods of recovery of information about the past.  Scientific procedures involved in excavation, dating, and preservation of the material record.


ANT 304 • Intro Archaeo Stds: Prehist-Wb

30900-30935 • Valdez, Fred
GC N1
show description

An introduction to archaeology as a discipline.  Three major themes that deal with issues of the past will be covered:

1.  A brief history of the discipline, changing theories about various aspects of the past, and the role that the reconstructions of the past play in national and/or group identities.

2.  A survey of the development of human culture from its beginnings to the rise of civilizations and proto-historical cultures in most areas of the world.  Prehistoric cultures, archaeological sites, and areas of Africa, the Americas, Asia, Europe , and the Pacific will be covered.

3.  Archaeological methods of recovery of information about the past.  Scientific procedures involved in excavation, dating, and preservation of the material record.


ANT 305 • Expressive Culture-Wb

30965-30980 • Campbell, Craig
Meets TTH 2:00PM-3:00PM • Internet
SB
show description

The purpose of this course is to introduce the concept of culture as a crucial dimension of human life. Because we tend to think of thought and action as stemming from individual impulses, we find the notion of a shared, highly variable, but influential force in our lives hard to fathom.  Even if we speak of "society" as a familiar concept, we tend to make of it a uniform, oppressive force, some institution outside ourselves that we individually confront and oppose. Yet only if we can learn to recognize how deeply we share certain assumptions and inclinations with others--but only some others, and to varying degrees--can we appreciate the degree to which culture inheres within us and makes us who we are.


ANT 307 • Culture And Communication-Wb

30985-31010 • Keating, Elizabeth
Meets MW 2:00PM-3:00PM • Internet
CDGC SB
show description

The ability to learn and use language is a quintessentially human characteristic—one that distinguishes homo sapiens from other animal species. Language is simultaneously generated through and generative of social life; the former is a primary resource that we humans use in both the structuring and accomplishment of the latter. These dynamics form the subject of study of linguistic anthropology.

This course is an introduction to linguistic anthropology. It is impossible in a single semester to provide a complete overview of all topics that linguistic anthropologists address, so this course covers selected topics, the selection of which is aimed to illustrate how linguistic anthropologists go about doing their work: the range of topics they examine, the kinds of questions they ask, the types of approaches and methods they utilize, and the sorts of conclusions they reach.


ANT 310L • African American Culture

31024 • Walter, Patrick
Meets MWF 10:00AM-11:00AM BUR 214
CDEWr (also listed as AFR 301, AMS 315)
show description

Please check back with updates.


ANT 311D • Intro To Jewish Studies

31030 • Weinreb, Amelia
Meets MW 12:00PM-1:00PM RLP 0.112 • Hybrid/Blended
EGC (also listed as J S 301, MES 310, R S 313D)
show description

Course Description

This survey course aims to expose students to major themes in Jewish Studies through guest lectures by UT faculty who work in the field. It is recommended for motivated undergraduates in any discipline with an intellectual curiosity about Jewish Studies, but requires no previous knowledge of Jewish religion, ethnicity, or culture. The material in the course is not designed be comprehensive, but rather provides a curated sample of lectures and core topics. This semester, the course is organized around three thematic units: 1) Exile and Diaspora, 2) Jewish Identity, and 3) Jewish Ethics.

The weekly rhythm of the course is generally as follows: On Mondays and Wednesdays, various faculty associated with Jewish Studies will visit the classroom and deliver lectures concentrating on their period, geographical area, and field of research as they relate to the thematic unit at hand. Fridays are a series of lively, fast-paced, interactive meetings, led by students. Students are encouraged to consider course materials comparatively, in view of both their distinct features and their overarching threads, and defend positions through evidence based both on lectures and the course reader. Student discussion leaders, designated in advance, will raise questions, stimulate debate, and integrate ideas into our collective analysis.


ANT 322G • Cultural Geographies Israel

31040 • Weinreb, Amelia
Meets MW 1:00PM-2:00PM RLP 0.126 • Hybrid/Blended
GC (also listed as J S 365D, MES 341)
show description

This multidisciplinary, interactive, hybrid seminar is designed to foster conversation and creative projects about the cultural geography of Israel between upper-division students with interests in Jewish studies, Middle Eastern studies, anthropology, and geography. What makes this course unique is that it about 50% of the course is taught online from Israel by Dr. Amy Weinreb. To enhance absorption of course
texts, students will have the opportunity to virtually join the instructor in various locations in Israel throughout the semester using Zoom, and also GoPro technology. The aim is to bring Israel’s contemporary spaces, places and landscapes to life visually.


ANT 322J • Goddesses World Relig/Cul

31045 • Selby, Martha
Meets TTH 2:00PM-3:30PM WEL 3.502
GC (also listed as ANS 340F, R S 373G, WGS 340)
show description

This course will provide a historical and cross-cultural overview of the relationship between feminine and religious cultural expressions through comparative examinations and analyses of various goddess figures in world religions.  We will begin our study in Asia; specifically in India, where goddess worship is a vital part of contemporary Hinduism in all parts of the subcontinent.  From the goddesses of the Hindu tradition (K?l? and Laks?m?, for example), we will move on to female figures in the Buddhist Mah?y?na pantheon (such as Kuan-Yin, popular in China, Korea, and Japan), and then on to some of the goddesses of western antiquity (Inanna, Isis, Athena, Aphrodite, and Mary in her aspects as mother and intercessor).  We will end the course with a study of contemporary goddess worship in the United States as an important expression of Neo-Paganism.  Issues relating to gender, sexuality, power, and violence (domestic and political) will be emphasized as themes throughout the course.


ANT 322P • Mexican Immigratn Cul Hist-Wb

31050 • Menchaca, Martha
Meets TTH 2:00PM-3:30PM • Internet
CD
show description

This course seeks to develop a student's understanding of the history of Mexican

immigration to the U.S. It will provide an overview of migratory patterns dating

back to the late pre-historic period through contemporary times. The focus of the

course, however, will be current immigration issues dealing with: 1) causes of

Mexican immigration: globalization, Mexican politics, agribusiness, 2) U.S. Law,

3) incorporation, and 4) citizenship.


ANT 322Q • Mex Amer Indig Heritage

31055 • Menchaca, Martha
Meets TTH 11:00AM-12:30PM UTC 3.124
CD (also listed as LAS 324L, MAS 374)
show description

This course examines the cultural prehistory and racial history of Mexican Americans

from 1519 to the present. The purpose of the course is to examine how policies and

laws enacted by the governments of Spain, Mexico, and the U.S. impacted the ethnic

and racial identities of Mexican Americans. The geographic focus of the course is

Mexico and the United States Southwest.


ANT 324G • Environmental Anthropology-Wb

31070-31075 • Cons, Jason
Meets M 11:00AM-12:00PM
GCII
show description

What is the relationship between culture and ecology? How can environments produce

inequalities? Is there such a thing as wilderness? Where is the boundary between the human

and the non-human? How is “nature” understood in different communities? And how do

people around the world live with toxicity, climate change, and other forms environmental

degradation? Environmental Anthropology explores the answers to these questions and more.

The course is designed around a set of key questions and challenges in the anthropological

study of the environment. Its purpose is not to provide a survey of the history of the field, but

rather to introduce students to a set of questions and analytic tools and invite them to quickly

move towards applying them to real-world cases.


ANT 324L • Anthro Of The Himalayas-Wb

31085 • Hindman, Heather
Meets TTH 2:00PM-3:30PM • Internet
CDGCWr (also listed as ANS 361)
show description

This course looks at the history and culture of the Himalayan region, including the northern hills of India, (briefly) sections of Pakistan and Afghanistan, Tibet but especially Nepal. Some understanding of Asian history, politics and religion will be helpful (but not necessary) as our attempt will not be a comprehensive survey of the region. The Himalayas have been the site of a great deal of anthropological attention and as such we will be simultaneously be exploring several key theoretical, historical and methodological issues within the discipline of anthropology as we learn about places and people in the region. Particular attention will be paid to the area as a site for exoticism by the Occident (as the Shangri-la phenomenon), development politics, the environment, mountaineering and tourism as well as the current political tensions in the region. At the conclusion of the class, students should have a stronger idea of the important role this area has played in the political, religious and social imagination of the world and an appreciation of concepts such as ritual theory, social movements, modernity and gender studies.


ANT 324L • Arab Latin Americas-Wb

31089 • Merabet, Sofian
Meets TTH 11:00AM-12:30PM • Internet
show description

Based on the comparative approach between different countries in the Americas, this interdisciplinary course examines the ways in which Arab immigrant identities have been negotiated and coopted socially, but also institutionally, in various countries in the Western Hemisphere. Drawing on textual and visual materials surrounding debates about ethnicity, religion, and citizenship, the course explores the interplay of cultural, social, political and economic factors in shaping what we may call “Arab-(Latin) American identities.” The class is intended to expose students to sociocultural and political issues pertaining to ethnic, national, and religious identity formation in countries such as Argentina, Brazil, Chile, and Mexico. While the perspective of this course will be primarily anthropological, it will also be informed by historical, sociological, and literary approaches. Moreover, in an effort to increase students’ familiarity with Arab-(Latin) American history and culture, the course will closely explore the practices, beliefs, and collective accounts in various parts of the continent and encourages participants to reflect on their own transnational experiences within the increasingly globalized world we inhabit. Among other things, we will work to grasp the similarities and differences regarding everyday ethnic, linguistic, and national politics among Arab immigrants and their descendants living in Latin America today, especially as these are shaped by historical processes associated with war and nation-state-building as well as by the power of representations mobilized in a global world. This class will be taught in a seminar format with occasional lectures given by the instructor.


ANT 324L • Decolonial Intersectionalty-Wb

31088 • Salazar, Joseph
Meets TTH 12:30PM-2:00PM • Internet
show description

This course adopts the concept of intersectionality within feminist thinking to stage conversations about gender, race, and indigeneity in the context of ongoing colonial formations. Intersectionality is a way to think about the interconnections of ideas, events, identities, and relations. Initially meant to bring gender-thinking and race-thinking together, the concept has grown to include other key vectors of power including class, sexuality, ability, religion, and more. While even within critical feminist, gender, and ethnic studies, colonization is often treated only superficially, this course prioritizes it—as an analytic and a structure—by centering Native voices. To this end, the course stages conversations that transit feminist, queer, and critical race theories as well as critical Indigenous theory. We will examine the racialization of indigeneity, the violence of liberal inclusion, and heteropatriarchy as they inform both settler and Indigenous subject formations. Other course topics include Native feminisms, African indigeneities, Black Indians, Asian settler colonialism in Hawaiʻi, Two-Spirit politics, queer indigeneities, Native masculinities, and indigeneity as performance, among other topics. By the end of the semester, students will have developed a working knowledge of how colonization, gender, and race intersect and interlock to produce distinct hierarchies and subjectivities that underpin the continued subjugation of Indigenous peoples and demand broader critical attention.


ANT 324L • Ethnogrphic Theory/Pract-Wb

31115 • Sturm, Circe
Meets TTH 12:30PM-2:00PM • Internet
CDWr
show description

This course explores the complex relationship between anthropological ideas and ethnographic practice. The goals of the course are two-fold: (1) to introduce a broad spectrum of concepts, issues, and theories of culture, and (2) to critically examine how these theories and ideas shape anthropological methods and writings. To do this, we will read and critique five ethnographies on five different cultures, each with vastly different approaches to their respective subjects. In teaching, I use a combination of lecture and discussion, interspersed with various classroom exercises, films and creative writing assignments. We begin the semester by asking, “what is ethnography?” and “what is theory?” Eventually we address more complicated issues such as how the construction of an ethnographic subject is shaped by pre-existing or dominant ideas about culture and how scholarly, political and personal agendas shape research projects, fieldwork strategies and ethnographic texts. We conclude the course by assessing where the study of culture is today, and by writing our own brief, creative ethnographies.

Requirements

Because the course relies upon a blend of lecture and discussion, reading in advance is required. Students should arrive with questions and ideas, and be prepared to discuss readings in class. Students are also required to keep up with the key points presented in each class. If you are having difficulty with any of the ideas presented in class, then it is your responsibility to meet with other students or to attend my office hours to clarify course materials. Please use these opportunities to your advantage! The course also fulfills part of the writing requirements for the School of Undergraduate Studies at UT. Therefore, the course is writing-intensive and will require keeping up with writing assignments throughout the semester. 


ANT 324L • Gis/Rem Sns Archaeo/Pale-Wb

31110 • Reed, Denne
Meets TTH 9:30AM-11:00AM • Internet
CDQRWr
show description

This course surveys archeological and paleontological applications of remotely sensed data such as aerial photography and satellite imagery for use in locating field sites, planning field logistics and conducting landscape analysis. The remote sensing component of the course covers remote sensing data acquisition, image georectification, image processing and classification. The GIS component of the course builds on the remote sensing component and adds to it the analysis of map features stored in databases. The course introduces databases theory and practice, and moves through the various stages of GIS workflow: the planning and design of GIS projects, building geospatial datasets, various methods of geospatial analysis and a short introduction to map layouts and reports. This course covers GIS and remote sensing from an applied perspective and students are expected to invest lab time in completing tutorials on GIS and RS methods as well as applying these methods to individual projects.


ANT 324L • Historic Artifacts

31091 • Franklin, Maria
Meets MW 2:30PM-4:00PM WCP 4.174
Wr
show description

Please check back for updates.


ANT 324L • Inca World-Wb

31120 • Covey, Ronald
Meets TTH 9:30AM-11:00AM • Internet
CDWr (also listed as LAS 324L)
show description

When Francisco Pizarro led an expeditionary force into the Andean highlands in

1532, the Incas ruled the largest native empire to develop anywhere in the Americas. The Incas

ruled millions of subjects living across one of the most diverse regions of the planet, and they left

behind impressive material remains that speak to their organizational and technological abilities.

This course will explore how Inca civilization developed, how the Incas grew from a small

highland state into a mighty empire, and how a small number of Spaniards and their allies were

able to bring the Inca dynasty to an end. We will read accounts of the Incas written in the first

years of Spanish colonial rule, and will also review the latest archaeological discoveries.


ANT 324L • Native Food Sovereignty-Wb

31092 • Hobart, Hiilei
Meets TTH 9:30AM-11:00AM • Internet
Wr
show description

Please check back for updates.


ANT 324L • New Media And Communication

31093 • Handman, Courtney
Meets TTH 11:00AM-12:30PM SZB 330
show description

Please check back for updates.


ANT 324L • Politics And Performance-Wb

31094 • Sidorkina, Maria
Meets TTH 11:00AM-12:30PM • Internet
GCII (also listed as REE 345)
show description

Description: During presidential elections, we often talk as much about how politicians speak as about what they say. This heightened attention to language provides a superb opportunity to dig deeper into our own culture of political communication from “Abe” to “W”: from Obama’s “precisiongrip gesture” to Palin’s “Whitmanesque” forms of address; from Hilary’s register-shifting to Trump’s gestural caricatures. The last election cycle has also given observers cause to examine rhetorical technologies that seem not our own—such as “Kremlin propaganda techniques,” the weaponization of “fake news” and populist demagoguery. Over the course of the semester, students will think through the power struggles of political process by closely attending to language, rhetoric and performance. Combining fieldwork, theoretical speculation and engaged research we will contribute to community knowledge about public speech and civic life, and, in the end, help shape our local public culture.

In our readings, we will trace the rhetorical norms of Euro-American politics from their prehistory to today; and contrast them with technologies of speech prevalent in public spheres that have not been shaped by liberalism—including 4chan forums (the native habitat of the “troll”) and illiberal regimes such as those of the former Soviet Union, where, observers claim, politicians act as if “Nothing is True and Everything is Possible.” Students will read liberal critiques of propaganda and public “manipulation,” as exemplified in works such as George Orwell’s 1984; and get a taste of anti-liberal technologies of communication in Victor Pelevin’s Generation "П". Ultimately, however, we will historicize and deconstruct the binary of “liberal” and “illiberal” cultures of public speech by closely attending to practices of language, rhetoric and performance that circulate across first, second and third-world divides. On the local level, students will conduct group ethnographic exercises focused on how local sites of debate and discussion could be transformed to expand community conversations around issues of local concern.

 

Grading: The bulk of the work over the course of the semester will include reading, conducting research projects, and working towards a final paper. Further specifications for each assignment and the due dates will be posted to the course website. Students are required to:

 Prepare the readings and fully participate in discussing them (10% of grade).

 Weekly paragraph-long responses to the readings, due on the first day of class each week (10%).

 Write occasional in-class, open book, assignments addressing key course concepts (10%).

 Keep an ethnographic journal (10%). 

 Complete research assignments (30%). 

 Submit a final essay of 10-12 pages (30%) which uses the class readings to analyze an example of discussion or debate practice.


ANT 324L • Sacred/Ceremonial Txtls-Wb

31107 • Shirazi, Faegheh
Meets MWF 11:00AM-12:00PM • Internet
GC
show description

Sacred and Ceremonial Textiles:

A Study of Various Rites of Passage

& Cultural Objects in Muslim Societies

Fall 2020

 

Instructor: Professor Faegheh Shirazi

Office Location: Calhoun Hall # 502

Email Address: fshirazi@Austin.utexas.edu

Office hours: MW 10:15-10:45. And 12:0-12:45, Or by appointment

Course Description:

From the birth to death textiles, clothing, and other material culture affects our daily lives. The communicative power of textiles and other types of material objects reflects both the everyday and ceremonial lives of people in a society. Although this course focuses on textiles and material objects indigenous to the Islamic world, some examples of non-Muslim communities will be included to draw a comparison. An attempt will be made to shed light on the culture of various Islamic societies. The study of the social and historical background of a community is essential for the interpretation of meanings and symbolism associated with textiles and other elements of material objects. Such a study will be combined in the course with topics like ceremonial gatherings; ceremonial textiles; adornment (jewelry, tattoos, body painting); body modifications (piercing and body-reshaping); and the role of material objects in public and private celebrations. One of the areas which material objects represent relates to practices of rituals, taboos, and rotes of passage in the societies, which can be traced to the pre-Islamic era. Muslim communities in Africa, Asia, and the Middle East will be the primary focus of the course, and an attempt will be made to trace the common origins of ritual practices and their representation as a result to of diffusion and contact with other regional practices. Course presentations will be supported by videos, slide show and various material objects.

Prerequisite:  Upper Division Standing

 

Requirements:  Regular class attendance, active class participation, in class presentations, and contribution to class discussions, two in class exams, and 3 quizzes.

 

Attendance Policy: Attendance is mandatory and counts towards student’s final grade. Undocumented absence will affect the attendance grade.

 

Texts and Readings:  Reader Packet (Available at: Jenn’s Copy and Binding) 218 Guadalupe -512-4820779

 2200@jennscopies.com

Grading:

Attendance                                                                                    5%

Active Participation, and in class article presentation            5%     

One article  summary & presentation                                          10%

3 Quizzes (Lowest will be dropped)                                            20%

First Exam                                                                                   30%                       

Second Exam 


ANT 324L • US Lang Diversity/Conflict

31108 • Slotta, James
Meets MW 2:30PM-3:30PM PAR 1
CD
show description

A remarkable number of languages are currently spoken in the United States, though the prominence of English in many parts of the country often masks that fact. This linguistic diversity has been a major source of conflict as different groups rally to support very different visions of the linguistic future for their communities and for the United States. Over the course of the semester, we will explore some of the linguistic diversity found in what is now the United States. And, we will look at some of the major institutional and political efforts to reshape this diversity. We will explore the incredible variety of indigenous languages spoken in North America, considering attempts to suppress them as well as contemporary efforts at revitalization and renewal. We look at the tremendous variety of languages spoken by migrants in the course of the nation’s history, and the complex politics and practices of multilingualism that ensue. And, we look at English as itself a wildly diverse language, comprising a wide-range of different dialects and sociolects. Throughout, we pay careful attention to the politics of language and the institutions that serve to uphold the hegemony of English monolingualism as a de facto national linguistic standard. We consider how the power of English has shaped the fates of other languages and their speakers. And we consider some of the ways the language scene in the US is developing at present, both through self-conscious efforts at resistance and revitalization as well as through latent transformations brought on by the rise of globalization and neoliberalism.


ANT 324R • Daily Life In Mesoamerica-Wb

31125 • Rodriguez, Enrique
Meets MW 1:00PM-2:30PM • Internet
GC
show description

In this course we will study the daily life of people in Mesoamerica, from the earliest inhabitants in the region to the myriad ways that Precolumbian life and archaeology affect the lives of people today. We will examine production strategies, agriculture, cooking, household life, burial practices, beautification, the life of children, gender, sexuality, ethnicity, and many other aspects of daily life. We will pay close attention to variation and continuities through space and time in Mesoamerica, and between different Mesoamerican cultures. We will study a variety of archaeological sites ranging from the small rural site of Chan in Belize, to the giant city of Teotihuacan in Mexico, from Joya del Cerén (buried in volcanic ash) to Tenochtitlan (buried under modern Mexico City), and many others. While we will study daily life as a worthy object of study in and of itself, we will also examine the relationship between daily life and broad political and economic patterns, including the formation of ranked societies, warfare, and empire-building.


ANT 325E • Ethnographies Of Emotion-Wb

31130 • Stewart, Kathleen
Wr
show description

This course will be a writing flag. It will be run as a writing workshop with weekly writing assignments on topics including place, character, objects, subjects, cultural forms, everyday life and feeling states or structures such as trauma, love, hope, depression, the even keel and melodrama. We will explore how to articulate structures of feeling with models of culture and the self. We will carefully examine and experiment with modes of ethnographic attention, the importance of the telling detail and methods of participant observation. 


ANT 325G • Technoculture-Wb

31135 • Hartigan, John
Meets MW 1:00PM-2:30PM • Internet
show description

This class examines the many technological mediums that saturate daily life, asking how they shape our selves and our interactions with others. We begin by dissecting attention—what do we focus on, for how long, and with what affects? Attention is more than a personal matter; it has many collective forms, as well as biological dimensions. We’ll think about how we value some forms of attention and deride others, depending on social contexts and cultural sensibilities. Then we’ll sift through the layers of technological mediation that alternately facilitate, channel, or diffract our abilities to attend to relationships, objects, and the world around us. With these patterns and tendencies established, we’ll turn to analyze how media systems and technological infrastructures intentionally organize and mine collective forms of attention—online, certainly, but increasingly in real-world settings. We will sample various ethnographic techniques and methods—digital and traditional—then try these out in developing brief analytical accounts of the cultures of technologies that permeate social worlds today. We’ll conclude with some reflections on how the human and the social are being actively redefined today. The aim of this class is to encourage new forms of intellectual engagement; no technological expertise is required.  


ANT 325Q • Practices Of Looking-Wb

31140 • Campbell, Craig
Meets MW 2:30PM-4:00PM • Internet
show description

Students in this class will develop skills associated with the critique and use of different forms of digital and analogue media. They will develop sensibilities for the examination of vision as a cultural practice. Participants will develop methodological and analytical tools associated with Visual Anthropology. This course will explore the history of the visual in anthropology as seen in the production of photographs, films, and videos. We will explore themes of media, mediation, everyday life, “the gaze,” documentary forms, materiality, technology, realism and representation, as well as ethics. This course will introduce participants to critical approaches and analytic methods that broaden their toolkit for describing the world and the ways in which it is culturally and historically mediated. 


ANT 325U • Austin Jews Cvl Rights Era-Wb

31145 • Seriff, Suzanne
Meets TTH 12:30PM-2:00PM • Internet
CDII (also listed as AMS 324J)
show description

Segregation protests, sit-ins, free love, flower power—Revolution was in the air on 1960’s college campuses—UT included. Where were the Jews? In/out? Right/Left? Greek/geek? Activist/Pacifist? Gay/Straight? White/Other? Students will learn the art of oral history and digital storytelling to uncover the untold tales of UT’s Jewish students in the Age of Aquarius.


ANT 326F • Great Discov In Archaeology-Wb

31149 • Wade, Maria
Meets MW 11:30AM-1:00PM • Internet
GC
show description

Archaeology shapes the way we understand the human past, and the history of archaeology was shaped by the great discoveries in archaeology and the people who made them. For instance, things that today we take for granted, such as travel agencies, photography, and postcards, or how we understand the politics of modern archaeology and our role in them, or the claims of countries for the return of art objects are all connected to the history of archeology and its discoverers. This course surveys the stories and myths behind some of those discoveries as well as the background of the discoverers. In the process we will discuss how they acquired knowledge, formulated hypotheses, and the impact their early discoveries had on the ways we know the world, think about ourselves, and on how archaeology is practiced today.


ANT 326L • Cultures In Contact-Wb

31150 • Covey, Ronald
Meets TTH 11:00AM-12:30PM • Internet
CDGCWr (also listed as LAS 324L)
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"Cultures in Contact" is a multi-disciplinary course which combines Historical, Anthropological, Geographical and Literary analyses of the continuing "contact period" in the New World.  The issues addressed span the last 500+ years of cultural interaction in the Americas, looking especially at the processes of cultural interaction, competition, cooperation, and synthesis that have taken place among people from the Americas, Europe, Africa, and Asia.


ANT 330C • Theories Of Culture & Society

31155 • Keeler, Ward
Meets TTH 2:00PM-3:30PM GEA 105 • Hybrid/Blended
Wr
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The purpose of this course is to introduce students to a set of core ideas and propositions in social

theory broadly and theories of culture and society specifically. The course aims to do this by teaching

strategies for thinking with and against, writing about, using, and engaging theoretical texts. The course

works forward from the mid-19th century, engaging a highly selective set of thinkers who provide core

foundations in contemporary social and anthropological thought. It then moves into a series of

explorations of the ways that anthropological theories of culture and society written in the early and

mid-twentieth century continue to fuel debates in anthropology today. It closes with a brief

introduction to a series of transformations in social and cultural theory from the 1970s forward,

particularly postcolonial theory and post-structuralism. The course makes no claim to be

comprehensive. Rather, it aims to teach students how to work with and through social theory and to

prepare them for further encounters with social theory in academic work and in the “world beyond.”

The course is conceived primarily for majors but above all for students who are committed to working

with difficult, influential, and fascinating texts. The course combines lecture and seminar discussion. The

course integrates an intense and demanding regime of reading and discussion with an equally intense

and demanding program of writing. The aim is to encourage students to develop the habit of writing

clear and concise prose, especially when engaging with difficult and complex ideas.


ANT 346L • Primate Social Behavior-Wb

31165 • Lewis, Rebecca
Meets MWF 11:00AM-12:00PM • Internet
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This course focuses on the study of primate social behavior. It explores the basic theoretical principles that guide primatologists.

Topics covered include: evolutionary theory, primate diversity, social and mating systems, sexual selection, life history, cooperation, competition, intelligence, communication, and human behavior.


ANT 346M • Comparative Primate Ecology-Wb

31170 • Lewis, Rebecca
Meets MWF 10:00AM-11:00AM • Internet
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Comparative Primate Ecology will explore the following topics with respect to primates: population ecology, community ecology, feeding adaptations, foraging strategies, ranging behavior, and life history strategies.


ANT 348K • Evol Anatomy Of Head Neck-Wb

31175 • Kirk, Edward
Meets TTH 9:30AM-11:00AM • Internet
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Evolutionary Anatomy of the Head and Neck is a course designed for upper division undergraduates in biological anthropology, vertebrate paleontology, biological sciences, human biology, and pre-medical majors. The objective of this course is to provide a detailed overview of the comparative and functional anatomy of the head and neck, with a special emphasis on the teeth and cranium. The taxonomic focus of this course is foremost on humans, followed by other primates, other mammals, and other vertebrates. In addition to the gross anatomy of the head and neck, an emphasis will be placed on understanding the functional and phylogenetic significance of macroevolutionary transformations of cephalic structures through time. The format of the course includes lecture, discussions, and in-class laboratory components.


ANT 366 • Anat/Bio Human Skeleton-Wb

31190 • Kappelman, John
II
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This course introduces the student to an in-depth study of the human skeleton. Class sessions combine lecture and laboratory sessions and cover topics including developmental biology, functional morphology, and skeletal identification, with a special focus on the latter skill as it relates to forensics and archaeological studies. Students will also be introduced to new 3D imaging techniques for studying the skeleton. 

This class requires both intensive in-class and out-of-class preparation. Participants must be prepared to handle actual human osteological specimens and have a professional approach to this subject and the human remains. An interest in human skeletal identification is especially applicable to the fields of archeology, physical anthropology, health sciences, law, and law enforcement.


ANT 380K • Spanish Missions-Wb

31215 • Wade, Maria
Meets TH 2:00PM-5:00PM • Internet
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The course addresses the development of the mission as an institution from its beginning through the secularization process. The focus will be on the Franciscan missions in northern Mexico (Coahuila), Texas and California (1600s through 1800s). We will discuss the Laws of the Indias regarding the enslavement of Native Americans, the concept of “reducción” in light of the policies of Christianization, Catholic rituals and their impact on Native American groups, daily routines, the politics and economics of the use of the Native American labor force, and gender issues related to role assignments and division of space. We will consider the differences between the Jesuit and Franciscan ethos and its influence on missionary work and the institution, particularly the differences between missions for agriculturists and those established hunting and gathering Native populations.


ANT 391 • Anthropology Of Religion

31230 • Keeler, Ward
Meets F 9:00AM-12:00PM WCP 4.120
(also listed as R S 383T)
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The  seminar will focus on recent anthropological monographs rather than classic, older literature. Readings will include work on ethics that has come to displace some discussion of religion in recent years. Ethnographies will be drawn from several regions of the world. Students will be expected to submit weekly comments as the basis for our discussion, a mid-term essay, and a final project. Propsective students are welcome to contact me to discuss their specific interests.


ANT 391 • Cities And Citizenship-Wb

31235 • Ali, Kamran
Meets T 9:30AM-12:30PM • Internet
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The class will focus on how recent scholarship on cities has concentrated on the informal sector, rural-urban migration and peri-urban spaces. During the course of the semester the students will engage with material from the different regions of the world to address some of the following questions: Does the city represent a site of personal autonomy and political possibilities for women/men? At different moments public discourse in distinct societies has produced the city as both site of modern citizen-making and site of corruption/ pollution. How have different classes of people in distinct temporalities/spatialities negotiated these tensions? How do urban politics and policies reshape households and communities' relationship to the city? What political space is provided for subjects to resist or renegotiate state sponsored attempts to re-order the urban landscape?


ANT 391 • Indig Activ/Solid/Pol Power-Wb

31240 • Hobart, Hiilei
Meets TH 2:00PM-5:00PM • Internet
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This graduate seminar examines the long history and current context of Indigenous political activism. These movements, often forged in solidarity with other Indigenous communities, as well as Black people, brown people, and settlers, engage urgently with the tensions - and promises - that underpin theories of political power, sovereignty, territoriality, dispossession, and cultural identity. Readings for this course will hedge closely to Native North America before extending comparatively to Oceania, Palestine, and South America in order to think broadly about the effects of globalization and neoliberalism; climate change and environmental racism; and extractive regimes and racial capital upon Indigenous communities around the world. This material will, then, help us to envision the kinds of decolonial futures proposed by the activists, scholars, and artists encountered in this course.

 

 


ANT 391 • Narratives Of Space-Wb

31245 • Merabet, Sofian
Meets T 2:00PM-5:00PM • Internet
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This graduate seminar deals with the anthropological analysis of space, with a special emphasis on urban culture. It does not provide an inclusive overview over the extensive literature on the subject, but attempts at communicating important concepts and philosophies that are at the forefront of contemporary debates within the disciplines of Anthropology and Urban Studies. This includes the close reading of key texts written by such influential theorists like Gaston Bachelard, Henri Lefebvre and Michel de Certeau. Further, the material to be read will enable us to assess the impact of colonial policies on cities in geographical areas around the globe. Next to examining some of the major current debates in qualitative social science, the seminar will critically consider how the issues raised in class can be applied to the study of present-day cities in the US and abroad, especially in terms of differing understandings of what constitutes intimate and public space. 


ANT 391 • Nonhuman Agency-Wb

31255 • Crosson, Jonathan
Meets TH 3:00PM-6:00PM • Internet
(also listed as LAS 391, R S 383C)
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According to Webb Keane, colonial Christian missionaries were preoccupied with the agency of non-human entities.  While they saw the agency of spirits, animals or objects as the improper or false beliefs of non-Christian others, the very practices of the missionaries’ own modern European culture were haunted by the language of fetishism and animism.  While these terms were invented by Western scholars to describe the beliefs of colonial others, they were also used to characterize capitalism and bourgeois subjectivity by some of the key theorists of modern Europe.While examining how the categories of animism and fetishism were deferrals of peculiarly Western social tensions onto colonial others, we will also examine “animism” and the agency of objects on their own terms.  What are the implications of assuming that material objects or non-human animals are subjects with the ability to intervene in social worlds?  We will focus on Siberian shamanism and hunting, Marxist and Freudian conceptions of the fetish, Afro-Cuban ngangas and the category of animism in Indonesia to answer these questions.

Texts

Eduardo Viveiros de Castro.  The Inconstancy of the Indian Soul:  The Encounter of Catholics and Cannibals in 16-century Brazil (Chicago:  Prickly Paradigm Press, 2011)

Todd Ramón Ochoa.  Society of the Dead:  Quita Manaquita and Palo Praise in Cuba (Berkeley:  University of California Press, 2010)

Rane Willersle.  Soul Hunters:  Hunting, Animism, and Personhood Among the Siberian Yukaghirs (Berkeley:  University of California Press, 2007)

Webb Keane.  Christian Moderns:  Freedom and Fetish in the Mission Encounter (Berkeley:  University of California Press, 2007)

Bruno Latour.  On the Modern Cult of the Factish Gods.  (Durham, NC:  Duke University  Press, 2010)


ANT 392K • Intro To Grad Archaeology-Wb

31265 • Rodriguez, Enrique
Meets T 2:00PM-5:00PM • Internet
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This course will provide a developmental overview of theoretical and methodological issues in archæology.  The course will emphasize readings related to how we think about archæology as a social science, its concepts and methods, and its relation to history and anthropology.  The course will consist of fourteen lecture-discussion sessions.


ANT 392L • Bio Anthro: Morph/Evolution-Wb

31270 • Shapiro, Liza
Meets T 2:00PM-5:00PM • Internet
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This course is part one of a two semester graduate core curriculum in biological anthropology. Topics covered will include the history of the field of biological anthropology, evolutionary theory, primate systematics, methods of phylogenetic reconstruction, primate diversity and anatomical adaptations, and the human and nonhuman primate fossil record.  The goal of the course is to provide an overview of the field, while allowing students to identify areas of research they might pursue at the master’s and doctoral levels.


ANT 392M • Intro To Grad Social Anthro-Wb

31275 • Peterson, Marina
Meets T 9:30AM-12:30PM • Internet
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This course introduces doctoral students to major texts in sociocultural theory that have been central to the development of the discipline of anthropology from its colonial roots in North America and Western Europe to the contemporary period. While not a comprehensive history of anthropological theory, this course provides a chronological and contextualized perspective as it explores and interprets the relationships between varying and, at times, competing theoretical, epistemological, and ethical claims on anthropology and related disciplines. Based on classical scholarship by some of the “founding fathers” of modern social science, this course traces parts of the genealogical trajectories taken by the anthropological study of culture and society. Following that intellectual legacy, this course asks a central question: How can we make sense of sociocultural anthropology as an academic discipline today? Problematizing the role the concept of “culture” has played in shaping the idea of the “field,” we will look at “location” as a principal site of epistemological limitation and possibility for anthropological research.


ANT 393 • Discourse Power Knowledge

31280 • Slotta, James
Meets T 2:00PM-5:00PM WCP 4.174
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In this course we explore the relationship between power, knowledge, and discourse. How is knowledge produced and transmitted, and what is the role of power in this process? How is power exercised, and what is the role of knowledge in its operation? We consider a wide range of ways in which these questions have been asked and answered, reading classics of poststructuralism (Foucault, Bourdieu) and the philosophy of science (Kuhn, Hacking) as well as discussions of expertise, facts, social constructionism, and other related topics within science studies, anthropology, gender studies, media studies, and political theory.

 

 


ANT 394M • Sensitizing Theory-Wb

31284 • Stewart, Kathleen
Meets F 9:00AM-12:00PM • Internet
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Sensitizing Theory emphasizes modes of attunement, haptic encounters, material and affective forces, and a more than human sensorium. It attends in particular to interconnections between doing, thinking, and making - to thought as practice, writing as thought, and the sensory capacities of media. 

The seminar will be an interplay of two methods

  1. a writing workshop. We will all write 500 words a week spinning off readings and research. Three people at a time will read their work in a cluster while the others listen compositionally, taking detailed notes and thinking creatively in response.
  2. sensory ethnographic outings with media engagement of your choice. This might be collective, as in a trip to the Tower herbarium where we draw together, or a quick response to the Power Plant (or elsewhere) in writing, sound, or images. These will be shared and discussed.

Everyone will choose a semester’s project, building it in pieces, from angles, aspects, registers.  Your project could be a draft of a dissertation chapter or a master’s thesis, an article, a short story, a film, a sound piece, a series of experiments …

Readings will consist of articles and selections from books including:

Stuart McLean. Fictionalizing Anthropology.

Erin Manning. Thought in the Act.

Jason Pine. The Alchemy of Meth: A Decomposition. 

Robert Desjarlais. The Blind Man.

Michel Serres. The Five Senses.

Peter Sloterdijk. Bubbles.

Povinelli. Geontologies: A Requiem to Late Liberalism.

Nancy. Corpus (or Sense of the World).

Jane Bennett. Vibrant Matter.

Laplantine. The Life of the Senses: Introduction to a Modal Anthropology.

Latour, “Sensitizing”

Yusoff, “Insensible Worlds: Postrelational Ethics, Indeterminacy and the (K)nots of Relating”

von Uexküll, “A stroll through the worlds of animals and men: A picture book of invisible worlds”

Hustak and Myers, “Involutionary Momentum: Affective Ecologies and the Sciences of Plant/Insect Encounters”

Hugh Raffles, “25 Years is a Long Time” 

Simondon, “On Techno-Aesthetics”

Bennett, “De Rerum Natura” 

Diana Coole. New Materialisms

Christine Hume, Ventrifacts.


ANT 432L • Primate Anatomy-Wb

31160 • Shapiro, Liza
Meets TTH 11:00AM-12:30PM • Internet
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An exploration of the relationship between primate anatomical form and function, with emphasis on adaptations to diet and locomotion.  The course is also designed to demonstrate how such information can be applied to the fossil record in order to reconstruct the evolutionary development of primate adaptations.

There is a two hour lab section associated with this class.


ANT 453 • Archaeological Analysis-Wb

31180 • Valdez, Fred
Meets MW 10:00AM-12:00PM • Internet
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The purpose of this course to provide you (the course participants) with a background to “the kinds” of archaeological analyses that often occur, “what” is involved in archaeological analysis, and “how” archaeological analysis may be approached. This means learning what questions to ask about a field or laboratory project and the steps needed to understand the type of analysis required. From this course you should also become aware of “how to do” an analysis from start (first learning about certain material culture) to completion (doing the analysis and the report writing).

 

 

Prerequisite: Anthropology 304 or Archaeology 301.