Department of Anthropology

ANT 301 • Biol Anthropology-Honors-Wb

31760 • Kirk, Edward
Meets TTH 12:30PM-2:00PM • Internet; Synchronous
N1
show description

This course is an introduction to the principles and the methods of biological anthropology, the study of human beings from a biological perspective.  It is a field that seeks to explain our relationship to other primates and to the rest of the natural world.  In other words: Who are we? How are we unique? How, why, and when did we come to be the way that we are? The study of biological anthropology requires many different types of knowledge.  Throughout the course, we will examine anatomical, behavioral, and genetic similarities and differences among the living primates, learn the basic mechanisms of evolution, and trace the path of human evolution as reconstructed from the fossil record.  The main goal of the course is to obtain a clear understanding of our place in nature.


ANT 301 • Biological Anthropology-Wb

31765-31820 • Shapiro, Liza • Internet; Synchronous
N1
show description

This course is an introduction to the principles and the methods of biological anthropology, the study of human beings from a biological perspective.  It is a field that seeks to explain our relationship to other primates and to the rest of the natural world.  In other words: Who are we? How are we unique? How, why, and when did we come to be the way that we are? The study of biological anthropology requires many different types of knowledge.  Throughout the course, we will examine anatomical, behavioral, and genetic similarities and differences among the living primates, learn the basic mechanisms of evolution, and trace the path of human evolution as reconstructed from the fossil record.  The main goal of the course is to obtain a clear understanding of our place in nature.


ANT 301 • Biological Anthropology-Wb

31825 • Kappelman, John • Internet; Asynchronous
N1
show description

This course is an introduction to the principles and the methods of biological anthropology, the study of human beings from a biological perspective.  It is a field that seeks to explain our relationship to other primates and to the rest of the natural world.  In other words: Who are we? How are we unique? How, why, and when did we come to be the way that we are? The study of biological anthropology requires many different types of knowledge.  Throughout the course, we will examine anatomical, behavioral, and genetic similarities and differences among the living primates, learn the basic mechanisms of evolution, and trace the path of human evolution as reconstructed from the fossil record.  The main goal of the course is to obtain a clear understanding of our place in nature.


ANT 302 • Cultural Anthro-Honors-Wb

31830 • Slotta, James
Meets MW 1:00PM-2:30PM • Internet; Synchronous
GC SB
show description

This course focuses on "classic" themes in anthropology such as ethnicity, language, adaptation, marriage, kinship, gender, religion, and social stratification.  We will consider anthropological theory from its 19th-century origins to the present.  The course also explores the nature of ethnographic field work, especially the relationship between the anthropologist and the field community.  
The lectures, readings, and films for this course have been selected with the objective of exploring the social meanings with which diverse groups invest their life.  By comparing and analyzing the similarities and differences between "us" and "others," both within the borders of the U.S. and abroad, the anthropological perspective can expose some of our own cultural assumptions and enable us to better understand diverse cultures.


ANT 302 • Cultural Anthropology-Wb

31840-31885 • Seriff, Suzanne
Meets MW 1:00PM-2:00PM • Internet; Synchronous
GC SB
show description

This course focuses on "classic" themes in anthropology such as ethnicity, language, adaptation, marriage, kinship, gender, religion, and social stratification.  We will consider anthropological theory from its 19th-century origins to the present.  The course also explores the nature of ethnographic field work, especially the relationship between the anthropologist and the field community.  
The lectures, readings, and films for this course have been selected with the objective of exploring the social meanings with which diverse groups invest their life.  By comparing and analyzing the similarities and differences between "us" and "others," both within the borders of the U.S. and abroad, the anthropological perspective can expose some of our own cultural assumptions and enable us to better understand diverse cultures.


ANT 302 • Cultural Anthropology-Wb

31835 • Sturm, Circe • Internet; Asynchronous
CDGC SB
show description

This course focuses on "classic" themes in anthropology such as ethnicity, language, adaptation, marriage, kinship, gender, religion, and social stratification.  We will consider anthropological theory from its 19th-century origins to the present.  The course also explores the nature of ethnographic field work, especially the relationship between the anthropologist and the field community.  
The lectures, readings, and films for this course have been selected with the objective of exploring the social meanings with which diverse groups invest their life.  By comparing and analyzing the similarities and differences between "us" and "others," both within the borders of the U.S. and abroad, the anthropological perspective can expose some of our own cultural assumptions and enable us to better understand diverse cultures.


ANT 304 • Intro Archaeo Stds: Prehist-Wb

31920 • Franklin, Maria • Internet; Asynchronous
GC N1
show description

An introduction to archaeology as a discipline.  Three major themes that deal with issues of the past will be covered:

1.  A brief history of the discipline, changing theories about various aspects of the past, and the role that the reconstructions of the past play in national and/or group identities.

2.  A survey of the development of human culture from its beginnings to the rise of civilizations and proto-historical cultures in most areas of the world.  Prehistoric cultures, archaeological sites, and areas of Africa, the Americas, Asia, Europe , and the Pacific will be covered.

3.  Archaeological methods of recovery of information about the past.  Scientific procedures involved in excavation, dating, and preservation of the material record.


ANT 304 • Intro Archaeo Stds: Prehist-Wb

31890-31915 • Valdez, Fred • Internet; Synchronous
GC N1
show description

An introduction to archaeology as a discipline.  Three major themes that deal with issues of the past will be covered:

1.  A brief history of the discipline, changing theories about various aspects of the past, and the role that the reconstructions of the past play in national and/or group identities.

2.  A survey of the development of human culture from its beginnings to the rise of civilizations and proto-historical cultures in most areas of the world.  Prehistoric cultures, archaeological sites, and areas of Africa, the Americas, Asia, Europe , and the Pacific will be covered.

3.  Archaeological methods of recovery of information about the past.  Scientific procedures involved in excavation, dating, and preservation of the material record.


ANT 304 • Intro Archeol: Prehist-Hon-Wb

31950 • Wade, Maria
Meets TTH 12:30PM-2:00PM • Internet; Synchronous
GC N1
show description

An introduction to archaeology as a discipline.  Three major themes that deal with issues of the past will be covered:

1.  A brief history of the discipline, changing theories about various aspects of the past, and the role that the reconstructions of the past play in national and/or group identities.

2.  A survey of the development of human culture from its beginnings to the rise of civilizations and proto-historical cultures in most areas of the world.  Prehistoric cultures, archaeological sites, and areas of Africa, the Americas, Asia, Europe , and the Pacific will be covered.

3.  Archaeological methods of recovery of information about the past.  Scientific procedures involved in excavation, dating, and preservation of the material record.


ANT 304T • Intro To Texas Archaeology-Wb

31955 • Wade, Maria • Internet; Asynchronous
CD N1
show description

People have been in Texas since about 12,000 years ago and the evidence of their presence throughout time is fascinating.  Ever wondered how we know and can prove that? This course introduces students to Texas archaeology through lectures and interactive virtual labs. Texas geographic and environmental diversity provided prehistoric and historic peoples with unique resources and possibilities, and people used that diversity to make choices and develop specific cultural characteristics while interacting with other peoples from the surrounding regions.

Doing archaeology requires teamwork, critical thinking and multidisciplinary approaches. In archaeology, it is often more important to ask relevant questions than provide ready answers. The lectures and labs in this course aim to emphasize these requirements as well as how archaeology relates to other sciences.

This course may be used to fulfill the natural science and technology component of the common core curriculum and addresses the following four core objectives established by the Texas Higher Education Coordinating Board: communication skills, critical thinking skills, teamwork, and empirical and quantitative skills.


ANT 305 • Expressive Culture-Wb

31960-31965 • Keeler, Ward • Internet; Synchronous
SB
show description

The purpose of this course is to introduce the concept of culture as a crucial dimension of human life. Because we tend to think of thought and action as stemming from individual impulses, we find the notion of a shared, highly variable, but influential force in our lives hard to fathom.  Even if we speak of "society" as a familiar concept, we tend to make of it a uniform, oppressive force, some institution outside ourselves that we individually confront and oppose. Yet only if we can learn to recognize how deeply we share certain assumptions and inclinations with others--but only some others, and to varying degrees--can we appreciate the degree to which culture inheres within us and makes us who we are.


ANT 307 • Cul And Communication-Hon-Wb

31969 • Keating, Elizabeth
Meets MWF 1:00PM-2:00PM • Internet; Synchronous
SB
show description

The ability to learn and use language is a quintessentially human characteristic—one that distinguishes homo sapiens from other animal species. Language is simultaneously generated through and generative of social life; the former is a primary resource that we humans use in both the structuring and accomplishment of the latter. These dynamics form the subject of study of linguistic anthropology.

This course is an introduction to linguistic anthropology. It is impossible in a single semester to provide a complete overview of all topics that linguistic anthropologists address, so this course covers selected topics, the selection of which is aimed to illustrate how linguistic anthropologists go about doing their work: the range of topics they examine, the kinds of questions they ask, the types of approaches and methods they utilize, and the sorts of conclusions they reach.


ANT 307 • Culture And Communication-Wb

31970-31995 • Handman, Courtney
Meets TTH 9:30AM-10:30AM • Internet; Synchronous
CDGC SB (also listed as LIN 312C)
show description

The ability to learn and use language is a quintessentially human characteristic—one that distinguishes homo sapiens from other animal species. Language is simultaneously generated through and generative of social life; the former is a primary resource that we humans use in both the structuring and accomplishment of the latter. These dynamics form the subject of study of linguistic anthropology.

This course is an introduction to linguistic anthropology. It is impossible in a single semester to provide a complete overview of all topics that linguistic anthropologists address, so this course covers selected topics, the selection of which is aimed to illustrate how linguistic anthropologists go about doing their work: the range of topics they examine, the kinds of questions they ask, the types of approaches and methods they utilize, and the sorts of conclusions they reach.


ANT 310L • 9-Aztecs And Spaniards-Wb

32014 • Rodriguez, Enrique
Meets TTH 9:30AM-11:00AM • Internet; Synchronous
(also listed as LAS 315)
show description

Please check back with updates.


ANT 310L • Black Queer Art Worlds-Wb

32010 • Gill, Lyndon
Meets MW 4:00PM-5:30PM • Internet; Synchronous
CDGC (also listed as AFR 315Q, WGS 301)
show description

Please check back with updates.


ANT 310L • Intro To South Asia-Wb

32005 • Maes, Claire
Meets TTH 9:30AM-11:00AM • Internet; Synchronous
GC (also listed as ANS 302K)
show description

Please check back with updates.


ANT 322D • Multicultural Israel-Wb

32025 • Weinreb, Amelia
Meets TTH 12:30PM-2:00PM • Internet; Synchronous
GC (also listed as J S 365C, MES 341)
show description
This multidisciplinary, two-way interactive seminar is designed to foster conversation, research and creative projects about Israel’s multicultural population between upper-division students with interests in Jewish Studies, Middle Eastern Studies and Anthropology. What makes this course unique is that much of it is live-streamed from Israel and/or video-recorded material using GoPro to observe cultural interaction and capture conversation. This year, we will also enhance the absorption of course texts and materials by teaming up with MA students in International Development at the Hebrew University of Jerusalem who are either members of Israel’s multicultural populations, and/or studying marginalized groups within Israel, to join us for discussion, interviews, and exchange of ideas throughout the semester. The aim of these exchanges is to bring Israel’s contemporary populations, and the people who study them to Austin, through a new type of Global Classroom.

ANT 322P • Mexican Immigratn Cul Hist-Wb

32035 • Menchaca, Martha
Meets MW 11:30AM-1:00PM • Internet; Synchronous
CD (also listed as LAS 324L)
show description

This course seeks to develop a student's understanding of the history of Mexican

immigration to the U.S. It will provide an overview of migratory patterns dating

back to the late pre-historic period through contemporary times. The focus of the

course, however, will be current immigration issues dealing with: 1) causes of

Mexican immigration: globalization, Mexican politics, agribusiness, 2) U.S. Law,

3) incorporation, and 4) citizenship.


ANT 324L • Archaeo Of Feast And Famine-Wb

32049 • Dawson, Emily
Meets TTH 2:00PM-3:30PM • Internet; Synchronous
Wr
show description

Please check back for updates.


ANT 324L • Comparng White Nationalisms-Wb

32050 • Ohueri, Chelsi
Meets MW 1:00PM-2:30PM • Internet; Synchronous
GC (also listed as REE 345)
show description

The purpose of this course is to provide students with an opportunity to learn about white nationalism and to examine it in multiple forms. Using a cultural anthropology perspective, the course will focus on the intersections of national identity and race, and in particular whiteness, in Europe and the United States. A significant component of the course will examine historical and newly emergent nationalist ideologies in Eastern Europe. The course will begin with lectures and discussions that give students the chance to critically unpack key terminology (nation, nationalism, race, white nationalism, white supremacy) that are often used in media and popular culture but at the same time, are rarely well-defined and contextualized. Students will read literature from multiple disciplines, including anthropology, European studies, history, political science, and race and ethnic studies. Each week students will complete in-class rapid fire writing responses about the readings before we begin discussions. This course will involve regular shorter writing assignments and a final writing paper. Students will also have the chance to work in small groups on a project. Assignments will include book chapter readings, journal articles, newspaper stories, and one book-length ethnography. The syllabus will also include films. By the end of the course students should be able to understand the concept of white nationalism and its manifestations in multiple forms in Europe and the United States. They should also be able to understand theories of nation, race, and whiteness, and be able to critically reflect on these topics.


ANT 324L • Cont Iss Natv Am Indig Stud-Wb

32054 • Casumbal-Salazar, Iokepa
Meets TTH 9:30AM-11:00AM • Internet; Synchronous
show description

The experiences of Indigenous peoples colonized by settler states are stories of struggle and survival. To understand the contemporary issues impacting Indigenous peoples who remain subjugated within western, patriarchal, capitalist settler societies this course examines the ways in which settler colonization "is a structure and not an event" (Wolfe 2006) and how Indigenous peoples continue to resist those structures. Contrary to popular misconceptions, colonization is not a thing of the past and, in many parts of the world, continues through assertions of military power, imperialist ideologies, neoliberal governance, capitalism, heteropatriarchy, misogyny, and white supremacy.  Themes covered in this upper division course will include federal Indian law and treaty histories, racialization of Indigenous peoples, multiculturalism and cultural appropriation, federal and cultural (mis)recognition, resistance and Native resurgence, tribal sovereignty, decolonization, and more.  Some of the contemporary issues we will explore include the Indigenous defense of water and land through direct community political actions against the Dakota Access Pipeline at Standing Rock; the protection movement at the summit of Mauna Kea where young people are combating a giant telescope from being developed at a sacred site; the organized actions of the Tohono O'odham to stop construction of the border wall; the legacies of violence inherent to DNA sciences and commercial gnomic testing; #MMIWG (missing and murdered Indigenous women and girls) and how gender and sexual violence as tools of colonization; and more.  Centering narrative practices, the course prioritizes Indigenous voices and the allies who stand against colonization in its myriad and persistent forms.


ANT 324L • Cultural Resource Management

32055 • Jarvis, Jonathan
Meets MWF 12:00PM-1:00PM RLP 0.112 • Hybrid/Blended
show description

This course is designed to provide a thorough overview of Cultural Resource Management (CRM), primarily for students who are interested in pursuing a career in archaeology.  Projects funded or permitted by government agencies must comply with various state and federal laws that mandate the identification and investigation of archaeological sites that may be impacted by the project; as a result, the vast majority of the archaeology conducted in the United States is done for compliance purposes.  This course will cover the development of CRM archaeology into a professional discipline, the legal and regulatory environment in which CRM operates, the common methods (and jargon) utilized and, importantly, employment prospects and how to go about gaining employment in CRM.   


ANT 324L • Development And Its Critics

32090 • Hindman, Heather
Meets TTH 12:30PM-2:00PM PAR 301 • Hybrid/Blended
GC (also listed as ANS 361)
show description

This class approaches aspects of the contemporary condition of international aid and development. While people have been seeking better methods of ‘doing good’ in hopes of improving their own lives and those of their community for a long time, this isn’t development, at least as we will discuss it in this class. In the post-colonial era (thus after about 1950), nation-states have created new methods and logics behind their support of/by other nation-states. While governments were long central to the operation of international aid, businesses and NGOs (non-governmental organizations) have gained prominence in recent years. Now, it can often be difficult to disentangle public/private or governmental/non-governmental dimensions. Increasingly (and perhaps especially because of the critique of colonialism), individuals and groups wonder if development is even a good idea. Instead, many actors are promoting ideas of social entrepreneurship or other forms of revenue-generating “aid programs.” The result is an extremely complex landscape behind even the most basic goal of aid - “fewer people starving, suffering and dying.” Beyond this goal, there is little agreement. Rather than approaching the unreasonable goal of deciding what good aid and bad aid is (read this twice - we will not be solving the problem of the right way to do development), we will be looking at two particular aspects of aid: the imbrication of aid into nation-state goals and development as a distinctive type of industry. At the conclusion of the class, students will have a better idea about the decision making that takes place within the development industry and the scope of aid as an economic and social force in the contemporary world.

 

Grading Policy: 

  • Participation/Attendance 15%
  • Reading Responses 30%
  • NGO Analysis 10%
  • Midterm 15%
  • Final 30%

ANT 324L • Enviro Stds In Siberia-Rus

32060 • Wilkins, Evgenia
GC (also listed as HIS 366N, REE 345)
show description

This course focuses on the past and present environmental issues in Russia and the US. Students explore geography, economics, history, and culture through an environmental lens, as well as engage in comparative analysis of policies and resource security (the US and Russia). Each topic includes a lecture by a professor from Irkutsk State University. Students take classes in the city of Irkutsk, the capital of Eastern Siberia, which is located two hours away from Lake Baikal, a World Heritage Site. Throughout the course students enjoy a range of local excursions, including day trips to the lake and surrounding areas. In addition, participants have the opportunity to master Russian language and delve into cultural aspects of life in a vibrant Siberian city.

Grading:

  • Pre-departure meetings and lectures (X14)
  • International Travel Safety Training (X1)
  • Course Readings (X12)
  • In-country Course Lectures/Discussions (TBA)
  • Russian Language Class (X16)
  • Cultural Excursions
  • Weekly Field Journal (X4)
  • Final Research Paper & Presentation 

ANT 324L • Ethnographic Writing-Wb

32110 • Stewart, Kathleen
Meets F 9:00AM-12:00PM • Internet; Synchronous
Wr
show description

Ethnography, meaning writing difference, describes entanglements of forms, forces, bodies, practices, media, materialities, sensibilities and structures of living that constitute a world. It composes with what’s already composed. It can use social science, art, science, creative nonfiction, auto-ethnography and more. It loves the details. It hones in on angles, possibilities, and problematics – what might happen, what things in process might become, what something might be related to. By writing culture, we are learning to describe the precision of how a whole range of things impact lives.

This course is a writing workshop. We will build conceptual skills through writing; here, thought does not precede writing but takes place in working with words. As writers, we’re trying to build our voice, or the ability to develop thoughts by writing with conviction and self-confidence. We are aiming for writing that is clear, direct, descriptive, creative, and actively approaching its object. Write for an audience – your classmates and perhaps also the people you are writing about (what would they think/say about what you’ve written? Would they recognize themselves in it or be interested in the thoughts you’ve had?). Read your drafts aloud to yourself.

Over the course of the semester, the students will write five 500 word descriptive, analytical, artful papers. Each piece should be written in four drafts, using the Peter Elbow’s method in Writing Without Teachers: 45 minutes of fast writing followed by 15 minutes of hard editing to eliminate all but the sentences or sentence fragments you think are true (or that really express your thought, or have real potential).

In seminar, each person will read their work aloud while the others listen carefully and take occasional notes on their own creative lines of thought prompted by each piece (I call this compositional listening). After four readings, we will discuss the four pieces together. Learning to be good readers or listeners is part of the process of learning to be good writers. A writer with skill thinks of her readership and writes to communicate and have an influence. Writing well begins with reading. There will be reading each week and prompts to link the reading to your writing for the week. Students will also keep daily writing journals for the first seven weeks. This is fast, associative writing you can do anywhere. The point is to create the habit of making words on paper. I will not read the content but simply check, once a week, that it’s been done every day. It can literally be “I’m trying to write and I can’t think of anything to say. Oh, but wait a minute, the bus driver just smiled at the student wearing A&M colors. What’s happening here? Did anyone else notice? Is this funny?” There is a final essay, which will be fashioned out of 3-5 of your short pieces and edited, edited, edited. This should be 5-7 pages, double-spaced. Don’t try to come up with a single thesis to subsume the separate pieces but, instead, hold your focus on the particularity of each piece and then look for resonances between them as you select the pieces to piece together. They can remain separate, even divided by an asterisk. Or you may find a writing line that allows you to link the three pieces, editingthem together.

There will be workshops on ethnography, auto-ethnography, editing, voice, descriptive writing, anddescribing a world. There will also be many experiments.


ANT 324L • Gis/Rem Sns Arch/Paleo-Wb

32104 • Reed, Denne
Meets MW 1:00PM-2:30PM • Internet; Synchronous
QR (also listed as GRG 356T)
show description

This course surveys archeological and paleontological applications of remotely sensed data such as aerial photography and satellite imagery for use in locating field sites, planning field logistics and conducting landscape analysis. The remote sensing component of the course covers remote sensing data acquisition, image georectification, image processing and classification. The GIS component of the course builds on the remote sensing component and adds to it the analysis of map features stored in databases. The course introduces databases theory and practice, and moves through the various stages of GIS workflow: the planning and design of GIS projects, building geospatial datasets, various methods of geospatial analysis and a short introduction to map layouts and reports. This course covers GIS and remote sensing from an applied perspective and students are expected to invest lab time in completing tutorials on GIS and RS methods as well as applying these methods to individual projects.


ANT 324L • Indig People: Rus And USsr-Wb

32064 • Campbell, Craig
Meets TTH 2:00PM-3:30PM • Internet; Synchronous
show description

Students will be introduced to theories of colonial critique and visual culture studies as you explore the history of the Indigenous peoples of the Eurasian north. Through carefully chosen English-language materials you will learn about Indigenous peoples through their own words and works. You will also learn about key historical epochs beyond the overly simplistic macro-categories of Imperial Russia/Soviet Union/Post-Soviet Russia. This more nuanced account allows us to better understand how Indigenous peoples function as agents of history in the 20th and 21st Centuries. A hands-on independent research focus in this course will allow students to engage directly with the most challenging ideas identified by Indigenous peoples and scholars today. You’ll learn how to identify tropes and stereotypes and how to get beyond simply classifying them to understanding how they function in society. Major themes in the course include: colonialism, socialist colonialism, borealism through the lens of Indigeneity, northern stereotypes, Indigenous self-representation, photography and printmaking, symbols and ornaments, museums and exhibitions, as well as documentary and fiction films. This course foregrounds the study of digital images (still and moving). We will treat these images as culturally encoded rather than semiotically transparent. That is, students will learn how the meaning accorded to images changes over time and is culturally specific. This frame will train you to apprehend images in their complex movements through transcultural spaces. With a major final project (worth 40% of the final grade) you will become focused on designing and developing a research agenda contribute to a growing public archive on representations of Indigenous peoples in Russia. As this course is taught over multiple years the archive will grow in significance.


ANT 324L • Maya Art/Architecture-Gua

32065 • Runggaldier, Astrid
GCII VP (also listed as GRG 356T, LAS 327)
show description

Please check back for updates.


ANT 324L • Mesoamericn Writing Systems-Wb

32070 • Stuart, David
Meets TTH 12:30PM-2:00PM • Internet; Synchronous
GC (also listed as LAS 327)
show description

Please check back for updates.


ANT 324L • Nature, Society, & Adaptatn

32095 • Knapp, Gregory
Meets TTH 11:00AM-12:30PM • Internet; Synchronous
EWr
show description

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ANT 324L • Pop Cul And Indig Futurties-Wb

32074 • Casumbal-Salazar, Iokepa
Meets TTH 2:00PM-3:30PM • Internet; Synchronous
show description

The course examines Indigenous creative practices within and in response to mainstream popular culture to explore how Indigenous peoples refuse to be contained by colonization. We interrogate settler representations of Indigenous peoples as well as cultural productions by Indigenous peoples that affirm their presence, resilience, and future orientation. Confronting stereotypes around Native disappearance and authenticity that affirm white supremacy, global capitalism, heteropatriarchy, and settler colonization, the course stages an anti-colonial conversation by centering Native voices. To this end, students will explore the radical potential and the contemporary thought and praxis of creative minds building decolonial futures through music, film, television, literature, comic books, social media, fashion, visual art, performance art, and everyday practices.


ANT 324L • Power And Resistance In Rus-Wb

32075 • Sidorkina, Maria
Meets TTH 11:00AM-12:30PM • Internet; Synchronous
GC (also listed as REE 345)
show description

How do political activists in Russia speak to the state? In turn, how does the state encourage, respond to, and censor activist speech? This class will shed light on Russian state power as it is analyzed “from below” by ordinary citizens who seek to shape its politics and policy. We will take protests seriously as events to reveal their place in national and international histories of contention, as well as consider interactions between protest participants and the social and physical spaces in which protests take place. We will also situate Russian protest events with respect to ordinary moments of cultural, social and political life. Finally, we will explore the—often surprising—experiments with collective action that Russian activists have taken up after decades of dealing with illiberal and opaque mechanisms of local and national governance.

As part of thinking about state-citizen interaction beyond the margins of the liberal project, we will get an overview of the history of political speech from Soviet late socialism to the present. We will then take stock of the 2011-2012 Fair Elections protest movement—a pivotal moment in the Putin era—and apply our insights to analyses of state and protest activity since that time. As part of theorizing postsocialist (and in many ways post-liberal) protest, we will unpack some of methodological debates central to Russian protest studies, such as whether we should call properly “political” those actors that who aim to change the political system or those for whom the efficacy of protest is measured by solving problems in particular cases (e.g. wage arrears, environmental destruction, homophobia, etc.)


ANT 324L • Sensing: Elemental Media-Wb

32080 • Peterson, Marina
Meets MW 10:00AM-11:30AM • Internet; Synchronous
Wr
show description

“Sensing: Elemental media as an anthropology for change” will use the cities of Austin and Manchester as sites for sensory ethnographic investigations of urban ecology. The course is organized around air, water, earth, and fire as themes for engaging with the city through media and the senses. These elemental themes will also be addressed in terms of how various forms of media provide means of moving through and sensing the city. In this way, the course foregrounds an ecological, ethical approach that both acts on the city and reflects on its tools and methods of engagement. Students will learn methods of field recording, sound walking, sound mapping, documentary photography, photo-elicitation, interviews, and acoustic archaeology. As a Global Virtual Exchange course, students in Austin and Manchester will exchange material and collaborate on a project, thus gaining knowledge and understanding of global urban processes and ecological concerns. 


ANT 324L • Sex/Power Afr Diaspora-Wb

32105 • Gill, Lyndon
Meets MW 2:30PM-4:00PM • Internet; Synchronous
CDGC (also listed as AFR 345F, WGS 340)
show description

Please check back for updates.


ANT 324L • Sex Violence Power-Wb

32085 • Lewis, Rebecca
Meets W 10:00AM-11:30AM • Internet; Synchronous
show description

Social inequality is pervasive in human and nonhuman primate societies. Why are hierarchies so prevalent and what are the biological consequences of this inequality? What are the different ways power is exercised and communicated? What is the relationship between hormones and aggression? How does sex/gender affect power? What historical and cultural influences have shaped our understanding of power? This class explores the diversity of power relationships and structures across primates, the methods used to document and analyze them, and the theories for why they arise. The class focuses on the biology of social inequality while still taking an interdisciplinary approach, such as investigating evolutionary forces that may make certain power structures more common and the genetic and health outcomes of cultural practices. Students are introduced to a vast interdisciplinary body of literature and practice the skills for identifying assumptions embedded within the theories and methodologies associated with that body of knowledge.


ANT 330C • Theories Of Culture & Socty-Wb

32130 • Ali, Kamran
Meets TTH 11:00AM-12:30PM • Internet; Synchronous
Wr
show description

The purpose of this course is to introduce students to a set of core ideas and propositions in social

theory broadly and theories of culture and society specifically. The course aims to do this by teaching

strategies for thinking with and against, writing about, using, and engaging theoretical texts. The course

works forward from the mid-19th century, engaging a highly selective set of thinkers who provide core

foundations in contemporary social and anthropological thought. It then moves into a series of

explorations of the ways that anthropological theories of culture and society written in the early and

mid-twentieth century continue to fuel debates in anthropology today. It closes with a brief

introduction to a series of transformations in social and cultural theory from the 1970s forward,

particularly postcolonial theory and post-structuralism. The course makes no claim to be

comprehensive. Rather, it aims to teach students how to work with and through social theory and to

prepare them for further encounters with social theory in academic work and in the “world beyond.”

The course is conceived primarily for majors but above all for students who are committed to working

with difficult, influential, and fascinating texts. The course combines lecture and seminar discussion. The

course integrates an intense and demanding regime of reading and discussion with an equally intense

and demanding program of writing. The aim is to encourage students to develop the habit of writing

clear and concise prose, especially when engaging with difficult and complex ideas.


ANT 336L • Natv Amer Culs North Of Mex-Wb

32135 • Sturm, Circe
Meets TTH 12:30PM-2:00PM • Internet; Synchronous
CD (also listed as AMS 321)
show description

This upper-division undergraduate course examines contemporary articulations of indigenous cultures and practices in the U.S. and Canada. Because the present cannot be understood without understanding historically how we got to here, this course includes histories that inform the contemporary. We will cover critical developments that shape and are shaped by late 20th century and early 21st century indigenous life. Issues include but are not limited to the American Indian Movement; IdleNoMore; tribal and First Nation citizenship politics; the politics of race and indigeneity in the U.S. and Canada; gaming and other economic development strategies; residential schools; evolving kinship practices; indigenous feminisms, masculinities, and sexualities; indigenous environmental and religious politics (including how “environment” and “religion” are inadequate for understanding those politics!); food sovereignty movements; and science, technology and Native Americans. Course readings come from anthropology, U.S. and Canadian indigenous studies, history, and cultural studies. We will read scholarly work, blogs, and other popular literature. The course features several guest speakers, some via Skype.

 


ANT 349C • Human Variation-Wb

32145 • Di Fiore, Anthony
Meets MWF 9:00AM-10:00AM • Internet; Synchronous
Wr
show description

This course surveys the patterns of biological variation within and between human populations.  We will examine physical, genetic, and behavioral traits, and consider both the microevolutionary and cultural processes that influence those traits.  We will also discuss how studies of human variation have impacted society in the past and present.  Topics include:  an overview of the principles of genetics and evolution, race, sex differences, human variability in behavior, eugenics and contemporary genetic issues, human plasticity, and disease.


ANT 350C • Primate Sensory Ecology-Wb

32150 • Kirk, Edward
Meets TTH 9:30AM-11:00AM • Internet; Synchronous
show description

Primate Sensory Ecology is a course designed for advanced undergraduates in physical anthropology and the biological sciences. This course provides an opportunity for detailed study of primate sensory systems from an ecological and comparative phylogenetic perspective.
    The core topics covered in this course are the special senses of hearing, vision, and smell, with a special emphasis on the adaptive and ecological significance of sensory adaptations in primates. For each of these senses, lectures and readings will provide a comprehensive review of the following concepts: 1) general anatomy and physiology, 2) development and genetic regulation, 3) functional morphology and mechanics, 4) neural control and regulation, 5) psychophysics, 6) biological role and behavioral ecology, 7) phylogenetic history and fossil record. Additional senses that will be covered in a less-comprehensive fashion include touch, taste, balance and equilibrium, and the Jacobson's organ.
In studying each sensory system, a strong emphasis will be placed on understanding the relationship between variant morphologies and behavioral capabilities. This dual focus on morphology and behavioral ecology will provide students with an explicit understanding of the effect that the  functional design of a sensory system has on an organism's adaptive niche. All information will be presented within a comparative phylogenetic framework, so that evolutionary novelties (e.g., the haplorhine retinal fovea) can be understood in terms of the macroevolutionary processes responsible for the novel feature's appearance. This approach will further emphasize the importance of certain evolutionary changes in primate sensory systems as key innovations. Toward this end, discussions of current literature will cover a number of special topics in addition to the more basic aspects of sensory system morphology and function.


ANT 351E • Primate Evolution-Wb

32155 • Shapiro, Liza
Meets TTH 11:00AM-12:30PM • Internet; Synchronous
show description

This course is an examination of the fossil record for (nonhuman) primate evolution.  The fossil record will be examined after a basic grounding in the anatomy, ecology, and systematics of living primates.  Each of the major radiations of fossil primates will be explored with respect to adaptive diversity, functional morphology, and systematics.


ANT 366 • Anat/Bio Human Skeleton-Wb

32169 • Kappelman, John • Internet; Asynchronous
show description

This course introduces the student to an in-depth study of the human skeleton. Class sessions combine lecture and laboratory sessions and cover topics including developmental biology, functional morphology, and skeletal identification, with a special focus on the latter skill as it relates to forensics and archaeological studies. Students will also be introduced to new 3D imaging techniques for studying the skeleton. 

This class requires both intensive in-class and out-of-class preparation. Participants must be prepared to handle actual human osteological specimens and have a professional approach to this subject and the human remains. An interest in human skeletal identification is especially applicable to the fields of archeology, physical anthropology, health sciences, law, and law enforcement.


ANT 391 • Anthropology And Sports-Wb

32215 • Keeler, Ward
Meets TH 9:00AM-12:00PM • Internet; Synchronous
show description

Although I am a committed runner, I am not knowledgeable about sports and am therefore in some ways an unlikely convenor of this seminar. Nevertheless, the immense appeal of mass-mediated sports the world over makes me intensely curious about why it engages people’s attention so effectively. My impression is that sports constitute a form of social interaction of widespread interest for a number of reasons: as a form of encounter that is taken down to its barest elements; as a metaphor for social relations conceived more broadly; as an instantiation of ideas about status, prestige, competition, and the distribution of power; and as a mechanism in which skill and chance mix in excitingly unpredictable ways. In other words, sports, deemed to be peripheral to “real life,” owe their attraction to the ways that they resonate with it. The readings we do will follow out some of these intellectual leads.

 

The course requirements are as follows: a brief comment on each week’s readings, submitted on line before class; a short mid-term essay (5 to 10 pages); and a final project. The latter can consist either of a research paper on a student’s thesis topic or other related subject matter, informed by the discussions we have had together; or an annotated syllabus intended for a course at the upper-division undergraduate level, with extensive explanations for the inclusion of particular readings as well as the motivating ideas for each topic addressed.


ANT 391 • Culture, History, And Power-Wb

32220 • Ali, Kamran
Meets M 2:00PM-5:00PM • Internet; Synchronous
show description

Culture, History and Power.  In a cross cultural and inter-disciplinary perspective, the course will critically engage with historiographical debates in on issues related to narrative, the history and politics of the archives, the politics of representation and the construction of facts. We will read works by Hayden White, E. P. Thompson, Reinhart Koselleck, Fernand Braudel, Marshall Sahlins, Carlo Ginzburg and Michel-Rolph Trouillot among others. Over the course of the semester we will also follow the debates in Subaltern Historians by scholars like Ranajit Guha, Dipesh Chakrabarty, Gyan Pandey and Partha Chatterjee. Regionally, the course will be broad. While most of the monographs will be on South Asia and the Middle East, there will be ample discussion of European, Latin American and African cases.


ANT 391 • Global Race And Racism-Wb

32230 • Ohueri, Chelsi
Meets T 2:00PM-5:00PM • Internet; Synchronous
(also listed as AFR 381, REE 388)
show description

In this graduate level course, students will trace the concept of race over time and critically examine various socioracial configurations across the globe through an anthropological lens. Though race and racism are often framed as American or Western constructs, this course provides students the opportunity to engage these concepts from a global perspective, as they examine historical and contemporary aspects of race, racialization, and white supremacy. In this course we will ask questions about comparative analysis and how scholars study race in varying local contexts, for example the study of race in Eastern Europe vs. parts of the Americas. In doing so, students will additionally learn more about the relationship between race and related concepts of ethnicity and nation. Additional topics that will be addressed in the course include colonialism, genocide, xenophobia, and anti-blackness.  


ANT 391 • Rsch/Grant Proposal Writing-Wb

32235 • Slotta, James
Meets T 9:00AM-12:00PM • Internet; Synchronous
show description

Rsch/Grant Proposal Writing

This graduate seminar is designed to teach research proposal writing skills that are needed to secure external funding. Over the course of the semester, students will draft a grant proposal that follows the basic outlines of the Wenner-Gren Dissertation Fieldwork Grant. Through weekly submission and small group discussion of proposal sections, students will learn to critique their own and others’ proposals, and hone their skills in this written genre. Along the way, we will discuss how to develop a compelling research question, how to locate one’s project amid various scholarly literatures, and how to identify the research methods needed to answer one’s research question.


ANT 392J • Biol Anthro: Behav/Gen/Var-Wb

32240 • Sandel, Aaron
Meets T 9:00AM-12:00PM • Internet; Synchronous
show description

This course is Part 2 of a two semester core curriculum in biological anthropology. Part 1 is NOT a prerequisite, however. Topics covered will include grouping patterns, reproductive strategies and mating systems, socioecology, cooperation, sex differences in behavior, genomics, population genetics, and evolutionary genetic theory in relation to human and nonhuman primates. The course also explores biological variation in genetic, physical, and behavioral traits within and between populations of humans and nonhuman primates, exploring both microevolutionary and cultural processes that have shaped these traits. (Part 1 emphasizes the history of the field of biological anthropology, evolutionary theory, primate systematics, methods of phylogenetic reconstruction, primate diversity and anatomical adaptations, and the human and nonhuman primate fossil record). The course provides an overview of behavioral ecology, molecular anthropology, and biological variation in human and nonhuman primates. The goal of the course is to give students an overview of the field, while allowing students to identify potential areas of research to pursue at the master’s and doctoral levels.


ANT 392N • Intro To Grad Ling Anthro-Wb

32245 • Webster, Anthony • Internet; Synchronous
show description

An Anthropology Core Course, this course is an introduction to the theoretical and methodological foundations of the study of language from a sociocultural perspective. Topics discussed include linguistic, philosophical, psychological, sociological and anthropological contributions to the understanding of verbal and non-verbal communication as a social activity embedded in cultural contexts. No prior training in linguistics is presupposed. Readings include both ethnographic studies and theoretical work about language.


ANT 392P • Intro To Cultural Forms

32250 • Hartigan, John
Meets W 1:00PM-4:00PM WCP 4.118
show description

Seminar Description: Today cultural analysis is being applied more widely than ever before, across varied domains—expressive, corporate, scientific, and social—that require different types of expertise and knowledge to properly comprehend. In this expansion of the scope of “cultural” as an explanatory framework, a focus on form provides a free-floating type of attention across a range of milieus and mediums. The analysis of form is as ancient as Greek philosophy (e.g. rhetoric) but as current as our interests in the latest technologies. This seminar surveys the variety of ways that an overarching interest in form is fueling interdisciplinary research, particularly in projects that track disparate cultural phenomenon across complex landscapes as they manifest in dense, multi-layered arrangements, often fusing financial, aesthetic, and political interests. We will examine the trend towards melding topic areas—such as “media ecology” or using “publics” with collectives of nonhuman life forms—to devise distinct ways of comprehending emergent cultural objects and activities. Media—as it references an array of substances, instruments, or channels—and mediation (in biotechnologies, communication infrastructures, legal practices, and market expansions) will serve as a basic point of orientation for seminar readings and discussion. Other examples of emergent phenomenon will be drawn from current work in science studies, post-human and biodiversity projects, and urban ecologies, which are each held together by an overriding attention to cultural forms of expression and exchange. The seminar will be divided into thirds: the first provides an overarching framework for an attention to form; the second examines a variety of forms (visual, sonic, urban, etc.); the final third focuses on applying these perspectives.

Seminar Dynamics: This initial stage of the seminar will feature a combination of lectures and readings: the first half of each session will primarily be lecture-oriented with a discussion following in the second half. Depending on the pace of discussions we can shift away from lectures entirely as we progress through the semester. A key objective is for participants to apply these analytical approaches, either in relation to their specific areas of research or in a more general manner. The mechanism for doing this will be a series of short, informal essays (3 or 4) in which participants develop sketches of objects, settings, or dynamics via an attention to cultural form.


ANT 392S • Intro Graduate Feminist Ant-Wb

32255 • Strong, Pauline
Meets F 9:00AM-12:00PM • Internet; Synchronous
show description

This seminar considers the history and contemporary practice of feminist anthropology. After a survey of the impact of first, second, and third wave feminism within anthropology, we will turn to contemporary topics including feminism and science; feminist methodologies; culture and biology; sex, sexuality and gender; the anthropology of reproduction; and the anthropology of power. This seminar considers perspectives from several subdisciplines in Anthropology, and fulfills a core course requirement for Anthropology graduate students.


ANT 393 • Conversation Analysis-Wb

32259 • Keating, Elizabeth
Meets W 9:00AM-12:00PM • Internet; Synchronous
show description

This course is designed to provide the foundations for understanding language in interaction through conversation analysis, an approach to studying human society and culture by focusing on social interaction, including institutional interactions. Students read important texts in conversation analysis (CA) and ethnomethodology across a variety of settings. We discuss the theories influencing conversation analysis as well as the structures of conversation and how these influence how meaning is shaped collaboratively. Each student will do a project using principles of CA learned in the course, applying these methods to short stretches of language data the student has collected or will collect during the course. CA is an excellent tool for analyzing fieldwork materials, such as interviews, oral narratives, conversations, and language in institutional settings. No prerequisites.


ANT 394M • Critical Media Practices-Wb

32260 • Campbell, Craig
Meets W 2:00PM-5:00PM • Internet; Synchronous
show description

This workshop-format seminar builds theoretical foundations for encounters with sensible and sensuous worlds. Through weekly readings, screenings, experiences, and group exercises, we explore ways of knowing, remediating, and evoking as they not only originate in the academy but also from the art world. We look at the way these formations relate to and produce their objects of fascination. Key words like critique, media, intermedia, politics, affect, ethics, and aesthetics are sites of current attention and coalescence in disciplines affliated through the humanities. Readings (which are limited to less than 50 pages per week, and often less than that) will include selections from Jacques Rancière, Kathleen Stewart, Natalie Loveless, George Marcus, Trinh T. Minh-Ha, Erin Manning and Brian Massumi, Tim Ingold, and others. The readings are designed to provide a framework for collective discussions without distracting from individual and small-group readings you may undertake for your independent final project.

Roughly half the classes will be spent actively workshopping projects directly (or indirectly) related to your own research. The other half will be dedicated to a few select readings that help to feel out the edges of emerging discourses on arts-based research (sometimes called research creation). Over the course of the semester I will assign a series of 'obstructions' ... these are mini-projects meant to challenge you to remediate (over and over, under different conditions) your final project.

Past projects by students include websites, software, gallery installations, photo-essays, short videos, illustrated essays, and slide shows. Graduate students in RTF and Studio Arts are encouraged to join this seminar as are students in text-heavy disciplines who are interested in exploring the critical world of multi-sensory research and expression as well as research creation. No previous experience with film, video, photography, or other studio arts is necessary. I work closely with each of you to develop skills plans to ensure completion of your desired final project.


ANT 394M • Worlding-Wb

32265 • Stewart, Kathleen
Meets W 9:00AM-12:00PM • Internet; Synchronous
show description

Worlding theorizes the generativity and brokenness of the sensation of being in a world.  Worldings are not globe-like containers but radically-situated modes of response to a present sensed-out in bodies, affects, aesthetics, and politics. They are both prolific and metamorphic

in the activist occurrent arts of everyday life in which objects, practices and sensitivities become the forceful, subtle, unstable, dreamy and compelling phenomena of world-building.

There is nothing innocent or finished about the sensation of being in a world. In the U.S., for example, tvery sense of a world lives the afterlives of settler colonialism, slavery, the hegemony of a hybrid protestant-secular state, virulent strands of capitalism and inequality, racial criminalization, subcultures and popular cultures set in motion in the face of an official world, all the decompositions of fraud, corruption, and political manipulation that cut short the American century of empire, and the ongoing dreams of an ordinary that could float free or a resistance that could stop the world in its tracks.

Anti-colonial, antiracist, feminist and post-humanist critiques have approached the concept of a single static world as a dangerous blind rhetoric that obscures possibilities of thinking differently. And yet worlding is itself also a constitutive process of differing, an attunement to the potential in what throws together and falls apart, for good or bad. Worldings, now prolific as atmospheres, reverberations, and little worlds of all kinds, mark not only the fact of things but their generativity in the mode of the possible, the not yet, the “as if”, the might have been, and the still unattended.

This is work that approaches Stengers’s cosmopolitics, Deleuze’s plane of immanence, the elemental, self-sensing surround of Whitehead’s speculative realism, Barthes’s incidentals, Foucault’s micropolitics, Merleau-Ponty’s ontology of flesh, Lingis’s imperative, and Jean Luc Nancy’s world at its edges.

Stengers’s thinking through the middle, Haraway’s response-ability, Barad’s coming to matter, Sedgwick’s weak theory, and a wide range of experimental writing crossing fields including autoethnography, post-phenomenology, non-representational theory, new materialism, ficto-criticism, sensory studies, affect studies, flash fiction, and queer, feminist and antiracist studies are all efforts to re-pair composition and critique to better attune to the multiplicitous cuts, passages and wounds in the cohabitation of strange and ordinary worlds, good or bad.

Everyone will choose a semester’s project, building it in pieces, from angles, aspects, registers, or in the mode of a cetain theory or method of approach.  Your project could be a draft of dissertation chapter or a master’s thesis, an article, a short story, a series of experiments in fieldwork…

The seminar is organized as a writing workshop. We will all write 500 good words a week spinning off readings and research. Three people will read their work in a cluster while the others listen compositionally, taking detailed notes and thinking creatively in response.

 

 


ANT 398T • Supv Teaching In Anthro-Wb

32290 • Reed, Denne
Meets W 9:00AM-12:00PM • Internet; Synchronous
show description

The purpose of this course is to provide you with theoretical and practical knowledge

about teaching and learning at the postsecondary level, ultimately to help prepare you for a

teaching position in a higher education setting. Major topics that we will cover include (1)

teaching effectiveness, (2) modes of learning, (3) teaching philosophy, (4) course design, (5)

lecture design and delivery, and (6) graduate education and the demands of academia.