Department of Anthropology

ANT 301 • Biological Anthropology

31325-31390 • Shapiro, Liza
Meets MW 9:00AM-10:00AM JES A121A
show description

This course is an introduction to the principles and the methods of biological anthropology, the study of human beings from a biological perspective.  It is a field that seeks to explain our relationship to other primates and to the rest of the natural world.  In other words: Who are we? How are we unique? How, why, and when did we come to be the way that we are? The study of biological anthropology requires many different types of knowledge.  Throughout the course, we will examine anatomical, behavioral, and genetic similarities and differences among the living primates, learn the basic mechanisms of evolution, and trace the path of human evolution as reconstructed from the fossil record.  The main goal of the course is to obtain a clear understanding of our place in nature.


ANT 301 • Biological Anthropology-Wb

31395 • Kappelman, John
show description

This course is an introduction to the principles and the methods of biological anthropology, the study of human beings from a biological perspective.  It is a field that seeks to explain our relationship to other primates and to the rest of the natural world.  In other words: Who are we? How are we unique? How, why, and when did we come to be the way that we are? The study of biological anthropology requires many different types of knowledge.  Throughout the course, we will examine anatomical, behavioral, and genetic similarities and differences among the living primates, learn the basic mechanisms of evolution, and trace the path of human evolution as reconstructed from the fossil record.  The main goal of the course is to obtain a clear understanding of our place in nature.


ANT 302 • Cultural Anthropology

31400-31455 • Seriff, Suzanne
Meets MW 8:00AM-9:00AM JES A121A
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This course focuses on "classic" themes in anthropology such as ethnicity, language, adaptation, marriage, kinship, gender, religion, and social stratification.  We will consider anthropological theory from its 19th-century origins to the present.  The course also explores the nature of ethnographic field work, especially the relationship between the anthropologist and the field community.  
The lectures, readings, and films for this course have been selected with the objective of exploring the social meanings with which diverse groups invest their life.  By comparing and analyzing the similarities and differences between "us" and "others," both within the borders of the U.S. and abroad, the anthropological perspective can expose some of our own cultural assumptions and enable us to better understand diverse cultures.


ANT 302 • Cultural Anthropology

31460-31475 • Villagran, Jose
Meets MW 12:00PM-1:00PM RLP 0.112
show description

This course focuses on "classic" themes in anthropology such as ethnicity, language, adaptation, marriage, kinship, gender, religion, and social stratification.  We will consider anthropological theory from its 19th-century origins to the present.  The course also explores the nature of ethnographic field work, especially the relationship between the anthropologist and the field community.  
The lectures, readings, and films for this course have been selected with the objective of exploring the social meanings with which diverse groups invest their life.  By comparing and analyzing the similarities and differences between "us" and "others," both within the borders of the U.S. and abroad, the anthropological perspective can expose some of our own cultural assumptions and enable us to better understand diverse cultures.


ANT 304 • Intro Archaeol Stds: Prehist

31480-31505 • Covey, Ronald
Meets MW 9:00AM-10:00AM GEA 105
show description

An introduction to archaeology as a discipline.  Three major themes that deal with issues of the past will be covered:

1.  A brief history of the discipline, changing theories about various aspects of the past, and the role that the reconstructions of the past play in national and/or group identities.

2.  A survey of the development of human culture from its beginnings to the rise of civilizations and proto-historical cultures in most areas of the world.  Prehistoric cultures, archaeological sites, and areas of Africa, the Americas, Asia, Europe , and the Pacific will be covered.

3.  Archaeological methods of recovery of information about the past.  Scientific procedures involved in excavation, dating, and preservation of the material record.


ANT 304 • Intro Archaeol Stds: Prehist

31510-31535 • Valdez, Fred
Meets MW 11:00AM-12:00PM BEL 328
show description

An introduction to archaeology as a discipline.  Three major themes that deal with issues of the past will be covered:

1.  A brief history of the discipline, changing theories about various aspects of the past, and the role that the reconstructions of the past play in national and/or group identities.

2.  A survey of the development of human culture from its beginnings to the rise of civilizations and proto-historical cultures in most areas of the world.  Prehistoric cultures, archaeological sites, and areas of Africa, the Americas, Asia, Europe , and the Pacific will be covered.

3.  Archaeological methods of recovery of information about the past.  Scientific procedures involved in excavation, dating, and preservation of the material record.


ANT 305 • Expressive Culture

31540-31555 • Orlova, Vasilina
Meets T 2:00PM-4:00PM UTC 4.110
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The purpose of this course is to introduce the concept of culture as a crucial dimension of human life. Because we tend to think of thought and action as stemming from individual impulses, we find the notion of a shared, highly variable, but influential force in our lives hard to fathom.  Even if we speak of "society" as a familiar concept, we tend to make of it a uniform, oppressive force, some institution outside ourselves that we individually confront and oppose. Yet only if we can learn to recognize how deeply we share certain assumptions and inclinations with others--but only some others, and to varying degrees--can we appreciate the degree to which culture inheres within us and makes us who we are.


ANT 307 • Culture And Communication

31560-31585 • Handman, Courtney
Meets TTH 9:30AM-10:30AM ECJ 1.202
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The ability to learn and use language is a quintessentially human characteristic—one that distinguishes homo sapiens from other animal species. Language is simultaneously generated through and generative of social life; the former is a primary resource that we humans use in both the structuring and accomplishment of the latter. These dynamics form the subject of study of linguistic anthropology.

This course is an introduction to linguistic anthropology. It is impossible in a single semester to provide a complete overview of all topics that linguistic anthropologists address, so this course covers selected topics, the selection of which is aimed to illustrate how linguistic anthropologists go about doing their work: the range of topics they examine, the kinds of questions they ask, the types of approaches and methods they utilize, and the sorts of conclusions they reach.


ANT 310L • African Diaspora Archaeology

31595 • Franklin, Maria
Meets MW 1:00PM-2:30PM SAC 4.118
(also listed as AFR 317E)
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This course is a comprehensive survey of African diaspora archaeology, an interdisciplinary field that emerged during the late 1960s. As the civil rights and Black power movements fueled the founding of Black studies programs, so too did they influence this pivot in Americanist archaeology toward, initially, the study of slavery. Early research questions focused on the survival of African worldviews and practices, or Africanisms, within the context of plantation slavery. In recognizing the inherent biases of the historical record, archaeologists excavated the material remains that enslaved Africans and blacks left behind in order to write histories from “the bottom up.” The field has since expanded rapidly, as practitioners conduct excavations across the Americas and the Caribbean, with related studies on West African societies within the global context of the trans-Atlantic slave trade. With growth, the discipline has also diversified in terms of its questions, theoretical frameworks, lines of evidence, and political agendas. Students will first learn the basics of archaeology: how we conduct fieldwork, where we dig and why, and the various kinds of evidence we work with. The readings, lectures, etc, that follow will introduce students to how we use artifacts, architecture, the remains of plants and animals, and other evidence to interpret African diasporic societies and cultures in the past. The majority of the case studies will focus on African Americans (since most of this research takes place in the U.S.), although we will cover Canada, Brazil, Jamaica, the Bahamas, and research in other nations. Some of the major topics we’ll consider include: - the role that the material world plays in identity formation and inequality, especially with respect to race, gender and class. - the ways in which landscapes serve to naturalize power relations, and how African-descended peoples have used them as sites of resistance - Black cultural production from slavery through emancipation and beyond - Post-emancipation Black consumer practices, and social and economic mobility - the politics of the past, and the role of heritage preservation and archaeology in contemporary life


ANT 310L • Aztecs And Spaniards

31615 • Rodriguez, Enrique
Meets MWF 10:00AM-11:00AM SAC 4.174
(also listed as LAS 315)
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ANT 310L • Black Queer Art Worlds

31610 • Gill, Lyndon
Meets TTH 5:00PM-6:30PM PAR 206
(also listed as AFR 317E, WGS 301)
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Exploration of over two decades of work produced by and about black queer subjects throughout the circum-Atlantic world. Provides an introduction to various artists and intellectuals of the black queer diaspora, as well as an examination of the viability of black queer aesthetic practice as a form of theorizing.


ANT 310L • Intro To Jewish Latin America

31600 • Weinreb, Amelia
Meets TTH 11:00AM-12:30PM GDC 2.410
(also listed as J S 311, LAS 315, R S 313)
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Course Description

What can we learn about Latin American social worlds when we look at the place of Jews within it? Conversely, what we learn about Jewish social worlds when they unfold in Latin America? This course examines both of these questions. Specifically, we consider the role of Latin America as both a refuge from and a source of anti-Semitism, a hub of immigration, a site of Zionism, and of Jewish success and philanthropy. We also address themes of displacement, longing, belonging, marginalization, prejudice, immigration, community, cultural continuity, and memory, while considering Sephardi and Ashkenazi difference, and inter-generational conflict among Jewish Latin Americans. Overall, through reading, writing exercises, independent research and in-class films, the course is designed to provide students with an understanding of how Jews constructed individual lives and vibrant communities in predominantly Hispanic, Catholic countries of Latin America.

With these themes in mind, the course is divided into four units: 1) Historical literacy is a substantive introductory unit, which provides basic context from 1492 until the post-World War II period; 2) Jewish group identities in Latin American features readings on Jewish life and cultural forms in select national contexts (e.g. Argentina, Brazil, Mexico, Dominican Republic and others); 3) Memoir and personal narrative engages students in critical reading of creative non-fiction and ethnography that focuses on individual lives; 4) Contemporary realities explores current events, contemporary trends and popular culture in Jewish Latin America. Finally, over the course of the semester, drawing on course motifs, students will produce their own research papers addressing a specific research question in the Latin American national context of their choice.

Core Readings

  • The Other 1492: Jewish Settlement in the New World by Norman H. Finkelstein (iUniverse 2001)
  • The Jews of Latin America by Judith Laikin Elkin (Scholarly Publishing Office, University of Michigan Library 2011)
  • Pomegranate Seeds: Latin American Jewish Tales by Nadia Grosser Nagarajan (University of New Mexico Press 2005)
  • Kosher Feijoada and Other Paradoxes of Jewish Life in São Pauloby Misha Klein (University Press of Florida, 2012)

Grading Scheme

  • 2 Tests (25% each)
  • Final Paper (30%)
  • Participation (10%)
  • Discussion Leadership (5%)
  • 1 Reading Response Memo (5%)

ANT 310L • Introduction To South Asia

31605 • Maes, Claire
Meets MW 2:30PM-4:00PM PAR 306
(also listed as ANS 302K)
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ANT 320L • Amer Indian Langs And Culs

31620 • Webster, Anthony
(also listed as LIN 373)
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This course explores the myriad of indigenous languages (variously conceived) of the North America and how they are intertwined with culture. The focus of this course is from the perspectives of linguistic anthropology and an ethnography of speaking. That is, the indigenous languages of the Americas will be considered with respect to their phonologies, complex morphologies, discursive structures, and historical relations as well as their place within the sociocultural milieu of speakers. Focus will be on issues concerning literacy, language change, language shift, speech play, language and gender, verbal art, language ideologies and the quotidian ways of getting things done in and through language.  Language is made real in use. We will look to the uses and users of language.


ANT 322M • Mexican Immigratn Cul Hist

31622 • Menchaca, Martha
Meets MWF 11:00AM-12:00PM SAC 4.174
(also listed as LAS 324L, MAS 374)
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This course seeks to develop a student's understanding of the history of Mexican

immigration to the U.S. It will provide an overview of migratory patterns dating

back to the late pre-historic period through contemporary times. The focus of the

course, however, will be current immigration issues dealing with: 1) causes of

Mexican immigration: globalization, Mexican politics, agribusiness, 2) U.S. Law,

3) incorporation, and 4) citizenship.


ANT 324C • Science/Magic/Religion

31625 • Crosson, Jonathan
Meets TTH 3:30PM-5:00PM UTC 1.130
(also listed as AFR 372G, AMS 327, R S 373L)
show description

Description: 

In this course, we will interrogate the concepts of magic, science, and religion as culturally and historically constructed categories.  We will critically examine how the construction of science and religion, as well as the opposition of empirical knowledge and belief, were central to both the Enlightenment and the formation of the social and natural sciences.  Drawing on recent critiques of these foundational distinctions, we will question common-sense understandings of these categories and their relations, exploring the following questions:

  • How did the experimental sciences emerge out practices of “natural magic” or evidence law?
  • How do our notions of religion and science reflect certain assumptions?  What are other ways of categorizing practices we might deem as religion or science?
  • How have the divisions between science, magic and religion, or between rationality and superstition, undergirded projects of modernity, colonization, and development?

 

Texts:

  • Danny Burton and David Grandy.  Magic, Mystery, and Science.
  • George Saliba.  Islamic Science and the Making of the European Renaissance.
  • Helen Verran.  Science and an African Logic.
  • Karol Weaver.  Medical Revolutionaries:  The Enslaved Healers of Eighteenth Century Saint Domingue.
  • Harry West.  Ethnographic Sorcery.

 

Grading:

  • Eight Reading Quizzes (35%)
  • Topic, Research Question, and Thesis Statement (5%)
  • Revised Thesis Statement + Draft of Introduction + Outline of Paper (10 %)
  • Final Paper (30%)
  • Participation in Class Discussions (10%)
  • Oral Presentation (10%)

ANT 324L • Archaeol Of Climate Change

31675 • Rosen, Arlene
Meets MW 1:00PM-2:30PM PAR 1
(also listed as GRG 356)
show description

Climate change has impacted human societies over the course of human

existence on the planet. It has played a role in everything from hominin evolution to the rise and

fall of civilizations through to the present day economic and ethical decision-making. In this

course we will examine why climate changes, the methods for recording climate change, and

discuss case studies of the varied responses of past human societies to climate change in different

geographic regions and time periods with varying socio-political and economic systems. We will

explore aspects of resilience and rigidity of societies and issues of environmental sustainability

in the past as well as the present. Finally we will compare and contrast modern responses to

climate change on a global scale with those of past societies.

Goals: To familiarize students with the evidence for climate change and methods of climate

change research; to increase their understanding of the social, economic and technological issues

human societies faced in the past when dealing with climate change. To understand what were

adaptive and maladaptive human strategies. To help students evaluate the modern politics and

social responses to climate change. On successful completion of this course a student should

understand how climate change is recorded and the basic climatic record for the period of human

occupation of the earth. To be familiar with current debates about how human societies adapt to

climate change. To be able to think critically about issues and arguments proposed in the

literature, and to write a coherent essay arguing a point of view.


ANT 324L • Bronze/Iron Age Atlntc Eur

31685 • Wade, Maria
Meets TTH 9:30AM-11:00AM SAC 4.174
show description

This course aims to cross ideological, disciplinary, theoretical, and methodological boundaries between Bronze Age/Iron Age studies in Europe and explore varied approaches in the understanding of these two major archaeological periods from a transnational perspective. Although we will consider Eastern and Central Europe, there will be some focus on Western Europe as this area has often been neglected. 


ANT 324L • Development And Its Critics

31654 • Hindman, Heather
Meets TTH 5:00PM-6:30PM RLP 0.122
(also listed as ANS 361)
show description

Please check back for updates.


ANT 324L • Devlpment/Security/Society

31690 • Cons, Jason
Meets TTH 12:30PM-2:00PM RLP 0.112
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Explores the linkages between development, security, and, society. Examines a series of recent transformations that have drawn the relationship between international development and various forms of security together. Through an exploration of recent anthropological work, examines subjects such as: human security, the relationship between development and humanitarian intervention, strategies for planning in the face of climate change, disaster management, and new technologies of warfare and security.


ANT 324L • Digital Dat Sys In Archaeol

31680 • Jarvis, Jonathan
Meets W 3:00PM-6:00PM T5D 1.102
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This course provides the basic knowledge and skilss needed to operate digital equipment (e.g. GPS and Total Data Stations) commonly used for collecting location data on archaeological sites.  Classroom instruction on mapping and grid systems will be translated into "hands-on" instrument operation in simulated archaeological field conditions.  An introduction to GIS software and its applications in archaeology will be provided.  Data collected during simulated field operations will be processed and mapped using GIS software.  An overview of near-surface sensing techniques, including a field demonstration with a magnetometer, will be included.

 


ANT 324L • Ethnographic Writing

31670 • Stewart, Kathleen
Meets TH 3:00PM-6:00PM SAC 5.118
show description

This is a writing workshop. We will read one another's writing, proceeding through a series of exercises to add density and texture to ethnographic description by including attention to scene, character, event, situations, dialogue, etc. Why does writing matter in ehtnography? Hoe do forms of writing change cultural theory? What questions do forms of writing raise about subjects and objects, forms of attention, the possibility of thinking through description? 

This is a writing component class. there will be assignments to write different kinds of essays (autobiographical, descriptive, analytical) and to work through drafts.


ANT 324L • Global Mrkts & Local Culs

31665 • Hindman, Heather
Meets TTH 2:00PM-3:30PM GAR 2.112
(also listed as ANS 361)
show description

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ANT 324L • Globalization In Latin Amer

31630 • Canova, Paola
Meets TTH 11:00AM-12:30PM SAC 5.118
(also listed as LAS 324L)
show description

This course critically examines the ‘globalization’ phenomenon. What is its genealogy? How do we conceptualize it? What are its main debates? The course takes a historical and ethnographic approach to trace flows of capital, as well as encounters and negotiations that constitute our contemporary global connections. Students will be exposed to the ways in which globalization is experienced in Latin America and how it reorganizes relations at all levels. Particular attention will be given to the economic, political, cultural and ecological dimensions of globalization. These themes will be explored though theoretical works and case studies related to labor, the State, development politics, intimacy, sexualities, nature, consumption, immigration, media, and health.


ANT 324L • Intro Ethnograph Method

31634 • Jones, Omi
Meets W 2:00PM-5:00PM GWB 1.138
(also listed as AFR 372E)
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ANT 324L • Maya Art And Architecture-Gua

31635 • Stuart, David
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ANT 324L • Nature, Society, & Adaptatn

31655 • Knapp, Gregory
Meets TTH 11:00AM-12:30PM RLP 0.108
(also listed as GRG 331K)
show description

This course examines the very long-term human trajectory in gaining control over resources, impacting the environment, and transforming planet earth into a meaningful human home. This trajectory has been related to long-term changes in human integration (reciprocity, trade, and redistribution) at a variety of scales, culminating in recent globalization. These changes have been associated with great achievements in quality of life for some, but with attendant problems of violence, impoverishment, and environmental impacts including, in some extreme cases, collapse.  These challenges implicate both culture (learned habitual behavior, concepts, and associated objects and landscapes) and ethics (socialy oriented decisions) as they promote or fail to promote resilience and adaptation with respect for human rights.


ANT 324L • Science And Art In Archaeology

31639 • Valdez, Fred
Meets M 3:00PM-6:00PM SAC 4.120
show description

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ANT 324L • Shamanism & The Primitive

31645 • Roberts, Jason
Meets MW 2:30PM-4:00PM RLP 0.118
(also listed as ANS 340, R S 352, REE 345)
show description

All over the world, we find people who are called (and who call themselves) “shamans.” But what does the term really tell us about the people to whom it is applied? The word itself probably originates from the Tungusic Evenki language of North Asia, and may have already been in use for more than a millennium when it was introduced to the West after Russian forces conquered the shamanistic Khanate of Kazan in 1552. Yet in anthropology and the study of religion – let alone in popular culture – the use of the word “shaman” extends well beyond the Tungusic Siberian context from which it was borrowed. It has assumed the form and function of a universal category even as it has come to refer to people whose beliefs, practices, and even appearances are wildly varied. So, what makes a shaman a shaman? And what, moreover, is “shamanism?” This upper division course uses anthropological as well as historical literature focusing on shamans and shamanism in Central Asia to examine such beliefs and practices as three-worlds symbolism, divination, spirit helpers, drumming, chanting, dancing, hallucinogens, trance, and soul retrieval. However, it also examines the ways in which various theories of shamanism constitute and appropriate the exotic in a variety of broadly construed religious settings – the ways in which westerners, from missionaries to social scientists, have viewed the beliefs and practices of the shaman as an “ism” analogous to a religion even when that is not necessarily the case. Students of this course will learn to identify the major theories of “shamanism” along with the inherent biases of those theories in order to better read accounts of shamans and “shamanism” (from historical to modern, anthropological to popular) against the grain and discern when collected data reveals as much about the observers as it does about the shamans they observe.


ANT 324L • Sonic Ethnography

31650 • Peterson, Marina
Meets TTH 12:30PM-2:00PM SAC 4.118
show description

Sonic ethnography starts with listening, and listening to how people listen. Listening is a practice that people do already as a way of knowing about things; it is something in which we are all expert, but not often acknowledged. Thus sonic ethnography addresses ways in which people orient themselves via the aural, how expertise is enacted through listening, and how attachments of kinship and friendship cohere around an attunement to sounds. Emphasizing an anthropological approach to sound, the course engages themes of listening, noise, silence, audio technology, vibration, and voice through readings, class fieldtrips, guest lectures, and research. Students will learn research methods in sonic ethnography, create field recordings, and explore diverse ways of writing sound. 


ANT 325J • The Photographic Image

31698 • Campbell, Craig
Meets T 2:00PM-4:00PM SAC 4.120
show description

"The Photographic Image" applies concepts and practices from visual ethnography to the study of memory, place, and everyday life. The course aims at developing counter-intuitive and subversive approaches to practices of looking and techniques of representation. Whereas photographs are often taken to be static representations of the world, we will invert this idea and explore how images can be transient and ephemeral by focusing not only on how to produce images but how they are 'read' by others.

 

The class is planned around multiple photo-based projects. You will be required to read for these projects and undertake original photography assignments. At all points in the course students are drawn into the use of image-making as an interpretive and critical engagement with course readings. We will begin with techniques of visual inquiry established by visual anthropologists, documentarians, and artists working on the margins of documentary traditions. Students are expected to engage fully in both individual and group activities. Students are expected to have at their disposal a camera (digital or analogue).


ANT 325L • Cultrl Heritage On Display

31705 • Seriff, Suzanne
Meets MWF 10:00AM-11:00AM SAC 4.118
(also listed as AMS 321)
show description

This course is designed to take you behind the scenes in the public construction,

negotiation, and display of “traditional American culture” by focusing on a number of

cultural heritage sites in the public sphere. In particular, the course will examine the

political economy of fairs, festivals, theme parks, history sites, and museum exhibitions

as contested sites of heritage production in American history—focusing especially on

those moments when an almost crusade-like obsession with defining and displaying the

“true American” becomes an active agent in the process of nation building and

ideological construction. We will focus closely on the histories and agencies of specific

“exhibitionary complexes,” paying close attention to what one critic calls ‘the

problematic relationship of their objects to the instruments of their display.” (Barbara

Kirshenblatt-Gimblett). Each student will have the opportunity to participate directly in

creating and/or critiquing the process of cultural heritage production, documentation, and

display—including conducting original field research, planning and designing a specific

mode of display, or providing a critical analysis of an historic example of cultural

heritage production.

 


ANT 325L • Cultures Of Sustainability

31710 • Hartigan, John
Meets TTH 11:00AM-12:30PM SAC 4.118
show description

This course guides students in recognizing how ecological concerns are articulated and perceived in different cultural contexts. Environmentalists in the U.S. and Europe often face challenges both in convincing peoples around the world to participate in conservation projects and in recognizing local, situated (particularly indigenous) forms of caring about ecological health and social equity. Notions of “nature” are fundamentally culture-bound, entangled with concepts of personhood and agency, power and risk, and cosmological orderings of humans and nonhumans. Beginning with an explanation of culture and its dynamics, this course will survey ecological activities in a range of settings (China, Indonesia, Brazil, and Europe), providing students a comparative framework for recognizing the criteria mobilized as people assess whether or how their environments are in peril. The analytical foundation is anthropological, emphasizing biocultural perspectives and recent work in cultural ecology, but the course will encourage interdisciplinary formulations of student research projects. Some of our case-studies will draw from science and technology studies, and students will be assisted in developing proposals that tap and mobilize various forms of expertise and knowledge claims. We will also spend time considering disciplinary debates over the Anthropocene (how to understand its dimensions and consequences) and sampling the exciting new development of “multispecies ethnography” (projects that analyze nonhumans’ roles in social and political formations).  


ANT 325L • Multicultural Israel

31700 • Weinreb, Amelia
Meets TTH 12:30PM-2:00PM RLM 5.116
(also listed as J S 365, MES 341)
show description

Course Description
Israel has the highest proportion of migrants of any country in the world. The notion of absorption—the social and economic integration of Jewish immigrants—has remained an explicit ideal since the founding of the modern state of Israel in 1948. Yet, absorption is also an ideological tool that often runs counter to the contemporary lived experience of citizenship, participation, nation building, minority rights, and the conflicting interests of today’s multicultural publics. Taking these tensions as a starting point, this course explores the complex social fabric that comprises contemporary Israeli society, and that shapes Israeli identity, practice and politics. We will focus on the lived experience of Israel’s increasingly diverse population. This includes populations associated with the majority: veteran Ashkenazim and Mizrahim; more recent Jewish immigrants from the former Soviet Union, Ethiopia, Latin America and France; religious communities such Haredim and modern-Orthodox. It also includes ethnic and religious minorities such as Arab-Israelis/Palestinians, Bedouins, Christians, Muslims, Druze, and Black Hebrews, as well as laborers from all over the globe who migrate to Israel and refugees from Sudan and Eritrea. How fluid are boundaries between these groups? How different are their interests, tastes, desires and needs? How committed are various publics to a coherent nation-building project and to contemporary Zionism? To explore the breadth of multicultural Israel without sacrificing cultural specificity and theoretical depth, the course is organized into three integrated units: a) historical background of Israel and its populations; b) Israel’s citizen-state relationships, identity and belonging, and c) ethnographic case studies of Israel-specific multicultural issues, and general contemporary multicultural theory.

Core Readings

  • Jews in Israel: Contemporary Social and Cultural Patterns edited by Uzi Rebhun and Chaim Waxman (Brandeis University Press 2004).
  • Israel/Palestine (second edition) by Alan Dowdy (Polity Press 2008)
  • Being Israeli: The Dynamics of Multiple Citizenship by Gershon Shafir and Yoav Peled (Cambridge University Press 2002)
  • The Multicultural Challenge in Israel by Avi Sagi and Ohad Nachtomy (Academic Studies Press 2009).

Grading Scheme

  • Active, intellectually rigorous participation in seminar component: 10%
  • 2-page reading response papers (3 total, each one 3.3% of your grade): 10%
  • 2 in-class tests (25%, 25%): 50%
  • Annotated bibliography assignment: 30%

ANT 326E • Plains Archaeol: Prehist/Hist

31715 • Wade, Maria
Meets TTH 3:30PM-5:00PM SAC 4.174
show description

Life on the Plains has never been easy. The ecological characteristics of the Plains enabled varied human populations to adapt and change in response to environmental and historical circumstances. This course explores the evidence of human activities on the Great Plains, with a primary focus on the central and southern plains from prehistoric to historic times (ca. 11.000 BP to ca. AD 1850). We will review, critically, the principal environmental concepts used to define the plains, discuss the impact of specific resources such as the bison, and examine a number of archaeological sites as well as some relevant historical records. 


ANT 330C • Theories Of Culture & Society

31720 • Cons, Jason
Meets TTH 9:30AM-11:00AM SAC 4.118
show description

The purpose of this course is to introduce students to a set of core ideas and propositions in social

theory broadly and theories of culture and society specifically. The course aims to do this by teaching

strategies for thinking with and against, writing about, using, and engaging theoretical texts. The course

works forward from the mid-19th century, engaging a highly selective set of thinkers who provide core

foundations in contemporary social and anthropological thought. It then moves into a series of

explorations of the ways that anthropological theories of culture and society written in the early and

mid-twentieth century continue to fuel debates in anthropology today. It closes with a brief

introduction to a series of transformations in social and cultural theory from the 1970s forward,

particularly postcolonial theory and post-structuralism. The course makes no claim to be

comprehensive. Rather, it aims to teach students how to work with and through social theory and to

prepare them for further encounters with social theory in academic work and in the “world beyond.”

The course is conceived primarily for majors but above all for students who are committed to working

with difficult, influential, and fascinating texts. The course combines lecture and seminar discussion. The

course integrates an intense and demanding regime of reading and discussion with an equally intense

and demanding program of writing. The aim is to encourage students to develop the habit of writing

clear and concise prose, especially when engaging with difficult and complex ideas.


ANT 346L • Primate Social Behavior

31724 • Lewis, Rebecca
Meets MWF 3:00PM-4:00PM GDC 2.410
show description

This course focuses on the study of primate social behavior. It explores the basic theoretical principles that guide primatologists.

Topics covered include: evolutionary theory, primate diversity, social and mating systems, sexual selection, life history, cooperation, competition, intelligence, communication, and human behavior.


ANT 347C • Methods In Primate Biology

31725 • Sandel, Aaron
Meets M 1:00PM-2:00PM SAC 4.120
show description

Do you want to be the next Jane Goodall? This is the course for you.

 

Course Description

This course focuses on the study of primate behavior and the methods by which animal behavior is observed and documented. You will learn how to formulate hypotheses and predictions, devise research projects designed to test these predictions, collect data, and write comprehensive scientific research reports describing your results. You will gain familiarity with some widely-used technologies that facilitate wildlife studies (social network analysis, GPS mapping, visualization of spatial data).

Working around a specific research question, individual students will design their own behavioral study, develop and implement a sampling protocol, and collect their own primary data, which they will then analyze and discuss. The final project for this course will involve (1) a presentation to your peers in a conference environment, and (2) a written, comprehensive scientific report.

 

Flags: Writing; Quantitative Reasoning (pending); Independent Inquiry (pending)

 

Canvas Site


ANT 348 • Human Origins And Evolution

31726-31728 • Kappelman, John
Meets MW 9:00AM-10:00AM SAC 5.172
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This course examines the evidence for the origin and evolution of humans with particular emphasis placed on reconstructing the paleobiology of extinct hominins.  Lectures will draw upon a diverse range of disciplines (anatomy, archaeology, ecology, ethology, genetics, geology, paleontology) and integrate these into a framework for understanding the origin and evolutionary history of this unusual group of primates.  Weekly laboratories provide the student with an opportunity to examine firsthand the fossil evidence for human evolution.


ANT 348K • Comparatve Primate Devlpmnt

31723 • Sandel, Aaron
Meets MW 10:00AM-11:30AM JES A217A
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What does it mean to be an adult? In the United States, this has become a pressing issue as many young adults seem to be stuck in adolescence. Now there are self help books for parents, including “Getting to 30: A Parent's Guide to the 20-Something Years.” But humans are not the only animal to take a long time to grow up. Primates, especially apes, exhibit long periods of immaturity. This course will discuss primate development, focusing on biological and social definitions of adolescence and adulthood. How has natural selection shaped human and primate development?

The focus of this course will be on “life history theory,” which pertains to the traits related to growth and reproduction, life and death. At what age and size do animals start reproducing? How many offspring do different species tend to have at one time? Why do primates, compared to other mammals, tend to live long and reproduce slowly? How is energy devoted to growth vs. reproduction over the course of individual’s life?

Through lecture and close readings of scientific articles, students will learn about parent-offspring conflict, mating strategies, mammalian patterns of growth, and the methods use to study growth and development. We will grapple with some questions that are difficult to answer. What is adulthood, what are the adaptive reasons for delaying it, and why is it sometimes so hard to “adult”?

It's sort of like Richard Linklater's Boyhood meets Disney's Chimpanzee.


ANT 348K • Sex And Human Nature

31729 • Veilleux, Carrie
Meets MWF 12:00PM-1:00PM BUR 216
(also listed as BIO 337, WGS 323)
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I. Course Description and Rationale

This class provides an introduction to the SCIENTIFIC study of sexual behavior, mate choice, and reproduction in humans from the perspectives of evolutionary and comparative biology. In this course, we will examine a wide range of genetic, ecological, social, physiological, and behavioral aspects of human and nonhuman primate sexuality. Starting from basic principles of evolutionary theory, we consider a diverse range of basic questions about sex and sexuality: How is sex determined? Why did sexual reproduction evolve? How are males and females different biologically? What determines sexual orientation? We also look at the role of ecology and social life in shaping human mating patterns using a variety of ethnographic and cross- cultural materials. Do men and women differ in their sexual strategies and, if so, how and why? Why do people marry and form long-term pair-bonds? Why do we experience sexual jealousy? Finally, topics relevant to contemporary human sexuality will be also discussed, including rape, contraception, and the influence of sexually transmitted diseases on human evolution. Throughout, examples will be drawn primarily from traditional and modern human societies as well as from studies of our nonhuman primate relatives.

This course fits into the Department’s broader curriculum in biological anthropology by considering human sexual behavior in the context of comparative primate sexuality and reproduction and in demonstrating how evolutionary approaches can be used to make sense of the sexual behavior, mating patterns, and reproductive biology of the human species. It fits into the general anthropology curriculum in addressing important issues about human gender and sexuality from a combined biological and cultural perspective.

II. Course Aims and Objectives

Aims

The purpose of this course it to give students a solid foundation in evolutionary biology and adaptationist thinking as it is used in the anthropological sciences, with a specific focus on understanding aspects of human sexual anatomy, reproductive biology, sexual behavior, and cultural practices.

Specific Learning Objectives

When you have completed the course, you should be able to:

  • Summarize different adaptationist/evolutionary approaches to thinking about human

    behavioral biology (e.g., evolutionary psychology, human behavioral ecology) and

    distinguish among such approaches

  • Describe the fundamentals of human and mammalian sex determination systems,

    including the physiological and genetic underpinnings of sexual differentiation

  • Describe the physiological and endocrine processes involved in female reproductive

    cycling and in male spermatogenesis and how these change over the lifespan

  • Describe and contrast different hypotheses for the evolution of sexual reproduction

  • Discuss how human sexual anatomy, behavior, and mating practices are similar to and

    differ from those of other primates and other mammals

  • Understand the comparative method and how it can applied to answer evolutionary

questions

–2–

  • Articulate evolutionary hypothesis for a given pattern of human sexual behavior (e.g., mate choice) and design and critique tests of that hypotheses using logic and evidence

  • Read and critique research from the primary literature on human sexuality, including evaluating the strengths and weaknesses in the researchers methodology and interpretation

    III. Format and Procedures

    The course will be divided into four sections, each of which will involve a combination of lecture material and discussion/recitation during normal class time, both in small groups and as a class as a whole. In addition, students are expect to participate in and online collaborative project (the Sex and Human Nature weblog, see below). The following is an overview of the major topics we will cover in each part of the course:

    Part I – Principles of Evolutionary Biology

• Approaches to the scientific study of human sexuality and sexual behavior. Levels of explanation in evolutionary biology. Fundamentals of evolutionary theory. The evolution of sexual reproduction.

Part II – Natural History of Sex: A Comparative Perspective

• Sex determination processes in animals. The role of sex hormones in sexual differentiation. Male and female reproductive anatomy and physiology. The physiology of sexual intercourse. Orgasm and its significance. Human sexuality in comparative perspective.

Part III – The Mating Game: Strategies of Human Mate Choice and Retention

  • Sexual selection theory: Evolution and biological basis of sex differences in mating strategies, mate choice and attraction.

  • Intrasexual competition, woman’s “extended” sexuality, and sperm competition. Human marriage and mating systems in cross-cultural perspective. Mate guarding, mate retention, and the role of sexual jealousy. Biocultural perspective on control of sexuality

  • Sexual orientation: Biological bases and cross-cultural overview.

    Part IV – Sex in Our Lives

• Changes across the lifespan in human sexuality. Contraception and sexually transmitted disease and their evolutionary consequences. Sexual coercion: Unwanted attention, harassment, and rape. The future of human reproduction.


ANT 349C • Human Variation

31730-31740 • Miro-Herrans, Aida
Meets MW 3:00PM-4:00PM RLP 0.112
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This course surveys the patterns of biological variation within and between human populations.  We will examine physical, genetic, and behavioral traits, and consider both the microevolutionary and cultural processes that influence those traits.  We will also discuss how studies of human variation have impacted society in the past and present.  Topics include:  an overview of the principles of genetics and evolution, race, sex differences, human variability in behavior, eugenics and contemporary genetic issues, human plasticity, and disease.


ANT 350C • Primate Sensory Ecology

31745 • Kirk, Edward
Meets TTH 9:30AM-11:00AM SAC 5.172
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Primate Sensory Ecology is a course designed for advanced undergraduates in physical anthropology and the biological sciences. This course provides an opportunity for detailed study of primate sensory systems from an ecological and comparative phylogenetic perspective.
    The core topics covered in this course are the special senses of hearing, vision, and smell, with a special emphasis on the adaptive and ecological significance of sensory adaptations in primates. For each of these senses, lectures and readings will provide a comprehensive review of the following concepts: 1) general anatomy and physiology, 2) development and genetic regulation, 3) functional morphology and mechanics, 4) neural control and regulation, 5) psychophysics, 6) biological role and behavioral ecology, 7) phylogenetic history and fossil record. Additional senses that will be covered in a less-comprehensive fashion include touch, taste, balance and equilibrium, and the Jacobson's organ.
In studying each sensory system, a strong emphasis will be placed on understanding the relationship between variant morphologies and behavioral capabilities. This dual focus on morphology and behavioral ecology will provide students with an explicit understanding of the effect that the  functional design of a sensory system has on an organism's adaptive niche. All information will be presented within a comparative phylogenetic framework, so that evolutionary novelties (e.g., the haplorhine retinal fovea) can be understood in terms of the macroevolutionary processes responsible for the novel feature's appearance. This approach will further emphasize the importance of certain evolutionary changes in primate sensory systems as key innovations. Toward this end, discussions of current literature will cover a number of special topics in addition to the more basic aspects of sensory system morphology and function.


ANT 351E • Primate Evolution

31750 • Shapiro, Liza
Meets TTH 11:00AM-12:30PM SAC 5.172
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This course is an examination of the fossil record for (nonhuman) primate evolution.  The fossil record will be examined after a basic grounding in the anatomy, ecology, and systematics of living primates.  Each of the major radiations of fossil primates will be explored with respect to adaptive diversity, functional morphology, and systematics.


ANT 366 • Anat And Bio Of Human Skeleton

31755 • Kirk, Edward
Meets TTH 12:30PM-1:00PM SAC 5.172
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This course introduces the student to an in-depth study of the human skeleton. Class sessions combine lecture and laboratory sessions and cover topics including developmental biology, functional morphology, and skeletal identification, with a special focus on the latter skill as it relates to forensics and archaeological studies. Students will also be introduced to new 3D imaging techniques for studying the skeleton. 

This class requires both intensive in-class and out-of-class preparation. Participants must be prepared to handle actual human osteological specimens and have a professional approach to this subject and the human remains. An interest in human skeletal identification is especially applicable to the fields of archeology, physical anthropology, health sciences, law, and law enforcement.


ANT 366 • Anat/Bio Human Skeleton-Wb

31760 • Kappelman, John
show description

This course introduces the student to an in-depth study of the human skeleton. Class sessions combine lecture and laboratory sessions and cover topics including developmental biology, functional morphology, and skeletal identification, with a special focus on the latter skill as it relates to forensics and archaeological studies. Students will also be introduced to new 3D imaging techniques for studying the skeleton. 

This class requires both intensive in-class and out-of-class preparation. Participants must be prepared to handle actual human osteological specimens and have a professional approach to this subject and the human remains. An interest in human skeletal identification is especially applicable to the fields of archeology, physical anthropology, health sciences, law, and law enforcement.


ANT 380K • Anthropocene In The Longue Dur

31785 • Rosen, Arlene
Meets M 3:00PM-6:00PM SAC 5.118
(also listed as GRG 396T)
show description

ANT 380K and GRG 396T

Anthropocene in the Longue Durée

This seminar explores the “Anthropocene” from the perspectives of multiple disciplines, its historical roots, and its chronologies.  Two professors lead this seminar and will be part of all meetings.  One, Arlene Rosen, is an environmental archaeologist who has worked all over the planet and directs the environmental archaeology lab.  The other, Tim Beach, is a soils geoscientist who has worked mainly in Central America and the Mediterranean and directs the Soils and Geoarchaeology Lab.  They bring perspectives from the natural sciences, social sciences, and humanities. 
 
From Plato to Alexander von Humboldt to John Muir and Rachel Carson, thinkers have long written about the metamorphosis of the Earth wrought by humans at multiple spatial and temporal scales. Only with Stoermer and Crutzen in the Early 2000s did the final term Anthropocene come to the fore. Many disciplines offer perspectives on this topic, including archaeology, ecology, climatology, geomorphology and paleontology, as well as the social sciences and humanities. Moreover, human impacts have been substantial for millennia, though “the great acceleration” since the 1950s has certainly lived up to its name. From our 21st century vantage point, now squarely in the “Anthropocene”, we need to muster all of these tools and technologies and innovate more to understand and manage our present and future, increasingly human-dominated world.
 
Topics
 
History of the concept and nature of Epochs
The Great Levers of Change
Human Drivers of Change
Markers and Golden Spikes
Who owns the narrative?
When does the Anthropocene begin? Late Pleistocene or the Holocene and its new subdivisions: The Greenlandian, Northgrippian, and Meghalayan
Early Anthropocene
15,000 BP
5,000 BP
1610
16 July 1945
1950
Geographic dimensions of intensive human impacts
The Anthropocene in Ecology: biodiversity, ecosystem services . . .
The Anthropocene in the soils, oceans, atmosphere, geomorphology, and anthropology
Utopian Environments, The Chthulucene, The Capitalocene, & Terrascaping
The Anthropocene & Environmental Restoration 
The Great Acceleration

ANT 388 • Applied Data Analysis

31800 • Di Fiore, Anthony
Meets TTH 2:00PM-3:30PM SAC 5.112
show description

This course provides a hands-on, practical overview of methods and tools for applied data science (e.g., statistics, programming, and data management and visualization) for graduate students and senior undergraduates in the natural and social science disciplines. Students will learn to use the statistical programming software R as well as other useful software tools (e.g., shell scripts, text editors, databases, query languages, and version control systems) and will receive training in various data science workflows, including digital data acquisition and management, exploratory data analysis and visualization, and statistical analysis and interpretation. Topics to be covered include basic descriptive and inferential statistics, hypothesis testing, regression, and general linear modeling, as well as additional specific methods based on student interest (e.g., geospatial data analysis, phylogenetic comparative methods, social network analysis, corpus construction and text mining, population genetic/genomic analysis).

 


ANT 389K • Race And Ethncty In Amer Socty

31805 • Menchaca, Martha
Meets W 2:00PM-5:00PM SAC 5.118
(also listed as LAS 391, MAS 392)
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This course seeks to develop a student’s theoretical and historical understanding of race and ethnicity in the United States.  We will begin by examining the different historical processes of incorporation that led to economic inequalities between different ethnic/racial groups in the United States.  After examining the formation and incorporation of the American ethnic and racial structure we will review a broad spectrum of topics dealing with American culture and identity. Topics receiving particular attention include:  critical race theory, globalization/neoliberalism, Latino immigration, modern manifestations of racism, and education and social mobility .


ANT 391 • Anthropology Of East Asia

31809 • Oppenheim, Robert
Meets T 5:00PM-8:00PM RLP 0.124
(also listed as ANS 390)
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Anthropology of East Asia is a graduate level course designed both for anthropologists and for non-anthropologists interested in East Asia.  It has two primary goals.  The first is simply to consider contemporary topics, approaches, and frameworks in anthropologies focused on East Asia in a way useful to non-anthropologists and anthropologists alike; I group recent writings around a selection of major and minor themes.  The second is to forward a more explicit discussion of the complex intersections of theory, topic, and area focus.  Consider the following:

a) Anthropologists, often, define themselves by topic or approach, rather (or more than) the geographical area of their research.  E.g., in conversations at conferences, “I do development” often trumps “I do West Africa.”

 

b) Anthropologists of East Asia are sometimes exceptions to rule a.

 

Understanding this and its effects on the political economy of knowledge involves keeping in mind a host of tensions, overlapping histories, and divergent and convergent traditions.


ANT 391 • Indig Ppls Neolib And State

31815 • Canova, Paola
Meets T 2:00PM-5:00PM SAC 5.118
(also listed as LAS 391)
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This seminar examines theoretical and ethnographic approaches to understanding the

ways in which the neoliberal State is constructed and experienced in different

contemporary contexts. Challenging conceptualizations of the State as bounded and

homogenous we will critically engage key themes such as governmentality, bureaucracy,

welfare, sovereignty, multiculturalism, and citizenship to reflect on the multilayered and

oftentimes contradictory nature of the State. The course will provide students with

analytical tools to understand the State as a set of processes, discourses, practices and

representations embedded in unequal power dynamics that are in constant flux and that

respond to particular historical and cultural contexts. While readings will cover a

different range of case studies, particular attention will be given to the experiences of

indigenous peoples and the State in Latin America.


ANT 391 • Violence, Trauma, Memory

31825 • Smith, Christen
Meets TH 10:00AM-1:00PM SAC 4.120
(also listed as LAS 391)
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This course explores violence, trauma, and the politics of memory from an anthropological perspective. Through reading

ethnography and philosophical texts on violence, the course queries the ethics of writing about and researching violence and

trauma. Throughout the class we think through the question “what is violence?” as we discuss the concept’s physical,

structural and symbolic forms. Specific topics include war, the police state, colonialism, terror(ism), witnessing, representation,

surveillance, power and discourse, with special attention to the dynamics of gender, race, class and sexuality that complicate

these themes. We particularly focus on the politics of writing and theorizing violence when doing social analysis, the precarious

balance between addressing violence and glorifying it, and the coping mechanisms that we often require to do this work.

Objectives : 1) To think critically about violence not only as a physical encounter, but a multilayered phenomenon that

manifests itself in dynamic ways; 2) To consider the role anthropology plays in witnessing violence; 3) To better understand

the ethics of discussing and writing about violence ethnographically.


ANT 392J • Phys Anthro: Behav, Gen, Var

31830 • Lewis, Rebecca
Meets F 9:00AM-12:00PM SAC 5.124
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This course is Part 2 of a two semester core curriculum in biological anthropology. Part 1 is NOT a prerequisite, however. Topics covered will include grouping patterns, reproductive strategies and mating systems, socioecology, cooperation, sex differences in behavior, genomics, population genetics, and evolutionary genetic theory in relation to human and nonhuman primates. The course also explores biological variation in genetic, physical, and behavioral traits within and between populations of humans and nonhuman primates, exploring both microevolutionary and cultural processes that have shaped these traits. (Part 1 emphasizes the history of the field of biological anthropology, evolutionary theory, primate systematics, methods of phylogenetic reconstruction, primate diversity and anatomical adaptations, and the human and nonhuman primate fossil record). The course provides an overview of behavioral ecology, molecular anthropology, and biological variation in human and nonhuman primates. The goal of the course is to give students an overview of the field, while allowing students to identify potential areas of research to pursue at the master’s and doctoral levels.


ANT 392N • Intro To Grad Ling Anthropol

31835 • Keating, Elizabeth
Meets W 1:00PM-4:00PM RLP 3.106
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An Anthropology Core Course, this course is an introduction to the theoretical and methodological foundations of the study of language from a sociocultural perspective. Topics discussed include linguistic, philosophical, psychological, sociological and anthropological contributions to the understanding of verbal and non-verbal communication as a social activity embedded in cultural contexts. No prior training in linguistics is presupposed. Readings include both ethnographic studies and theoretical work about language.


ANT 392P • Intro To Cultural Forms

31840 • Hartigan, John
Meets M 1:00PM-4:00PM SAC 5.124
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Seminar Description: Today cultural analysis is being applied more widely than ever before, across varied domains—expressive, corporate, scientific, and social—that require different types of expertise and knowledge to properly comprehend. In this expansion of the scope of “cultural” as an explanatory framework, a focus on form provides a free-floating type of attention across a range of milieus and mediums. The analysis of form is as ancient as Greek philosophy (e.g. rhetoric) but as current as our interests in the latest technologies. This seminar surveys the variety of ways that an overarching interest in form is fueling interdisciplinary research, particularly in projects that track disparate cultural phenomenon across complex landscapes as they manifest in dense, multi-layered arrangements, often fusing financial, aesthetic, and political interests. We will examine the trend towards melding topic areas—such as “media ecology” or using “publics” with collectives of nonhuman life forms—to devise distinct ways of comprehending emergent cultural objects and activities. Media—as it references an array of substances, instruments, or channels—and mediation (in biotechnologies, communication infrastructures, legal practices, and market expansions) will serve as a basic point of orientation for seminar readings and discussion. Other examples of emergent phenomenon will be drawn from current work in science studies, post-human and biodiversity projects, and urban ecologies, which are each held together by an overriding attention to cultural forms of expression and exchange. The seminar will be divided into thirds: the first provides an overarching framework for an attention to form; the second examines a variety of forms (visual, sonic, urban, etc.); the final third focuses on applying these perspectives.

Seminar Dynamics: This initial stage of the seminar will feature a combination of lectures and readings: the first half of each session will primarily be lecture-oriented with a discussion following in the second half. Depending on the pace of discussions we can shift away from lectures entirely as we progress through the semester. A key objective is for participants to apply these analytical approaches, either in relation to their specific areas of research or in a more general manner. The mechanism for doing this will be a series of short, informal essays (3 or 4) in which participants develop sketches of objects, settings, or dynamics via an attention to cultural form.


ANT 392S • Intro Graduate Feminist Anthro

31845 • Strong, Pauline
Meets T 10:00AM-1:00PM SAC 5124
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This seminar considers the history and contemporary practice of feminist anthropology. After a survey of the impact of first, second, and third wave feminism within anthropology, we will turn to contemporary topics including feminism and science; feminist methodologies; culture and biology; sex, sexuality and gender; the anthropology of reproduction; and the anthropology of power. This seminar considers perspectives from several subdisciplines in Anthropology, and fulfills a core course requirement for Anthropology graduate students.


ANT 394M • Object Lessons

31855 • Stewart, Kathleen
Meets M 9:00AM-12:00PM SAC 5.118
show description