Department of Anthropology

ANT 301 • Biological Anthropology

31625-31680 • Lewis, Rebecca
Meets MW 9:00AM-10:00AM JES A121A
N1
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This course is an introduction to the principles and the methods of biological anthropology, the study of human beings from a biological perspective.  It is a field that seeks to explain our relationship to other primates and to the rest of the natural world.  In other words: Who are we? How are we unique? How, why, and when did we come to be the way that we are? The study of biological anthropology requires many different types of knowledge.  Throughout the course, we will examine anatomical, behavioral, and genetic similarities and differences among the living primates, learn the basic mechanisms of evolution, and trace the path of human evolution as reconstructed from the fossil record.  The main goal of the course is to obtain a clear understanding of our place in nature.


ANT 301 • Biological Anthropology-Wb

31690 • Kappelman, John • Internet; Asynchronous
N1
show description

This course is an introduction to the principles and the methods of biological anthropology, the study of human beings from a biological perspective.  It is a field that seeks to explain our relationship to other primates and to the rest of the natural world.  In other words: Who are we? How are we unique? How, why, and when did we come to be the way that we are? The study of biological anthropology requires many different types of knowledge.  Throughout the course, we will examine anatomical, behavioral, and genetic similarities and differences among the living primates, learn the basic mechanisms of evolution, and trace the path of human evolution as reconstructed from the fossil record.  The main goal of the course is to obtain a clear understanding of our place in nature.


ANT 302 • Cultural Anthropology

31695-31740 • Seriff, Suzanne
Meets MW 10:00AM-11:00AM ART 1.102
GC SB
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This course focuses on "classic" themes in anthropology such as ethnicity, language, adaptation, marriage, kinship, gender, religion, and social stratification.  We will consider anthropological theory from its 19th-century origins to the present.  The course also explores the nature of ethnographic field work, especially the relationship between the anthropologist and the field community.  
The lectures, readings, and films for this course have been selected with the objective of exploring the social meanings with which diverse groups invest their life.  By comparing and analyzing the similarities and differences between "us" and "others," both within the borders of the U.S. and abroad, the anthropological perspective can expose some of our own cultural assumptions and enable us to better understand diverse cultures.


ANT 302 • Cultural Anthropology-Wb

31764 • Sturm, Circe • Internet; Asynchronous
CDGC SB
show description

This course focuses on "classic" themes in anthropology such as ethnicity, language, adaptation, marriage, kinship, gender, religion, and social stratification.  We will consider anthropological theory from its 19th-century origins to the present.  The course also explores the nature of ethnographic field work, especially the relationship between the anthropologist and the field community.  
The lectures, readings, and films for this course have been selected with the objective of exploring the social meanings with which diverse groups invest their life.  By comparing and analyzing the similarities and differences between "us" and "others," both within the borders of the U.S. and abroad, the anthropological perspective can expose some of our own cultural assumptions and enable us to better understand diverse cultures.


ANT 304 • Intro Archaeol Stds: Prehist

31765-31790 • Covey, Ronald
Meets MW 11:00AM-12:00PM BEL 328
GC N1
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An introduction to archaeology as a discipline.  Three major themes that deal with issues of the past will be covered:

1.  A brief history of the discipline, changing theories about various aspects of the past, and the role that the reconstructions of the past play in national and/or group identities.

2.  A survey of the development of human culture from its beginnings to the rise of civilizations and proto-historical cultures in most areas of the world.  Prehistoric cultures, archaeological sites, and areas of Africa, the Americas, Asia, Europe , and the Pacific will be covered.

3.  Archaeological methods of recovery of information about the past.  Scientific procedures involved in excavation, dating, and preservation of the material record.


ANT 304 • Intro Archaeol Stds: Prehist

31795-31820 • Franklin, Maria
Meets TTH 1:00PM-2:00PM FAC 21 • Hybrid/Blended
GC N1
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An introduction to archaeology as a discipline.  Three major themes that deal with issues of the past will be covered:

1.  A brief history of the discipline, changing theories about various aspects of the past, and the role that the reconstructions of the past play in national and/or group identities.

2.  A survey of the development of human culture from its beginnings to the rise of civilizations and proto-historical cultures in most areas of the world.  Prehistoric cultures, archaeological sites, and areas of Africa, the Americas, Asia, Europe , and the Pacific will be covered.

3.  Archaeological methods of recovery of information about the past.  Scientific procedures involved in excavation, dating, and preservation of the material record.


ANT 304T • Intro To Texas Archaeology-Wb

31824 • Wade, Maria • Internet; Asynchronous
GC N1
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People have been in Texas since about 12,000 years ago and the evidence of their presence throughout time is fascinating.  Ever wondered how we know and can prove that? This course introduces students to Texas archaeology through lectures and interactive virtual labs. Texas geographic and environmental diversity provided prehistoric and historic peoples with unique resources and possibilities, and people used that diversity to make choices and develop specific cultural characteristics while interacting with other peoples from the surrounding regions.

Doing archaeology requires teamwork, critical thinking and multidisciplinary approaches. In archaeology, it is often more important to ask relevant questions than provide ready answers. The lectures and labs in this course aim to emphasize these requirements as well as how archaeology relates to other sciences.

This course may be used to fulfill the natural science and technology component of the common core curriculum and addresses the following four core objectives established by the Texas Higher Education Coordinating Board: communication skills, critical thinking skills, teamwork, and empirical and quantitative skills.


ANT 305 • Expressive Culture

31825-31830 • Campbell, Craig
Meets MW 3:00PM-4:00PM RLP 0.112
SB
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The purpose of this course is to introduce the concept of culture as a crucial dimension of human life. Because we tend to think of thought and action as stemming from individual impulses, we find the notion of a shared, highly variable, but influential force in our lives hard to fathom.  Even if we speak of "society" as a familiar concept, we tend to make of it a uniform, oppressive force, some institution outside ourselves that we individually confront and oppose. Yet only if we can learn to recognize how deeply we share certain assumptions and inclinations with others--but only some others, and to varying degrees--can we appreciate the degree to which culture inheres within us and makes us who we are.


ANT 307 • Culture And Communication

31835-31860 • Webster, Anthony
CDGC SB (also listed as LIN 312C)
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The ability to learn and use language is a quintessentially human characteristic—one that distinguishes homo sapiens from other animal species. Language is simultaneously generated through and generative of social life; the former is a primary resource that we humans use in both the structuring and accomplishment of the latter. These dynamics form the subject of study of linguistic anthropology.

This course is an introduction to linguistic anthropology. It is impossible in a single semester to provide a complete overview of all topics that linguistic anthropologists address, so this course covers selected topics, the selection of which is aimed to illustrate how linguistic anthropologists go about doing their work: the range of topics they examine, the kinds of questions they ask, the types of approaches and methods they utilize, and the sorts of conclusions they reach.


ANT 322N • Hist Of Hindu Relig Traditn

31885 • Maitra, Nabanjan
Meets MWF 12:00PM-1:00PM GAR 0.128
GC (also listed as ANS 340D, HIS 364C, R S 321)
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This course surveys the long and storied history of the religion now known as Hinduism, from the forgotten civilizations of the Indus Valley to the lively and robust traditions of the present day. As we move through the centuries, we will examine how legendary Hindu tales and doctrines continue to speak to each other in their own language, how they inform the lives of native speakers, and reward those who take the time to learn their language. By the end of this course, students will be able to identify key traditions, concepts, and personalities of the Hindu philosophical and mythological traditions and will have developed a foundational cultural literacy in the world’s third largest religion.


ANT 322P • Mexican Immigratn Cul Hist-Wb

31890 • Menchaca, Martha
Meets TTH 11:00AM-12:30PM • Internet; Synchronous
CD
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This course seeks to develop a student's understanding of the history of Mexican

immigration to the U.S. It will provide an overview of migratory patterns dating

back to the late pre-historic period through contemporary times. The focus of the

course, however, will be current immigration issues dealing with: 1) causes of

Mexican immigration: globalization, Mexican politics, agribusiness, 2) U.S. Law,

3) incorporation, and 4) citizenship.


ANT 323P • Anthropol Of The Himalayas

31910 • Hindman, Heather
Meets TTH 2:00PM-3:30PM GAR 2.128
GCWr (also listed as AAS 330L, ANS 361)
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This course looks at the history and culture of the Himalayan region, including Northeast India, sections of Pakistan and Afghanistan, and Tibet, but especially Nepal. Some understanding of Asian history, politics and religion will be helpful (but not necessary) as our attempt will not be a comprehensive survey of the region. The Himalayas have been the site of a great deal of anthropological attention and as such we will be simultaneously be exploring several key theoretical, historical and methodological issues within the discipline of anthropology as we learn about places and people in the region. Particular attention will be paid to the area as a site for negotiating identity (caste and indigeneity), development politics, social movements, music, animals and current political tensions in the region. At the conclusion of the class, students should have a stronger idea of the important role this area has played in the political, religious and social imagination of the world and an appreciation of concepts such as ritual theory, social movements, modernity and gender studies.

 

The numbers…

Participation/Attendance 10%

Student Presentations 10%

Discussion Posting 15%

3 Short papers 35%

Exam 5%

Final Paper 25%


ANT 324L • Archaeology Field Lab Methods

31918 • Ibarrola, Mary
Meets TTH 12:30PM-2:00PM WCP 4.174
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ANT 324L • Blacks/Asians: Race/Soc Mov

31965 • Bhalodia, Aarti
Meets MWF 11:00AM-12:00PM PMA 5.116
CD (also listed as AAS 330D)
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ANT 324L • Coloniality In West Africa

31919 • Davidson De Sa, Celina
Meets MW 2:30PM-4:00PM WCP 5.172
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ANT 324L • Development And Its Critics

31945 • Hindman, Heather
Meets TTH 11:00AM-12:30PM GAR 0.120
GC (also listed as ANS 361)
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Leisure activities have an unstable and tenuous position in academic study – if it is fun, it must not be serious. Tourism, in its connection with a “time off,” certainly suffers from this concern – and anthropologists have their own difficult relation with tourism studies. After all, finding the distinction between the work of “fieldwork” and the relaxation of travel can be difficult for the layperson. With new technologies of movement, the travail of travel is lessening and tourism is open to more people, but what counts as tourism is also changing as well. To explore how, why and the meaning behind a broad array of contemporary travel opportunities, this class takes on a selection of particular themes and issues to consider the influence travel opportunities on that most central concern of anthropology, the encounter with the other. Themes include theorizing travel, the gaze, the toured, authenticity, gender, violence and Asia. This course will also challenge students to consider how their travel activities - both pre and post-Covid-19 - impact the economy, the environment and the “toured” societies. For many places, tourism is a significant contribution to financial flows, often bringing the Global North to the backyard of the Global South. We will also try to understand different “cultures” of travel - how are ideas of work and leisure shaping the demands of new populations of tourists, especially in Asia.

 

The numbers…

  • Participation/Attendance 10%
  • Talking Points 25%
  • Critical Film Review 10%
  • Midterm Exam 10%
  • Social Media 15%
  • Student Presentations 10%
  • Final Project 20%

ANT 324L • Ethnographic Writing-Wb

31955 • Stewart, Kathleen
Meets W 2:00PM-5:00PM • Internet; Synchronous
Wr
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ANT 324L • Evol Thry Id Pol Primatology

31920 • Voyt, Rachel
Meets MW 3:30PM-5:00PM WCP 5.172
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ANT 324L • Historical Archaeology

31922 • Ibarrola, Mary
Meets TTH 2:00PM-3:30PM WCP 4.174
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ANT 324L • Indigenous Peoples Rus/USsr

31960 • Campbell, Craig
Meets TTH 2:00PM-3:30PM WCP 4.118
GC
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ANT 324L • Maya Studs Past Present Future

31923 • Cojti Ren, Iyaxel
Meets MW 2:30PM-4:00PM WCP 4.174
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ANT 324L • Mesoamerican History Oral Trad

31924 • Cojti Ren, Iyaxel
Meets MW 1:00PM-2:30PM WCP 4.174
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ANT 324L • Race Indigineity In Pacific

31925 • Hobart, Hiilei
Meets TTH 11:00AM-12:30PM WCP 4.118
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ANT 324L • Sacred/Ceremonial Textiles

31940 • Shirazi, Faegheh
Meets TTH 9:30AM-11:00AM JES A203A
GC (also listed as ISL 372, MEL 321, WGS 340)
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ANT 324L • Sex Violence Power

31935 • Lewis, Rebecca
Meets MWF 10:00AM-11:00AM GAR 3.116
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ANT 325T • Jewish Folklore

31980 • Gottesman, Itzik
Meets MWF 11:00AM-12:00PM TNH 2.139
GCWr (also listed as GSD 361W, J S 363, R S 357P)
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Dybbuks, golems, evil eye are just some of the more well-known aspects of Jewish folklore, but this course will also examine the folklife of the Jews, their world view, their folk beliefs and fears. Call it folk religion if you will; many of these practices were dismissed by the "offical" Jewish religion as unJewish, but the "folk" persisted and eventually the practice became Judaized and accepted.

Using literary sources, ethnographic memoirs, historical documents, films (among them "The Dybbuk" 1939), folklore collections and field trips (among them - to the oldest Austin Jewish cemetery), we will focus on what makes Jewish folklore Jewish. Among the folklore genres to be examined -folktale, legend, folksong, folk music, custom, belief and of course, Jewish humor.


ANT 347C • Methods In Primate Biology

32020 • Sandel, Aaron
Meets M 1:00PM-2:00PM WCP 4.120
IIWr
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This course focuses on the study of primate behavior and the methods by which animal behavior is observed and documented.  Students will learn how to conduct library research, formulate hypotheses and predictions, devise research projects to test these predictions, collect and analyze data, and write comprehensive research reports describing these results.

1 lecture hour and 3 lab hours per week.


ANT 349D • Anthropological Genetics

32029 • Di Fiore, Anthony
Meets TTH 3:30PM-5:00PM WCP 5.172
IIWr
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This course explores the intersection of genetics and anthropology.  We will cover the basic principles of molecular genetics and population genetics as relates to the study of humans and other primates.  We will examine the ways in which genetics can contribute to the field of anthropology, as well as how anthropological knowledge can illuminate genetic findings.  Students will gain hands-on experience in genetic analysis, and will learn to understand and evaluate molecular anthropology research.  Topics to be covered include: human genetic diversity, human evolution and migration, ancient DNA, primate evolution and behavior, genetic ancestry and identity, genetic essentialism, admixture, eugenics, and the ethical, legal, and social implications of human genetics research.


ANT 350C • Primate Sensory Ecology

32030 • Kirk, Edward
Meets TTH 9:30AM-11:00AM WCP 5.172
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Primate Sensory Ecology is a course designed for advanced undergraduates in physical anthropology and the biological sciences. This course provides an opportunity for detailed study of primate sensory systems from an ecological and comparative phylogenetic perspective.
    The core topics covered in this course are the special senses of hearing, vision, and smell, with a special emphasis on the adaptive and ecological significance of sensory adaptations in primates. For each of these senses, lectures and readings will provide a comprehensive review of the following concepts: 1) general anatomy and physiology, 2) development and genetic regulation, 3) functional morphology and mechanics, 4) neural control and regulation, 5) psychophysics, 6) biological role and behavioral ecology, 7) phylogenetic history and fossil record. Additional senses that will be covered in a less-comprehensive fashion include touch, taste, balance and equilibrium, and the Jacobson's organ.
In studying each sensory system, a strong emphasis will be placed on understanding the relationship between variant morphologies and behavioral capabilities. This dual focus on morphology and behavioral ecology will provide students with an explicit understanding of the effect that the  functional design of a sensory system has on an organism's adaptive niche. All information will be presented within a comparative phylogenetic framework, so that evolutionary novelties (e.g., the haplorhine retinal fovea) can be understood in terms of the macroevolutionary processes responsible for the novel feature's appearance. This approach will further emphasize the importance of certain evolutionary changes in primate sensory systems as key innovations. Toward this end, discussions of current literature will cover a number of special topics in addition to the more basic aspects of sensory system morphology and function.


ANT 366 • Anat And Bio Of Human Skeleton

32035 • Kirk, Edward
Meets TTH 12:30PM-1:00PM WCP 5.172
II
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This course introduces the student to an in-depth study of the human skeleton. Class sessions combine lecture and laboratory sessions and cover topics including developmental biology, functional morphology, and skeletal identification, with a special focus on the latter skill as it relates to forensics and archaeological studies. Students will also be introduced to new 3D imaging techniques for studying the skeleton. 

This class requires both intensive in-class and out-of-class preparation. Participants must be prepared to handle actual human osteological specimens and have a professional approach to this subject and the human remains. An interest in human skeletal identification is especially applicable to the fields of archeology, physical anthropology, health sciences, law, and law enforcement.


ANT 366 • Anat/Bio Human Skeleton-Wb

32040 • Kappelman, John • Internet; Asynchronous
show description

This course introduces the student to an in-depth study of the human skeleton. Class sessions combine lecture and laboratory sessions and cover topics including developmental biology, functional morphology, and skeletal identification, with a special focus on the latter skill as it relates to forensics and archaeological studies. Students will also be introduced to new 3D imaging techniques for studying the skeleton. 

This class requires both intensive in-class and out-of-class preparation. Participants must be prepared to handle actual human osteological specimens and have a professional approach to this subject and the human remains. An interest in human skeletal identification is especially applicable to the fields of archeology, physical anthropology, health sciences, law, and law enforcement.


ANT 392N • Intro To Grad Ling Anthropol

32130 • Handman, Courtney
Meets M 9:00AM-12:00PM WCP 5.124
show description

An Anthropology Core Course, this course is an introduction to the theoretical and methodological foundations of the study of language from a sociocultural perspective. Topics discussed include linguistic, philosophical, psychological, sociological and anthropological contributions to the understanding of verbal and non-verbal communication as a social activity embedded in cultural contexts. No prior training in linguistics is presupposed. Readings include both ethnographic studies and theoretical work about language.


ANT 392P • Intro To Cultural Forms

32135 • Hartigan, John
Meets T 11:00AM-2:00PM WCP 5.124
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Seminar Description: Today cultural analysis is being applied more widely than ever before, across varied domains—expressive, corporate, scientific, and social—that require different types of expertise and knowledge to properly comprehend. In this expansion of the scope of “cultural” as an explanatory framework, a focus on form provides a free-floating type of attention across a range of milieus and mediums. The analysis of form is as ancient as Greek philosophy (e.g. rhetoric) but as current as our interests in the latest technologies. This seminar surveys the variety of ways that an overarching interest in form is fueling interdisciplinary research, particularly in projects that track disparate cultural phenomenon across complex landscapes as they manifest in dense, multi-layered arrangements, often fusing financial, aesthetic, and political interests. We will examine the trend towards melding topic areas—such as “media ecology” or using “publics” with collectives of nonhuman life forms—to devise distinct ways of comprehending emergent cultural objects and activities. Media—as it references an array of substances, instruments, or channels—and mediation (in biotechnologies, communication infrastructures, legal practices, and market expansions) will serve as a basic point of orientation for seminar readings and discussion. Other examples of emergent phenomenon will be drawn from current work in science studies, post-human and biodiversity projects, and urban ecologies, which are each held together by an overriding attention to cultural forms of expression and exchange. The seminar will be divided into thirds: the first provides an overarching framework for an attention to form; the second examines a variety of forms (visual, sonic, urban, etc.); the final third focuses on applying these perspectives.

Seminar Dynamics: This initial stage of the seminar will feature a combination of lectures and readings: the first half of each session will primarily be lecture-oriented with a discussion following in the second half. Depending on the pace of discussions we can shift away from lectures entirely as we progress through the semester. A key objective is for participants to apply these analytical approaches, either in relation to their specific areas of research or in a more general manner. The mechanism for doing this will be a series of short, informal essays (3 or 4) in which participants develop sketches of objects, settings, or dynamics via an attention to cultural form.


ANT 394M • Representational Practices

32150 • Strong, Pauline
Meets T 9:30AM-12:30PM WCP 4.120
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ANT 394M • Worlding-Wb

32145 • Stewart, Kathleen
Meets F 9:00AM-12:00PM • Internet; Synchronous
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ANT 432L • Primate Anatomy

32010 • Shapiro, Liza
Meets TTH 11:00AM-12:30PM WCP 5.172
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An exploration of the relationship between primate anatomical form and function, with emphasis on adaptations to diet and locomotion.  The course is also designed to demonstrate how such information can be applied to the fossil record in order to reconstruct the evolutionary development of primate adaptations.

There is a two hour lab section associated with this class.