Department of Anthropology

ANT 301 • Biological Anthropology

30765-30820 • Reed, Denne
Meets TTH 12:30PM-1:30PM BEL 328
N1
show description

This course is an introduction to the principles and the methods of biological anthropology, the study of human beings from a biological perspective.  It is a field that seeks to explain our relationship to other primates and to the rest of the natural world.  In other words: Who are we? How are we unique? How, why, and when did we come to be the way that we are? The study of biological anthropology requires many different types of knowledge.  Throughout the course, we will examine anatomical, behavioral, and genetic similarities and differences among the living primates, learn the basic mechanisms of evolution, and trace the path of human evolution as reconstructed from the fossil record.  The main goal of the course is to obtain a clear understanding of our place in nature.


ANT 301 • Biological Anthropology-Honors

30825 • Kirk, Edward
Meets TTH 12:30PM-2:00PM WCP 5.172
N1
show description

This course is an introduction to the principles and the methods of biological anthropology, the study of human beings from a biological perspective.  It is a field that seeks to explain our relationship to other primates and to the rest of the natural world.  In other words: Who are we? How are we unique? How, why, and when did we come to be the way that we are? The study of biological anthropology requires many different types of knowledge.  Throughout the course, we will examine anatomical, behavioral, and genetic similarities and differences among the living primates, learn the basic mechanisms of evolution, and trace the path of human evolution as reconstructed from the fossil record.  The main goal of the course is to obtain a clear understanding of our place in nature.


ANT 301 • Biological Anthropology-Wb

30830 • Kappelman, John
N1
show description

This course is an introduction to the principles and the methods of biological anthropology, the study of human beings from a biological perspective.  It is a field that seeks to explain our relationship to other primates and to the rest of the natural world.  In other words: Who are we? How are we unique? How, why, and when did we come to be the way that we are? The study of biological anthropology requires many different types of knowledge.  Throughout the course, we will examine anatomical, behavioral, and genetic similarities and differences among the living primates, learn the basic mechanisms of evolution, and trace the path of human evolution as reconstructed from the fossil record.  The main goal of the course is to obtain a clear understanding of our place in nature.


ANT 302 • Cultural Anthropology

30835-30860 • Hartigan, John
Meets MW 10:00AM-11:00AM FAC 21 • Internet
GC SB
show description

This course focuses on "classic" themes in anthropology such as ethnicity, language, adaptation, marriage, kinship, gender, religion, and social stratification.  We will consider anthropological theory from its 19th-century origins to the present.  The course also explores the nature of ethnographic field work, especially the relationship between the anthropologist and the field community.  
The lectures, readings, and films for this course have been selected with the objective of exploring the social meanings with which diverse groups invest their life.  By comparing and analyzing the similarities and differences between "us" and "others," both within the borders of the U.S. and abroad, the anthropological perspective can expose some of our own cultural assumptions and enable us to better understand diverse cultures.


ANT 302 • Cultural Anthropology

30865-30890 • Ali, Kamran
Meets MW 2:00PM-3:00PM GAR 0.102 • Internet
GC SB
show description

This course focuses on "classic" themes in anthropology such as ethnicity, language, adaptation, marriage, kinship, gender, religion, and social stratification.  We will consider anthropological theory from its 19th-century origins to the present.  The course also explores the nature of ethnographic field work, especially the relationship between the anthropologist and the field community.  
The lectures, readings, and films for this course have been selected with the objective of exploring the social meanings with which diverse groups invest their life.  By comparing and analyzing the similarities and differences between "us" and "others," both within the borders of the U.S. and abroad, the anthropological perspective can expose some of our own cultural assumptions and enable us to better understand diverse cultures.


ANT 302 • Cultural Anthropology-Wb

30895 • Sturm, Circe
CDGC SB
show description

This course focuses on "classic" themes in anthropology such as ethnicity, language, adaptation, marriage, kinship, gender, religion, and social stratification.  We will consider anthropological theory from its 19th-century origins to the present.  The course also explores the nature of ethnographic field work, especially the relationship between the anthropologist and the field community.  
The lectures, readings, and films for this course have been selected with the objective of exploring the social meanings with which diverse groups invest their life.  By comparing and analyzing the similarities and differences between "us" and "others," both within the borders of the U.S. and abroad, the anthropological perspective can expose some of our own cultural assumptions and enable us to better understand diverse cultures.


ANT 304 • Intro Archaeol Stds: Prehist

30940-30955 • Franklin, Maria
Meets MW 11:00AM-12:00PM RLP 0.126 • Internet
GC N1
show description

An introduction to archaeology as a discipline.  Three major themes that deal with issues of the past will be covered:

1.  A brief history of the discipline, changing theories about various aspects of the past, and the role that the reconstructions of the past play in national and/or group identities.

2.  A survey of the development of human culture from its beginnings to the rise of civilizations and proto-historical cultures in most areas of the world.  Prehistoric cultures, archaeological sites, and areas of Africa, the Americas, Asia, Europe , and the Pacific will be covered.

3.  Archaeological methods of recovery of information about the past.  Scientific procedures involved in excavation, dating, and preservation of the material record.


ANT 304 • Intro Archaeol Stds: Prehist

30900-30935 • Valdez, Fred
Meets MW 9:00AM-10:00AM ART 1.102 • Internet
GC N1
show description

An introduction to archaeology as a discipline.  Three major themes that deal with issues of the past will be covered:

1.  A brief history of the discipline, changing theories about various aspects of the past, and the role that the reconstructions of the past play in national and/or group identities.

2.  A survey of the development of human culture from its beginnings to the rise of civilizations and proto-historical cultures in most areas of the world.  Prehistoric cultures, archaeological sites, and areas of Africa, the Americas, Asia, Europe , and the Pacific will be covered.

3.  Archaeological methods of recovery of information about the past.  Scientific procedures involved in excavation, dating, and preservation of the material record.


ANT 304T • Intro To Texas Archaeology-Wb

30960 • Wade, Maria
CD N1
show description

People have been in Texas since about 12,000 years ago and the evidence of their presence throughout time is fascinating.  Ever wondered how we know and can prove that? This course introduces students to Texas archaeology through lectures, interactive virtual labs and hands-on laboratory sections that emphasize experimentation. Texas geographic and environmental diversity provided prehistoric and historic peoples with unique resources and possibilities, and people used that diversity to make choices and develop specific cultural characteristics while interacting with other peoples from the surrounding regions.

Doing archaeology requires teamwork, critical thinking and multidisciplinary approaches. In archaeology, it is often more important to ask relevant questions than provide ready answers. The lectures and labs in this course aim to emphasize these requirements as well as how archaeology relates to other sciences.

This course may be used to fulfill the natural science and technology (Part II) component of the common core curriculum and addresses the following four core objectives established by the Texas Higher Education Coordinating Board: communication skills, critical thinking skills, teamwork, and empirical and quantitative skills.


ANT 305 • Expressive Culture

30965-30980 • Campbell, Craig
Meets TTH 2:00PM-3:00PM GEA 105 • Internet
SB
show description

The purpose of this course is to introduce the concept of culture as a crucial dimension of human life. Because we tend to think of thought and action as stemming from individual impulses, we find the notion of a shared, highly variable, but influential force in our lives hard to fathom.  Even if we speak of "society" as a familiar concept, we tend to make of it a uniform, oppressive force, some institution outside ourselves that we individually confront and oppose. Yet only if we can learn to recognize how deeply we share certain assumptions and inclinations with others--but only some others, and to varying degrees--can we appreciate the degree to which culture inheres within us and makes us who we are.


ANT 307 • Culture And Communication

30985-31010 • Keating, Elizabeth
Meets MW 2:00PM-3:00PM PAI 3.02 • Internet
CDGC SB
show description

The ability to learn and use language is a quintessentially human characteristic—one that distinguishes homo sapiens from other animal species. Language is simultaneously generated through and generative of social life; the former is a primary resource that we humans use in both the structuring and accomplishment of the latter. These dynamics form the subject of study of linguistic anthropology.

This course is an introduction to linguistic anthropology. It is impossible in a single semester to provide a complete overview of all topics that linguistic anthropologists address, so this course covers selected topics, the selection of which is aimed to illustrate how linguistic anthropologists go about doing their work: the range of topics they examine, the kinds of questions they ask, the types of approaches and methods they utilize, and the sorts of conclusions they reach.


ANT 310L • Diaspora: Race/Natn/Resist

31025 • Makalani, Minkah
Meets MW 11:30AM-1:00PM RLM 5.124
(also listed as AFR 315R)
show description

Please check back with updates.


ANT 311D • Intro To Jewish Studies

31030 • Weinreb, Amelia
Meets MWF 12:00PM-1:00PM SZB 284 • Two-way Interactive Video
EGC (also listed as J S 301, MES 310, R S 313D)
show description

A hybrid two-way interactive course with a combination of classroom lectures and live-streamed discussions

Course Description

This survey course aims to expose students to major themes in Jewish Studies through guest lectures by UT faculty who work in the field. It is recommended for motivated undergraduates in any discipline with an intellectual curiosity about Jewish Studies, but requires no previous knowledge of Jewish religion, ethnicity, or culture. The material in the course is not designed be comprehensive, but rather provides a curated sample of lectures and core topics. This semester, the course is organized around three thematic units: 1) Exile and Diaspora, 2) Jewish Identity, and 3) Jewish Ethics.

The weekly rhythm of the course is generally as follows: On Mondays and Wednesdays, various faculty associated with Jewish Studies will visit the classroom and deliver lectures concentrating on their period, geographical area, and field of research as they relate to the thematic unit at hand. Fridays are a series of lively, fast-paced, interactive meetings, led by students. Students are encouraged to consider course materials comparatively, in view of both their distinct features and their overarching threads, and defend positions through evidence based both on lectures and the course reader. Student discussion leaders, designated in advance, will raise questions, stimulate debate, and integrate ideas into our collective analysis.


ANT 322G • Cultural Geographies Israel

31040 • Weinreb, Amelia
Meets MWF 1:00PM-2:00PM SZB 286 • Video Tape and/or Broadcast TV
GC (also listed as J S 365D, MES 341)
show description

A hybrid, two-way interactive course with a combination of livestreaming and classroom meet-ups

This multidisciplinary, interactive, hybrid seminar is designed to foster conversation and creative projects about the cultural geography of Israel between upper-division students with interests in Jewish studies, Middle Eastern studies, anthropology, and geography. What makes this course unique is that it about 50% of the course is taught online from Israel by Dr. Amy Weinreb. To enhance absorption of course
texts, students will have the opportunity to virtually join the instructor in various locations in Israel throughout the semester using Zoom, and also GoPro technology. The aim is to bring Israel’s contemporary spaces, places and landscapes to life visually.


ANT 322J • Goddesses World Relig/Cul

31045 • Selby, Martha
Meets TTH 2:00PM-3:30PM BUR 136
GC (also listed as ANS 340F, R S 373G, WGS 340)
show description

This course will provide a historical and cross-cultural overview of the relationship between feminine and religious cultural expressions through comparative examinations and analyses of various goddess figures in world religions.  We will begin our study in Asia; specifically in India, where goddess worship is a vital part of contemporary Hinduism in all parts of the subcontinent.  From the goddesses of the Hindu tradition (K?l? and Laks?m?, for example), we will move on to female figures in the Buddhist Mah?y?na pantheon (such as Kuan-Yin, popular in China, Korea, and Japan), and then on to some of the goddesses of western antiquity (Inanna, Isis, Athena, Aphrodite, and Mary in her aspects as mother and intercessor).  We will end the course with a study of contemporary goddess worship in the United States as an important expression of Neo-Paganism.  Issues relating to gender, sexuality, power, and violence (domestic and political) will be emphasized as themes throughout the course.


ANT 324L • Anthropol Of The Himalayas

31085 • Hindman, Heather
Meets TTH 2:00PM-3:30PM RLP 0.122
CDGCWr (also listed as ANS 361)
show description

This course looks at the history and culture of the Himalayan region, including the northern hills of India, (briefly) sections of Pakistan and Afghanistan, Tibet but especially Nepal. Some understanding of Asian history, politics and religion will be helpful (but not necessary) as our attempt will not be a comprehensive survey of the region. The Himalayas have been the site of a great deal of anthropological attention and as such we will be simultaneously be exploring several key theoretical, historical and methodological issues within the discipline of anthropology as we learn about places and people in the region. Particular attention will be paid to the area as a site for exoticism by the Occident (as the Shangri-la phenomenon), development politics, the environment, mountaineering and tourism as well as the current political tensions in the region. At the conclusion of the class, students should have a stronger idea of the important role this area has played in the political, religious and social imagination of the world and an appreciation of concepts such as ritual theory, social movements, modernity and gender studies.


ANT 324L • Anthropology Of Infrastructure

31090 • Peterson, Marina
Meets F 9:00AM-12:00PM WCP 5.118
CDIIWr
show description

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ANT 324L • Ethnogrphic Theory/Practice

31115 • Sturm, Circe
Meets TTH 12:30PM-2:00PM WCP 4.174
CDWr
show description

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ANT 324L • Gis/Rem Sns Archaeol/Paleo

31110 • Reed, Denne
Meets TTH 9:30AM-11:00AM RLP 1.402
CDQRWr (also listed as GRG 356T)
show description

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ANT 324L • Inca World

31120 • Covey, Ronald
Meets TTH 9:30AM-11:00AM WCP 4.174
CDWr
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ANT 324L • Topics In Anthropology

31095
Meets TTH 2:00PM-3:30PM GDC 1.406
CDWr
show description

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ANT 324L • Topics In Anthropology

31100-31105
Meets MW 2:30PM-3:30PM RLP 0.102
CDWr
show description

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ANT 325U • Austin Jews Cvl Rights Era

31145 • Seriff, Suzanne
Meets TTH 12:30PM-2:00PM WCP 4.118
(also listed as AMS 324J, J S 364)
show description

Segregation protests, sit-ins, free love, flower power—Revolution was in the air on 1960’s college campuses—UT included. Where were the Jews? In/out? Right/Left? Greek/geek? Activist/Pacifist? Gay/Straight? White/Other? Students will learn the art of oral history and digital storytelling to uncover the untold tales of UT’s Jewish students in the Age of Aquarius.


ANT 326L • Cultures In Contact

31150 • Covey, Ronald
Meets TTH 11:00AM-12:30PM WCP 4.174
CDWr
show description

"Cultures in Contact" is a multi-disciplinary course which combines Historical, Anthropological, Geographical and Literary analyses of the continuing "contact period" in the New World.  The issues addressed span the last 500+ years of cultural interaction in the Americas, looking especially at the processes of cultural interaction, competition, cooperation, and synthesis that have taken place among people from the Americas, Europe, Africa, and Asia.


ANT 330C • Theories Of Culture & Society

31155 • Keeler, Ward
Meets TTH 9:30AM-11:00AM RLP 0.106
Wr
show description

The purpose of this course is to introduce students to a set of core ideas and propositions in social

theory broadly and theories of culture and society specifically. The course aims to do this by teaching

strategies for thinking with and against, writing about, using, and engaging theoretical texts. The course

works forward from the mid-19th century, engaging a highly selective set of thinkers who provide core

foundations in contemporary social and anthropological thought. It then moves into a series of

explorations of the ways that anthropological theories of culture and society written in the early and

mid-twentieth century continue to fuel debates in anthropology today. It closes with a brief

introduction to a series of transformations in social and cultural theory from the 1970s forward,

particularly postcolonial theory and post-structuralism. The course makes no claim to be

comprehensive. Rather, it aims to teach students how to work with and through social theory and to

prepare them for further encounters with social theory in academic work and in the “world beyond.”

The course is conceived primarily for majors but above all for students who are committed to working

with difficult, influential, and fascinating texts. The course combines lecture and seminar discussion. The

course integrates an intense and demanding regime of reading and discussion with an equally intense

and demanding program of writing. The aim is to encourage students to develop the habit of writing

clear and concise prose, especially when engaging with difficult and complex ideas.


ANT 346L • Primate Social Behavior

31165 • Lewis, Rebecca
Meets MWF 11:00AM-12:00PM WCP 5.172
show description

This course focuses on the study of primate social behavior. It explores the basic theoretical principles that guide primatologists.

Topics covered include: evolutionary theory, primate diversity, social and mating systems, sexual selection, life history, cooperation, competition, intelligence, communication, and human behavior.


ANT 346M • Comparative Primate Ecology

31170 • Lewis, Rebecca
Meets MWF 10:00AM-11:00AM WCP 5.172
show description

Comparative Primate Ecology will explore the following topics with respect to primates: population ecology, community ecology, feeding adaptations, foraging strategies, ranging behavior, and life history strategies.


ANT 366 • Anat And Bio Of Human Skeleton

31185 • Kappelman, John
Meets MW 1:00PM-1:30PM WCP 5.172
II
show description

This course introduces the student to an in-depth study of the human skeleton. Class sessions combine lecture and laboratory sessions and cover topics including developmental biology, functional morphology, and skeletal identification, with a special focus on the latter skill as it relates to forensics and archaeological studies. Students will also be introduced to new 3D imaging techniques for studying the skeleton. 

This class requires both intensive in-class and out-of-class preparation. Participants must be prepared to handle actual human osteological specimens and have a professional approach to this subject and the human remains. An interest in human skeletal identification is especially applicable to the fields of archeology, physical anthropology, health sciences, law, and law enforcement.


ANT 366 • Anat/Bio Human Skeleton-Wb

31190 • Kappelman, John
II
show description

This course introduces the student to an in-depth study of the human skeleton. Class sessions combine lecture and laboratory sessions and cover topics including developmental biology, functional morphology, and skeletal identification, with a special focus on the latter skill as it relates to forensics and archaeological studies. Students will also be introduced to new 3D imaging techniques for studying the skeleton. 

This class requires both intensive in-class and out-of-class preparation. Participants must be prepared to handle actual human osteological specimens and have a professional approach to this subject and the human remains. An interest in human skeletal identification is especially applicable to the fields of archeology, physical anthropology, health sciences, law, and law enforcement.


ANT 392K • Intro To Graduate Archaeology

31265 • Rodriguez, Enrique
Meets T 2:00PM-5:00PM WCP 5.118
show description

This course will provide a developmental overview of theoretical and methodological issues in archæology.  The course will emphasize readings related to how we think about archæology as a social science, its concepts and methods, and its relation to history and anthropology.  The course will consist of fourteen lecture-discussion sessions.


ANT 392L • Biol Anthro: Morph/Evolution

31270 • Shapiro, Liza
Meets T 2:00PM-5:00PM WCP 4.120
show description

Content and Scope:  Why are humans unique in so many features; in having culture and language; in being bipedal; in the way we gather our food, and its extraordinary range; in our social and sexual behavior and its variability?  This course examines patterns of anatomical, behavioral, and genetic similarities and differences among living primates and humans, and the evidence for human evolution as reconstructed from the fossil record.  A wide range of evidence from the natural and social sciences is presented to understand present and past anatomical and behavioral adaptations, and to view humans and our ancestors as members of diverse animal and plant communities.  Our goal is to understand the place of humans in the world.


ANT 392M • Intro To Grad Social Anthro

31275 • Peterson, Marina
Meets T 9:30AM-12:30PM WCP 5.124
show description

This course introduces doctoral students to major texts in sociocultural theory that have been central to the development of the discipline of anthropology from its colonial roots in North America and Western Europe to the contemporary period. While not a comprehensive history of anthropological theory, this course provides a chronological and contextualized perspective as it explores and interprets the relationships between varying and, at times, competing theoretical, epistemological, and ethical claims on anthropology and related disciplines. Based on classical scholarship by some of the “founding fathers” of modern social science, this course traces parts of the genealogical trajectories taken by the anthropological study of culture and society. Following that intellectual legacy, this course asks a central question: How can we make sense of sociocultural anthropology as an academic discipline today? Problematizing the role the concept of “culture” has played in shaping the idea of the “field,” we will look at “location” as a principal site of epistemological limitation and possibility for anthropological research.


ANT 394M • Affect

31285 • Stewart, Kathleen
Meets W 1:00PM-4:00PM WCP 5.118
show description

 

 


ANT 432L • Primate Anatomy

31160 • Shapiro, Liza
Meets TTH 11:00AM-12:30PM WCP 5.172
show description

An exploration of the relationship between primate anatomical form and function, with emphasis on adaptations to diet and locomotion.  The course is also designed to demonstrate how such information can be applied to the fossil record in order to reconstruct the evolutionary development of primate adaptations.

There is a two hour lab section associated with this class.


ANT 453 • Archaeological Analysis

31180 • Valdez, Fred
Meets MW 10:00AM-12:00PM WCP 4.174
show description

The purpose of this course to provide you (the course participants) with a background to “the kinds” of archaeological analyses that often occur, “what” is involved in archaeological analysis, and “how” archaeological analysis may be approached. This means learning what questions to ask about a field or laboratory project and the steps needed to understand the type of analysis required. From this course you should also become aware of “how to do” an analysis from start (first learning about certain material culture) to completion (doing the analysis and the report writing).

 

 

Prerequisite: Anthropology 304 or Archaeology 301.