Department of Anthropology

ANT 301 • Biological Anthropology

32100-32165 • Kirk, Edward
Meets TTH 12:30PM-1:30PM ART 1.102
N1
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This course is an introduction to the principles and the methods of biological anthropology, the study of human beings from a biological perspective.  It is a field that seeks to explain our relationship to other primates and to the rest of the natural world.  In other words: Who are we? How are we unique? How, why, and when did we come to be the way that we are? The study of biological anthropology requires many different types of knowledge.  Throughout the course, we will examine anatomical, behavioral, and genetic similarities and differences among the living primates, learn the basic mechanisms of evolution, and trace the path of human evolution as reconstructed from the fossil record.  The main goal of the course is to obtain a clear understanding of our place in nature.


ANT 301 • Biological Anthropology-Wb

32170 • Kappelman, John • Internet; Asynchronous
N1
show description

This course is an introduction to the principles and the methods of biological anthropology, the study of human beings from a biological perspective.  It is a field that seeks to explain our relationship to other primates and to the rest of the natural world.  In other words: Who are we? How are we unique? How, why, and when did we come to be the way that we are? The study of biological anthropology requires many different types of knowledge.  Throughout the course, we will examine anatomical, behavioral, and genetic similarities and differences among the living primates, learn the basic mechanisms of evolution, and trace the path of human evolution as reconstructed from the fossil record.  The main goal of the course is to obtain a clear understanding of our place in nature.


ANT 302 • Cultural Anthropology

32175-32230 • Hartigan, John
Meets MW 9:00AM-10:00AM FAC 21
GC SB
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This course focuses on "classic" themes in anthropology such as ethnicity, language, adaptation, marriage, kinship, gender, religion, and social stratification.  We will consider anthropological theory from its 19th-century origins to the present.  The course also explores the nature of ethnographic field work, especially the relationship between the anthropologist and the field community.  
The lectures, readings, and films for this course have been selected with the objective of exploring the social meanings with which diverse groups invest their life.  By comparing and analyzing the similarities and differences between "us" and "others," both within the borders of the U.S. and abroad, the anthropological perspective can expose some of our own cultural assumptions and enable us to better understand diverse cultures.


ANT 302 • Cultural Anthropology-Wb

32235 • Sturm, Circe • Internet; Asynchronous
CDGC SB
show description

This course focuses on "classic" themes in anthropology such as ethnicity, language, adaptation, marriage, kinship, gender, religion, and social stratification.  We will consider anthropological theory from its 19th-century origins to the present.  The course also explores the nature of ethnographic field work, especially the relationship between the anthropologist and the field community.  
The lectures, readings, and films for this course have been selected with the objective of exploring the social meanings with which diverse groups invest their life.  By comparing and analyzing the similarities and differences between "us" and "others," both within the borders of the U.S. and abroad, the anthropological perspective can expose some of our own cultural assumptions and enable us to better understand diverse cultures.


ANT 304 • Intro Archaeol Stds: Prehist

32240-32301 • Valdez, Fred
Meets MW 10:00AM-11:00AM WCP 1.402
GC N1
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An introduction to archaeology as a discipline.  Three major themes that deal with issues of the past will be covered:

1.  A brief history of the discipline, changing theories about various aspects of the past, and the role that the reconstructions of the past play in national and/or group identities.

2.  A survey of the development of human culture from its beginnings to the rise of civilizations and proto-historical cultures in most areas of the world.  Prehistoric cultures, archaeological sites, and areas of Africa, the Americas, Asia, Europe , and the Pacific will be covered.

3.  Archaeological methods of recovery of information about the past.  Scientific procedures involved in excavation, dating, and preservation of the material record.


ANT 304 • Intro Archaeol Stds: Prehist

32285-32300 • Sanchez Morales, Lara
Meets MW 1:00PM-2:00PM PAI 4.42
GC N1
show description

An introduction to archaeology as a discipline.  Three major themes that deal with issues of the past will be covered:

1.  A brief history of the discipline, changing theories about various aspects of the past, and the role that the reconstructions of the past play in national and/or group identities.

2.  A survey of the development of human culture from its beginnings to the rise of civilizations and proto-historical cultures in most areas of the world.  Prehistoric cultures, archaeological sites, and areas of Africa, the Americas, Asia, Europe , and the Pacific will be covered.

3.  Archaeological methods of recovery of information about the past.  Scientific procedures involved in excavation, dating, and preservation of the material record.


ANT 305 • Expressive Culture

32305-32310 • Farrell, Christopher
Meets MW 11:00AM-12:00PM RLP 0.112
SB
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The purpose of this course is to introduce the concept of culture as a crucial dimension of human life. Because we tend to think of thought and action as stemming from individual impulses, we find the notion of a shared, highly variable, but influential force in our lives hard to fathom.  Even if we speak of "society" as a familiar concept, we tend to make of it a uniform, oppressive force, some institution outside ourselves that we individually confront and oppose. Yet only if we can learn to recognize how deeply we share certain assumptions and inclinations with others--but only some others, and to varying degrees--can we appreciate the degree to which culture inheres within us and makes us who we are.


ANT 307 • Culture And Communication

32315-32346 • Keating, Elizabeth
Meets MW 2:00PM-3:00PM FAC 21
CDGC SB (also listed as LIN 312C)
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The ability to learn and use language is a quintessentially human characteristic—one that distinguishes homo sapiens from other animal species. Language is simultaneously generated through and generative of social life; the former is a primary resource that we humans use in both the structuring and accomplishment of the latter. These dynamics form the subject of study of linguistic anthropology.

This course is an introduction to linguistic anthropology. It is impossible in a single semester to provide a complete overview of all topics that linguistic anthropologists address, so this course covers selected topics, the selection of which is aimed to illustrate how linguistic anthropologists go about doing their work: the range of topics they examine, the kinds of questions they ask, the types of approaches and methods they utilize, and the sorts of conclusions they reach.


ANT 310L • Black Queer Art Worlds

32369 • Gill, Lyndon
Meets TTH 12:30PM-2:00PM PAR 308
CDGC (also listed as AFR 315Q, WGS 301)
show description

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ANT 310L • Introduction To South Asia

32365 • Rajpurohit, Dalpat
Meets TTH 11:00AM-12:30PM RLP 1.106
GC (also listed as ANS 302K)
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This course is an introduction to South Asian cultures and histories. Students will be introduced to major thinkers, ideas, histories, issues, and movements of South Asia. While a clear set of factual information will be integral to the course, the equally important goal of the course is to learn to understand South Asian literatures, art, religion, law, or other cultural expressions as sources for our own humanistic and ethical development. Thus, the primary goal of this course is to train students in how to “read” South Asia in such a way that it can mean something to them.

 

Grading:

  • Attendance and Participation (20%)
  • Reading responses and Documentary and Film Review (25%)
  • Three in class written quizzes (30%)
  • Book Review (10%)
  • Final Presentation (15%)

ANT 322E • Self/Culture In North Korea

32375 • Oppenheim, Robert
Meets TTH 5:00PM-6:30PM GAR 0.128
GC (also listed as ANS 361N)
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The Democratic People’s Republic of Korea (commonly called North Korea) is often described as closed or unknowable, and simultaneously characterized in much U.S. public discussion as alternatively threatening, crazy/irrational, or simply pathetic. It is very rare to hear something about North Korea other than nuclear weapons, famine, or human rights/refugees; it is sometimes hard to imagine that there is an actual society there. Yet in recent years, there has emerged a growing scholarly literature precisely concerned with understanding North Korea’s historical development and its current workings as a social, cultural, and political/ideological system. Self and Culture in North Korea is focused on the questions this literature raises.

 

Grading:

  • A and B class presentations (5% each, 10% total)
  • Short assignments (5 x 5%=25% total)
  • Papers (10% + 15%=25% total)
  • Take-home, open-book midterm exam (15%)
  • Take-home, open-book final exam (15%)
  • General class participation and discussion (10%)

ANT 322J • Goddesses World Relig/Cul

32390 • Selby, Martha
Meets TTH 11:00AM-12:30PM BUR 108
GC (also listed as ANS 340F, R S 373G, WGS 340)
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This course will provide a historical and cross-cultural overview of the relationship between feminine and religious cultural expressions through comparative examinations and analyses of various goddess figures in world religions. We will begin our study in Asia; specifically in India, where goddess worship is a vital part of contemporary Hinduism in all parts of the subcontinent. From the goddesses of the Hindu tradition (Kālī and Lakṣmī, for example), we will move on to female figures in the Jain and Buddhist Mahāyāna pantheons (such as Kuan-Yin, popular in China, Korea, and Japan), and then on to some of the goddesses of western antiquity (Inanna, Isis, Athena, and Aphrodite), including a brief consideration of Mary in her various goddess aspects. We will end the course with a brief study of “neo-pagan” goddess worship in America. Issues relating to gender, sexuality, power, and violence (domestic and political) will be emphasized as themes throughout the course.

 


ANT 322Q • Mexican Amer Indig Heritage

32395 • Menchaca, Martha
Meets MW 2:30PM-4:00PM WCP 4.174
CD (also listed as LAS 324L, MAS 374)
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This course examines the cultural prehistory and racial history of Mexican Americans

from 1519 to the present. The purpose of the course is to examine how policies and

laws enacted by the governments of Spain, Mexico, and the U.S. impacted the ethnic

and racial identities of Mexican Americans. The geographic focus of the course is

Mexico and the United States Southwest.


ANT 324G • Environmental Anthropology

32408-32409 • Cons, Jason
Meets MW 10:00AM-11:00AM RLP 0.112
GCII
show description

What is the relationship between culture and ecology? How can environments produce

inequalities? Is there such a thing as wilderness? Where is the boundary between the human

and the non-human? How is “nature” understood in different communities? And how do

people around the world live with toxicity, climate change, and other forms environmental

degradation? Environmental Anthropology explores the answers to these questions and more.

The course is designed around a set of key questions and challenges in the anthropological

study of the environment. Its purpose is not to provide a survey of the history of the field, but

rather to introduce students to a set of questions and analytic tools and invite them to quickly

move towards applying them to real-world cases.


ANT 324L • Arab Latin Americas

32410 • Merabet, Sofian
Meets TTH 9:30AM-11:00AM JES A207A
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Based on the comparative approach between different countries in the Americas, this interdisciplinary course examines the ways in which Arab immigrant identities have been negotiated and coopted socially, but also institutionally, in various countries in the Western Hemisphere. Drawing on textual and visual materials surrounding debates about ethnicity, religion, and citizenship, the course explores the interplay of cultural, social, political and economic factors in shaping what we may call “Arab-(Latin) American identities.” The class is intended to expose students to sociocultural and political issues pertaining to ethnic, national, and religious identity formation in countries such as Argentina, Brazil, Chile, and Mexico. While the perspective of this course will be primarily anthropological, it will also be informed by historical, sociological, and literary approaches. Moreover, in an effort to increase students’ familiarity with Arab-(Latin) American history and culture, the course will closely explore the practices, beliefs, and collective accounts in various parts of the continent and encourages participants to reflect on their own transnational experiences within the increasingly globalized world we inhabit. Among other things, we will work to grasp the similarities and differences regarding everyday ethnic, linguistic, and national politics among Arab immigrants and their descendants living in Latin America today, especially as these are shaped by historical processes associated with war and nation-state-building as well as by the power of representations mobilized in a global world. This class will be taught in a seminar format with occasional lectures given by the instructor.


ANT 324L • Archaeol Of Climate Change

32460 • Rosen, Arlene
Meets MW 3:00PM-4:30PM RLP 0.102
EGC (also listed as GRG 321L)
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Course Description: Climate change has impacted human societies over the course of human existence on the planet. It has played a role in everything from hominin evolution to the rise and fall of civilizations through to the present day economic and ethical decision-making. In this course we will examine why climate changes, the methods for recording climate change, and discuss case studies of the varied responses of past human societies to climate change in different geographic regions and time periods with varying socio-political and economic systems. We will explore aspects of resilience and rigidity of societies and issues of environmental sustainability in the past as well as the present. Finally we will compare and contrast modern responses to climate change on a global scale with those of past societies.

Goals: To familiarize students with the evidence for climate change and methods of climate change research; to increase their understanding of the social, economic and technological issues human societies faced in the past when dealing with climate change. To understand what were adaptive and maladaptive human strategies. To help students evaluate the modern politics and social responses to climate change. On successful completion of this course a student should understand how climate change is recorded and the basic climatic record for the period of human occupation of the earth. To be familiar with current debates about how human societies adapt to climate change. To be able to think critically about issues and arguments proposed in the literature, and to write a coherent essay arguing a point of view.

Flags:

Ethics

This course carries the Ethics and Leadership flag. Ethics and Leadership courses are designed to equip you with skills that are necessary for making ethical decisions in your adult and professional life. You should therefore expect a substantial portion of your grade to come from assignments involving ethical issues and the process of applying ethical reasoning to real-life situations.

Global Cultures

This course carries the Global Cultures flag. Global Cultures courses are designed to increase your familiarity with cultural groups outside the United States. You should therefore expect a substantial portion of your grade to come from assignments covering the practices, beliefs, and histories of at least one non-U.S. cultural group, past or present.


ANT 324L • Decolonial Intersectionality

32415 • Casumbal-Salazar, Iokepa
Meets TTH 12:30PM-2:00PM WCP 4.118
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This course adopts the concept of intersectionality within feminist thinking to stage conversations about gender, race, and indigeneity in the context of ongoing colonial formations. Intersectionality is a way to think about the interconnections of ideas, events, identities, and relations. Initially meant to bring gender-thinking and race-thinking together, the concept has grown to include other key vectors of power including class, sexuality, ability, religion, and more. While even within critical feminist, gender, and ethnic studies, colonization is often treated only superficially, this course prioritizes it—as an analytic and a structure—by centering Native voices. To this end, the course stages conversations that transit feminist, queer, and critical race theories as well as critical Indigenous theory. We will examine the racialization of indigeneity, the violence of liberal inclusion, and heteropatriarchy as they inform both settler and Indigenous subject formations. Other course topics include Native feminisms, African indigeneities, Black Indians, Asian settler colonialism in Hawaiʻi, Two-Spirit politics, queer indigeneities, Native masculinities, and indigeneity as performance, among other topics. By the end of the semester, students will have developed a working knowledge of how colonization, gender, and race intersect and interlock to produce distinct hierarchies and subjectivities that underpin the continued subjugation of Indigenous peoples and demand broader critical attention.


ANT 324L • Expressive Arts Global Africa

32435 • De Sa, Celina
Meets TTH 2:00PM-3:30PM WCP 4.118
show description

This course is an exploration of music, dance and other artistic forms as a modes of political expression and community building. We will cover a wide range of issues from the ways that race and gender inform "African dance” classes in neoliberal Sweden to how Afrofuturistic photography tackles themes of climate change. The goal of the course is to gain an understanding of how transnational artistic expression emerging from the African continent can be a form of protest and social commentary.


ANT 324L • Gis/Rem Sns Archaeol/Paleo

32448 • Garrison, Thomas
Meets MW 10:00AM-11:30AM RLP 1.404
QR (also listed as GRG 356T)
show description

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ANT 324L • Inca World

32475 • Covey, Ronald
Meets TTH 11:00AM-12:30PM WCP 4.174
GCWr (also listed as LAS 324L)
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When Francisco Pizarro led an expeditionary force into the Andean highlands in 1532, the Incas ruled the largest native empire to develop anywhere in the Americas.  The Incas ruled millions of subjects living across one of the most diverse regions of the planet, and they left behind impressive material remains that speak to their organizational and technological abilities.  This course will explore how Inca civilization developed, how the Incas grew from a small highland state into a mighty empire, and how a small number of Spaniards and their allies were able to bring the Inca dynasty to an end.  We will read accounts of the Incas written in the first years of Spanish colonial rule, and will also review the latest archaeological discoveries. 

Aims: Required readings, minilectures, and other required media are intended to help students prepare for discussion-based class meetings that address Andean diversity, the arc of Inca imperial development, and selected topics about Inca society. Students will learn about the development of social power and statecraft, and will be charged with developing themes about the Inca world that are of their own interest. Specific Learning Objectives: By the end of this course, students will:

• demonstrate knowledge and comprehension of key ideas surrounding the Incas by successfully responding to required discussion sections posted before class.

• develop an in-depth appreciation for the diversity of the Andean region—and of Inca administrative strategies—by organizing a class meeting and preparing an annotated bibliography on a particular provincial region.

• link themes of significance in the Inca world to areas of personal interest, by preparing a thematic class meeting and short paper based on a topic of the student’s choosing.


ANT 324L • Japanese Concepts Body/Self

32470 • Traphagan, John
Meets TTH 2:00PM-3:30PM BUR 228
show description

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ANT 324L • Mapping Indigenous Austin

32420 • Hobart, Hiilei
Meets TTH 11:00AM-12:30PM WCP 4.118
CD
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This co-taught seminar combines Indigenous history, settler colonial theory, and design practice in order to highlight the histories and presents of Indigenous Austin. Traditionally, the lands upon which the city of Austin sits has been, and still is, home to multiple Indigenous communities who have been subject to implicit and explicit processes of erasure. To counter a lack of public awareness, students in this course will collaboratively research and contribute to a ‘story map’ that contextualizes important locations, communities, and archives that reveal Austin as an Indigenous space. Course readings will support an ethical and decolonial practice of Public Anthropology, in which we will think through the politics of what constitutes publics, legibility, collaboration, accessibility, and translation; these readings will complement the hands-on research and production of a story map. Students will participate in weekly site visits to libraries and archives, design workshops and critiques, and writing sessions to produce an important educational tool for the general public.


ANT 324L • Musics Of India

32445 • Slawek, Stephen
Meets TTH 11:00AM-12:30PM MRH M3.114
GCWr (also listed as ANS 361)
show description

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ANT 324L • Nature, Society, & Adaptatn

32449 • Garrison, Thomas
Meets MW 2:30PM-4:00PM JES A207A
EWr
show description

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ANT 324L • Oral History Of Native Texas

32425 • Sturm, Circe
Meets TTH 11:00AM-12:30PM SZB 296
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Oral Histories of Indigenous Texas is one of two collectively taught undergraduate seminars that are part of "Mapping Indigenous Texas," a uniquely interdisciplinary project, wedding social science research methodology, rich media production, and the digital humanities. Housed in both Anthropology and Native American and Indigenous Studies, the goal is to collectively teach two digital humanities courses to be held simultaneously, with students interacting on a weekly basis. These team-taught seminars combine Indigenous history, settler colonial theory, social science research methodologies, and media design practice in order to highlight the historical and ongoing presence of Indigenous people in Texas. Although students in each class will be using different methods to engage in researching Indigenous Texas , this class, “Oral Histories of Indigenous Texas,” will require students to actively engage with oral historical methods with indigenous communities throughout the state. We also intend for the courses to be held at the same time, so that students can meet collectively for an hour or more each week. Course readings will support an ethical and decolonial practice of Public Anthropology, in which we will think through the politics of what constitutes publics, legibility, accessibility, and translation; these readings will complement the hands-on research and production of digital media content. Class participation includes regular visits with Indigenous elders, trips to libraries and archives, design workshops and critiques, and writing sessions to work on producing what we hope will be an important educational tool not only for the UT community but the broader general public. As a project-based class, students will work collaboratively and independently on digital content that documents and supports a greater public recognition of the Indigenous lives and histories throughout Texas. The process of conducting research, editing, and revising will be a rich learning opportunity for students. When writing for a public they will be challenged to think about the politics of what constitutes publics, legibility, and accessibility. They will learn, also, how to build an intellectual edifice that is larger and deeper than what appears publicly in the seemingly expansive but remarkably limited digital space. Equally important, they will spend much of the course gaining digital competency and learning about writing and design for digital media.


ANT 324L • Primitive Technology

32440 • Valdez, Fred
Meets M 3:00PM-6:00PM T5D 1.102
show description

Prehistoric technologies will review various technological developments from earliest prehistoric times into the recent past as an initial backdrop for this course. The development, process, and methods of stone tool making serves as one example. The control and use of fire, the processes of pottery making, aspects of lithic technology, leatherworking, etc. are all among the topics of lectures and discussions. This course intends as a primary interest to study the development, the construction, and the use of prehistoric pottery.  


ANT 324L • Science And Society

32430 • Reed, Denne
Meets TTH 12:30PM-2:00PM WCP 5.172
show description

Science has achieved high esteem in US society and is now synonymous with reliable and powerful systems of knowledge production. At the same time it is also associated with significant atrocities, and some of the most potent threats facing human society in the 20th and 21st centuries including scientific racialization of society, global climate change, and the advent of information technology leading to the widespread surveillance and threat of state sanctioned violence domestically and internationally. This course examines how society can benefit from scientific advances and at the same time mitigate the risks to society or portions thereof. The course reviews major scientific and technological advances from an ethical and social justice perspective to explore the various ways that science has been used to support or undermine human welfare and wellbeing. Throughout this course students will be encouraged to mindfully reflect on the basis for their beliefs, to share their beliefs conscientiously, and to explore questions from a variety of different vantage points and perspectives. Crucially this course is focused on a key question, “How can society avoid the threat of extinction and societal collapse in light of new challenges presented by rapid advances in science and technology?” The answer to this question is vitally important to scientists and nonscientists alike.


ANT 324L • Sex & Power In Afr Diaspora

32455 • Gill, Lyndon
Meets TTH 3:30PM-5:00PM GEA 127
CDGC (also listed as AFR 345F, WGS 340)
show description

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ANT 324L • Theories Of Archaeology

32450 • Franklin, Maria
Meets MW 10:00AM-11:30AM WCP 4.174
Wr
show description

This course is a senior seminar for students who are pursuing studies in archaeology, and satisfies the “theory” requirement for the Anthropology degree. It is a broad survey of the major theoretical trends that have shaped anthropological archaeology over time. As such it is a course on the history of archaeological thought that highlights the major debates and key issues that have influenced the ways in which we diversely claim to know what we know about the past.

Why a course on theories of archaeology? We tend to envision archaeology as the discovery of sites and the pursuit of artifacts since field excavations dominate its public persona in the media. Yet archaeologists actually spend more time dealing with the analyses of excavated materials and moving from data to interpretations or explanations of the past than we do digging. The various intellectual approaches that we take towards drawing conclusions, if even tentative ones, are influenced by the different perspectives we have of the relationship between the past and the present, what kinds of information or meaning we believe can be derived from the archaeological record, the questions we seek to answer, and indeed, how much of the past each of us posits is knowable. Thus, what we often refer to as “archaeological theory” is best stated in the plural since there are multiple and competing ways that archaeologists theorize archaeological remains in order to interpret past societies and lifeways. That is to say, there is not a single, proven “archaeological theory” widely accepted by all. Theories are intertwined with practice/methodologies and are what frames and drives our interpretations, or what serve as the basis for our generalizing explanations of the past. Rather than bemoan the discipline’s heterogeneity, it is hoped that students will come to appreciate its diversity and breadth.

While we will spend the majority of the semester addressing how archaeologists use theory to learn about past cultures and societies, we will also explore the politics of the discipline. That is, what role does archaeology play in the contemporary world with respect to urgent issues such as inequality and nationalism? Some of the topics that are now central in archaeology that will be addressed include professional ethics, social responsibility, working with the public, and Indigenous rights over their past.

A note on the format and workload of this course:

This course was designed to provide students with sufficient background knowledge of archaeological theories in order to prepare them for graduate studies in archaeology where the subject will be a core feature of the curriculum. Moreover, it will be taught mainly in the style of a graduate seminar, where student-led discussions are an integral part of the learning process. Thus, students will be expected to give careful consideration to the assigned readings in preparation for discussions. Please note that there is a relatively heavy reading load for this course, and that most of the readings are advanced and may be complicated (i.e., these are not introductory readings).


ANT 325G • Technoculture

32480 • Hartigan, John
Meets MW 1:00PM-2:30PM WCP 4.118
II
show description

This class examines the many technological mediums that saturate daily life, asking how they shape our selves and our interactions with others. We begin by dissecting attention—what do we focus on, for how long, and with what affects? Attention is more than a personal matter; it has many collective forms, as well as biological dimensions. We’ll think about how we value some forms of attention and deride others, depending on social contexts and cultural sensibilities. Then we’ll sift through the layers of technological mediation that alternately facilitate, channel, or diffract our abilities to attend to relationships, objects, and the world around us. With these patterns and tendencies established, we’ll turn to analyze how media systems and technological infrastructures intentionally organize and mine collective forms of attention—online, certainly, but increasingly in real-world settings. We will sample various ethnographic techniques and methods—digital and traditional—then try these out in developing brief analytical accounts of the cultures of technologies that permeate social worlds today. We’ll conclude with some reflections on how the human and the social are being actively redefined today. The aim of this class is to encourage new forms of intellectual engagement; no technological expertise is required.  


ANT 325U • Austin Jews Cvl Rights Era

32490 • Seriff, Suzanne
Meets TTH 12:30PM-2:00PM RLP 1.102
CDII (also listed as AMS 324J, J S 364)
show description

AustinJews in the Civil Rights Era asks the question: What role did Longhorn and Austin Jews play in the social changes of the 1960s and early 70sboth on campus and beyond?

Revolution was in the air on college campuses in the 1960s and early 70s UT included. De-­‐segregation sit-­‐ins, free love, anti-­‐war protests, feminism, flower power, counter-­‐culture were the (dis)order of the day. Were UT Jews allies or activists? Greeks or geeks? Feminists or Princesses?And what was the relationship between the campus and the wider Austin community? What about Austin’s Jewish merchants, bankers, lawyers, businessmen, synagogue leaders, and artist/entertainers? How were they involved in the movements for equity, justice and peace?Students will learn the art of oral history and digital storytelling to uncover the untold tales of Austin’s Jewish community in the Age of Aquarius.

In this course, we will examine a small piece of Austin’s historical development, thinking critically about how history is researched, written and presented to public audiences. With a focus on civil rights activism in the Austin Jewish community of the 1960s and ‘70s, we will document stories of inclusion in a multi-­‐media digital storytelling map that we hope will become a foundation for UT’s interdisciplinary and cross-­‐racial research on this era in Austin’s civil right’s history.


ANT 326L • Cultures In Contact

32495 • Covey, Ronald
Meets TTH 9:30AM-11:00AM JES A203A
CDWr (also listed as LAS 324L)
show description

"Cultures in Contact" is a multi-disciplinary course which combines Historical, Anthropological, Geographical and Literary analyses of the continuing "contact period" in the New World.  The issues addressed span the last 500+ years of cultural interaction in the Americas, looking especially at the processes of cultural interaction, competition, cooperation, and synthesis that have taken place among people from the Americas, Europe, Africa, and Asia.


ANT 346L • Primate Social Behavior

32505 • Lewis, Rebecca
Meets MWF 11:00AM-12:00PM WCP 5.172
show description

This course focuses on the study of primate social behavior. It explores the basic theoretical principles that guide primatologists.

Topics covered include: evolutionary theory, primate diversity, social and mating systems, sexual selection, life history, cooperation, competition, intelligence, communication, and human behavior.


ANT 346M • Comparative Primate Ecology

32510 • Lewis, Rebecca
Meets MWF 10:00AM-11:00AM WCP 5.172
show description

Comparative Primate Ecology will explore the following topics with respect to primates: population ecology, community ecology, feeding adaptations, foraging strategies, ranging behavior, and life history strategies.


ANT 366 • Anat/Bio Human Skeleton-Wb

32525 • Kappelman, John • Internet; Asynchronous
show description

This course introduces the student to an in-depth study of the human skeleton. Class sessions combine lecture and laboratory sessions and cover topics including developmental biology, functional morphology, and skeletal identification, with a special focus on the latter skill as it relates to forensics and archaeological studies. Students will also be introduced to new 3D imaging techniques for studying the skeleton. 

This class requires both intensive in-class and out-of-class preparation. Participants must be prepared to handle actual human osteological specimens and have a professional approach to this subject and the human remains. An interest in human skeletal identification is especially applicable to the fields of archeology, physical anthropology, health sciences, law, and law enforcement.


ANT 391 • Anthropology Of Self

32570 • Keeler, Ward
Meets F 9:00AM-12:00PM WCP 4.120
show description

The seminar will take the concept of the self as a culturally variable notion, and one with a history even within the West. So it is neither universally similar across the world, nor consistent through time in Western understandings.

 

One important question we will address is how anthropologists have engaged with attachment theory. Another is how issues of identity intersect with matters of race, gender, and sexuality. The implications of social media for the presentation and realization of self will round out the readings.

 

Among the authors whose names are likely to appear on the syllabus are Erving Goffman, Takeo Doi, Norbert Elias, James Baldwin, Clifford Geertz, Peter Stearns, Judith Butler, Michel Foucault, Pierre Bourdieu, Naomi Quinn, and Jeanette Mageo.

 

Requirements:

 

Each student is required to complete the assigned reading every week and to write a brief, one-paragraph or half-page comment or question on the reading. Students must submit two additional written assignments. The first, due mid-way through the semester, is a consideration of at least four of the readings we have discussed, with reference to each other. The second is either of the following: 1) a paper of ten to twenty pages on a topic of your choosing, but with evidence in the paper that the readings and discussion for this course have had some impact on your thinking; or 2) an annotated syllabus for an upper-division undergraduate course in your field that draws on ideas we have discussed.


ANT 391 • Ethnography: Critical Perspect

32580 • Canova, Paola
Meets W 2:00PM-5:00PM WCP 5.124
(also listed as LAS 391)
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The seminar is an exploration of the relationship between ethnography and theory from an

anthropological perspective, focusing on the ways in which social theory and methodology are

mutually productive. The course will critically reflect on the multiple ways in which scholars are

thinking and writing about contemporary social issues and people’s subjective experiences

drawing on questions such as how do we use data to think about theory and how do theoretical

frameworks shape ethnographic production. The class will draw on conceptual tools combined

with a close reading and analysis of ethnographic studies dealing with subjects such as gender,

the environment, economics, and human-non human relations among others to critically examine

themes such as power and knowledge production, the politics of ethnographic fieldwork,

positionality and representation, decolonizing methodologies, and experimental writing

approaches. Overall, this seminar seeks to stimulate student’s critical awareness of the complex

dynamics at play that shape the production of ethnographic knowledge.


ANT 391 • Indigenous Politics

32585 • Casumbal-Salazar, Iokepa
Meets M 1:00PM-4:00PM WCP 5.118
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Examines politics as relations of power in the context of Indigenous movements for life, land, and self-determination with particular attention to key concepts, prominent theories, research methodologies, and salient issues impacting Indigenous peoples across Turtle Island, Oceania, and beyond.


ANT 391 • Narratives Of Space

32590 • Merabet, Sofian
Meets T 11:00AM-2:00PM WCP 5.118
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This graduate seminar deals with the anthropological analysis of space, with a special emphasis on urban culture. It does not provide an inclusive overview over the extensive literature on the subject, but attempts at communicating important concepts and philosophies that are at the forefront of contemporary debates within the disciplines of Anthropology and Urban Studies. This includes the close reading of key texts written by such influential theorists like Gaston Bachelard, Henri Lefebvre and Michel de Certeau. Further, the material to be read will enable us to assess the impact of colonial policies on cities in geographical areas around the globe. Next to examining some of the major current debates in qualitative social science, the seminar will critically consider how the issues raised in class can be applied to the study of present-day cities in the US and abroad, especially in terms of differing understandings of what constitutes intimate and public space. 


ANT 391 • Pol Viol Pop Mov In Cent Amer

32595 • Cojti Ren, Iyaxel
Meets TH 9:00AM-12:00PM WCP 5.118
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This seminar addresses the issue of state and community violence, analyzing the relationship between questions of power, inequality, social and racial exclusion, and environmental destruction. Although countries in Central America have democratic governments, their peoples have experienced different forms of structural violence which are connected to macro processes such as state formation, neoliberal capitalism, and globalization. These processes have affected the lives of indigenous peoples, peasants, workers, and women since these phenomena are generally connected with the appropriation and privatization of local territories. This course will also address how Central Americans have struggled to create autonomous lives, control their resources, avoid privatization, and recover their culture. The main historical periods that are addressed in this course are the Republican period, Liberal Reform, the Cold War, and recent historical events. Each of these historical periods is studied through theoretical frameworks and case-studies with anthropological and sociological perspectives. 


ANT 392L • Biol Anthro: Morph/Evolution

32610 • Shapiro, Liza
Meets T 2:00PM-5:00PM WCP 5.118
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This course is part one of a two semester graduate core curriculum in biological anthropology. Topics covered will include the history of the field of biological anthropology, evolutionary theory, primate systematics, methods of phylogenetic reconstruction, primate diversity and anatomical adaptations, and the human and nonhuman primate fossil record.  The goal of the course is to provide an overview of the field, while allowing students to identify areas of research they might pursue at the master’s and doctoral levels.


ANT 392M • Intro To Grad Social Anthro

32615 • Peterson, Marina
Meets F 1:00PM-4:00PM WCP 5.118
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This course introduces doctoral students to major texts in sociocultural theory that have been central to the development of the discipline of anthropology from its colonial roots in North America and Western Europe to the contemporary period. While not a comprehensive history of anthropological theory, this course provides a chronological and contextualized perspective as it explores and interprets the relationships between varying and, at times, competing theoretical, epistemological, and ethical claims on anthropology and related disciplines. Based on classical scholarship by some of the “founding fathers” of modern social science, this course traces parts of the genealogical trajectories taken by the anthropological study of culture and society. Following that intellectual legacy, this course asks a central question: How can we make sense of sociocultural anthropology as an academic discipline today? Problematizing the role the concept of “culture” has played in shaping the idea of the “field,” we will look at “location” as a principal site of epistemological limitation and possibility for anthropological research.


ANT 393 • Persons-In-Culture

32625 • Webster, Anthony
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While much anthropology has been, at times and in various places, overly influenced by Durkheimian sociological perspectives which ignore or deny the importance of the individual in culture, there is also a tradition in anthropology that has sought to place persons-in-culture or individuals-in-culture (the formulation comes from Richard Preston’s Cree Narratives). This is an explicitly Americanist tradition; in that it emerges out of that particular constellation of interests that can be traced in and through Franz Boas. An early statement of such a perspective can be found in Edward Sapir’s famous ‘Why Cultural Anthropology Needs the Psychiatrist.’ This class will begin by looking at why some anthropologists rejected the Durkheimian approach and argued for a focus on life histories and the individual. Early examples of this approach, including the work of Zora Neale Hurston and Paul Radin, will be examined. The class will then turn to more recent articulations of the language-culture-society-individual nexus. Central to this will be topics such as the linguistic individual, lingual life histories, the ethnographic documenting of autobiographies, and ethnography as commentary. Rather than invoking a methodological individualism, this class places the individual within the culture-society-language nexus.




ANT 432L • Primate Anatomy

32500 • Shapiro, Liza
Meets TTH 11:00AM-12:30PM WCP 5.172
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An exploration of the relationship between primate anatomical form and function, with emphasis on adaptations to diet and locomotion.  The course is also designed to demonstrate how such information can be applied to the fossil record in order to reconstruct the evolutionary development of primate adaptations.

There is a two hour lab section associated with this class.


ANT 679HB • Honors Tutorial Course

32545
IIWr
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