Department of Anthropology

ANT 301 • Bio/Phys Anthropology

30460-30525 • Lewis, Rebecca
Meets MW 9:00AM-10:00AM JES A121A
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This course is an introduction to the principles and the methods of biological anthropology, the study of human beings from a biological perspective.  It is a field that seeks to explain our relationship to other primates and to the rest of the natural world.  In other words: Who are we? How are we unique? How, why, and when did we come to be the way that we are? The study of biological anthropology requires many different types of knowledge.  Throughout the course, we will examine anatomical, behavioral, and genetic similarities and differences among the living primates, learn the basic mechanisms of evolution, and trace the path of human evolution as reconstructed from the fossil record.  The main goal of the course is to obtain a clear understanding of our place in nature.


ANT 301 • Bio/Phys Anthropology-Honors

30530 • Kirk, Edward
Meets TTH 9:30AM-11:00AM SAC 5.172
show description

This course is an introduction to the principles and the methods of biological anthropology, the study of human beings from a biological perspective.  It is a field that seeks to explain our relationship to other primates and to the rest of the natural world.  In other words: Who are we? How are we unique? How, why, and when did we come to be the way that we are? The study of biological anthropology requires many different types of knowledge.  Throughout the course, we will examine anatomical, behavioral, and genetic similarities and differences among the living primates, learn the basic mechanisms of evolution, and trace the path of human evolution as reconstructed from the fossil record.  The main goal of the course is to obtain a clear understanding of our place in nature.


ANT 301 • Bio/Phys Anthropology-Wb

30535 • Kappelman, John
show description

This course is an introduction to the principles and the methods of biological anthropology, the study of human beings from a biological perspective.  It is a field that seeks to explain our relationship to other primates and to the rest of the natural world.  In other words: Who are we? How are we unique? How, why, and when did we come to be the way that we are? The study of biological anthropology requires many different types of knowledge.  Throughout the course, we will examine anatomical, behavioral, and genetic similarities and differences among the living primates, learn the basic mechanisms of evolution, and trace the path of human evolution as reconstructed from the fossil record.  The main goal of the course is to obtain a clear understanding of our place in nature.


ANT 302 • Cultural Anthropology

30540-30575 • Seriff, Suzanne
Meets MW 9:00AM-10:00AM ART 1.102
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This course focuses on "classic" themes in anthropology such as ethnicity, language, adaptation, marriage, kinship, gender, religion, and social stratification.  We will consider anthropological theory from its 19th-century origins to the present.  The course also explores the nature of ethnographic field work, especially the relationship between the anthropologist and the field community.  
The lectures, readings, and films for this course have been selected with the objective of exploring the social meanings with which diverse groups invest their life.  By comparing and analyzing the similarities and differences between "us" and "others," both within the borders of the U.S. and abroad, the anthropological perspective can expose some of our own cultural assumptions and enable us to better understand diverse cultures.


ANT 302 • Cultural Anthropology

30580-30615 • Slotta, James
Meets MW 11:00AM-12:00PM BEL 328
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This course provides an introduction to cultural anthropology, the inductive study of the human condition insofar as it is shaped by our social surround. To this end, anthropologists investigate humanity in all of its variety, developing methods of data collection and analysis, conceptual frameworks, and modes of presentation that are, ideally, adequate to capturing what it means to be human. In this course, we look at social formations both familiar (the nation, the nuclear family) and unfamiliar (the clan, the patrilocal residence group) alongside the cultural values and beliefs that motivate these social formations. We ask: where do values, beliefs, and identities “live”? What practices create, sustain, and transform these values and beliefs?

At the same time, we bring anthropological methods to bear on our own lives to examine how we are embedded in and influenced by social, political, historical and cultural environments in ways that we often do not realize. We challenge our own beliefs about the nature of humanity and society, about the moral and immoral, about the valuable and valueless through careful attention to the wide diversity of ways in which humans live. How do humans’ construct their socio-cultural environment? What becomes striking about our own social lives when set alongside the social life of others? What aspects of our socio-cultural surround are particularly potent in shaping the way we live?

The course aims 1) to develop students’ ability to approach social life as “ethnographers” – that is, to empathize with  people through careful attention to their social and cultural surround, and to recognize ourselves as part of particular social and cultural worlds; and 2) to develop the ability to read academic arguments—and anthropological arguments, in particular—that mobilize evidence and reasons in support of particular, “surprising” claims.


ANT 304 • Intro Archaeol Stds: Prehist

30620-30650 • Denbow, James
Meets MW 2:00PM-3:00PM BEL 328
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An introduction to archaeology as a discipline.  Three major themes that deal with issues of the past will be covered:

1.  A brief history of the discipline, changing theories about various aspects of the past, and the role that the reconstructions of the past play in national and/or group identities.

2.  A survey of the development of human culture from its beginnings to the rise of civilizations and proto-historical cultures in most areas of the world.  Prehistoric cultures, archaeological sites, and areas of Africa, the Americas, Asia, Europe , and the Pacific will be covered.

3.  Archaeological methods of recovery of information about the past.  Scientific procedures involved in excavation, dating, and preservation of the material record.


ANT 304 • Intro Archaeol Stds: Prehist

30655-30695 • Covey, Ronald
Meets TTH 3:30PM-4:30PM GAR 0.102
show description

An introduction to archaeology as a discipline.  Three major themes that deal with issues of the past will be covered:

1.  A brief history of the discipline, changing theories about various aspects of the past, and the role that the reconstructions of the past play in national and/or group identities.

2.  A survey of the development of human culture from its beginnings to the rise of civilizations and proto-historical cultures in most areas of the world.  Prehistoric cultures, archaeological sites, and areas of Africa, the Americas, Asia, Europe , and the Pacific will be covered.

3.  Archaeological methods of recovery of information about the past.  Scientific procedures involved in excavation, dating, and preservation of the material record.


ANT 305 • Expressive Culture

30700-30715 • Campbell, Craig
Meets TTH 2:00PM-3:00PM CLA 0.112
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The purpose of this course is to introduce the concept of culture as a crucial dimension of human life. Because we tend to think of thought and action as stemming from individual impulses, we find the notion of a shared, highly variable, but influential force in our lives hard to fathom.  Even if we speak of "society" as a familiar concept, we tend to make of it a uniform, oppressive force, some institution outside ourselves that we individually confront and oppose. Yet only if we can learn to recognize how deeply we share certain assumptions and inclinations with others--but only some others, and to varying degrees--can we appreciate the degree to which culture inheres within us and makes us who we are.


ANT 307 • Culture And Communication

30720 • Webster, Anthony
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The ability to learn and use language is a quintessentially human characteristic—one that distinguishes homo sapiens from other animal species. Language is simultaneously generated through and generative of social life; the former is a primary resource that we humans use in both the structuring and accomplishment of the latter. These dynamics form the subject of study of linguistic anthropology.

This course is an introduction to linguistic anthropology. It is impossible in a single semester to provide a complete overview of all topics that linguistic anthropologists address, so this course covers selected topics, the selection of which is aimed to illustrate how linguistic anthropologists go about doing their work: the range of topics they examine, the kinds of questions they ask, the types of approaches and methods they utilize, and the sorts of conclusions they reach.


ANT 307 • Culture And Communication-Hon

30725 • Slotta, James
Meets MW 1:00PM-2:30PM SAC 4.118
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Language is not only one of the quintessential attributes of “the human,” it plays a role in virtually everything we do. Yet we typically do not pay much attention to what it is that language does and how it does what it does. And when we do, language and its use in communication often appear lacking: it is disparaged as little more than an (imperfect) reflection of reality, as a medium incapable of adequately conveying thoughts, emotions, and experiences, or as a hollow activity devoid of significance (“all talk and no action”).

In this course, we look at language not as an inadequate version of some more fundamental reality, but as a medium that constitutes and mediates reality for us as cultural beings living and acting in a social environment. Here we concentrate on two broad areas of concern: 1) language as a medium of social action, through which humans create & transform themselves and the world around them and 2) language as a medium of conceptualization, which provides a privileged lens on (or even constitutes a part of) mind. Attempts to understand language as a reflection of cognition divorced from sociocultural life and attempts to understand social life as composed of non-conceptual, biological drives are equally limited from this perspective. The perspective on language developed here locates language squarely in culture and society and at the same time locates sociocultural life “in” language and communication.


ANT 310L • Aztecs And Spaniards

30745 • Rodriguez, Enrique
Meets TTH 12:30PM-2:00PM SAC 4.174
(also listed as LAS 315)
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The Aztec and the Spanish empires have attracted the attention of scholars and the

public for a long time with stories of gold, human sacrifice, warfare, and the meeting of two

different civilizations. In this class we will study both empires, taking advantage of the varied

lines of evidence available for their study, especially historical and archaeological evidence, as

well as monuments and works of art. The focus of the class will be on how imperial expansion

affected the daily life of people in the Aztec empire and after the Spanish conquest. In addition

to studying the daily life of different people in these empires, we will examine some of the

themes that have fascinated both scholars and the general public, including human sacrifice,

conquest warfare, and religion. The goal of the class is to examine social and cultural

heterogeneity in both of these empires, to familiarize students with the diverse lines of evidence

we have to study these empires, and to understand processes of historical change in these two

empires.

Prior experience in archaeology is not required


ANT 310L • Intro East Austin Ethnography

30734 • Adelakun, Abimbola
Meets MWF 11:00AM-12:00PM ETC 2.132
(also listed as AFR 317D, AMS 315)
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Description:

In this course, students will study ethnographic methods including observant participation, interviewing, and oral histories by conducting fieldwork in East Austin communities. Students will apply the techniques they learn toward an investigation of Black out-migration and gentrification in Austin. This course provides students with skills in critical ethnography by foregrounding the racial politics that shape community-building and city development.

 

Objectives: Upon completion of this course students should be able to differentiate between qualitative and quantitative research methodologies, conduct ethnographic interviews, maintain a fieldwork notebook, create survey research, conduct oral histories, and identify the major components of critical ethnography as a methodology.

 

Grading:

Preliminary Ethnographic Analysis          10

Fieldwork Notebook (I & II)                       20

Data Collection                                30

Ethnographic Summary                   20

2-Minute Essay (5/2 pts. each)      10

Participation                                     10


ANT 310L • Introduction To South Asia

30744 • Hyne-Sutherland, Amy
Meets MW 2:30PM-4:00PM BUR 130
(also listed as ANS 302K)
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This course introduces students to the histories, literature, religions, social organizations and stratifications, festivals, and material culture of the people of South Asia, with a primary focus on contemporary India, Nepal, Pakistan, Bangladesh and Sri Lanka. We start with the seemingly simple question “What is South Asia?” challenging ourselves from the outset to consider both the arbitrariness and the consequences of boundaries. In addition to studying various aspects of culture emerging from this region, students will learn to recognize their own biases and to view phenomena through various lenses. Course content will be drawn from primary sources in translation, scholarly literature, documentaries, newspapers, and online forums. Students write analyses of current events using multiple sources, present group research projects, and attend South Asia related talks/events on campus and in the community.


ANT 310L • Israel: Space/Place/Landscape

30735 • Weinreb, Amelia
Meets TTH 11:00AM-12:30PM MEZ 2.122
(also listed as J S 311, MES 310)
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This multidisciplinary, interactive seminar is designed to foster conversation and creative projects between students with interests in Jewish studies, Middle Eastern studies, anthropology, and cultural geography. Diverse accounts--ranging from critical spatial theory and landscape phenomenology, to histories of Zionist architecture and urban planning--expose students to the spectrum of perceptions and debates on Israel’s spatial forms from the Yishuv period to the present. Some of the questions we address throughout course are: How is culture spatialized? What is the relationship between landscape, culture and memory? How do various social actors in Israel experience public spaces, holy sites, monuments and borders? What do various spatial narratives and maps reveal, conceal, or distort? A core goal of the course is to understand course materials through active participation, an alternative to the standard lecture-and-exam format. With this goal in mind, group projects, in-class workshops and individual portfolios challenge students to illustrate not only what they have learned, but also how they can apply their newly acquired knowledge in a variety of formats. The course is designed to appeal to students who want to experience a collaborative learning environment, gain a set of multidisciplinary analytic skills, learn about social and geographical space in Israel, and interact with students who may have different disciplinary and political viewpoints.

Note: This course carries a Global Cultures Flag. Global Cultures courses are designed to increase your familiarity with cultural groups outside the United States. Therefore, your course assignments cover the practices, beliefs, and histories of a non-U.S. cultural group, past and present in this case, groups living in Israel.


ANT 310L • Mex Amer/Lat Folk Across US

30740 • Gonzalez-Martin, Rachel
Meets TTH 2:00PM-3:30PM CMA 5.190
show description

Please check back with updates.


ANT 322M • Mexican Immigratn Cul Hist

30750 • Menchaca, Martha
Meets MWF 11:00AM-12:00PM CLA 0.112
(also listed as LAS 324L, MAS 374)
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This course seeks to develop a student's understanding of the history of Mexican

immigration to the U.S. It will provide an overview of migratory patterns dating

back to the late pre-historic period through contemporary times. The focus of the

course, however, will be current immigration issues dealing with: 1) causes of

Mexican immigration: globalization, Mexican politics, agribusiness, 2) U.S. Law,

3) incorporation, and 4) citizenship.


ANT 324L • Anthropology Of Religion

30760 • Crosson, Jonathan
Meets TTH 5:00PM-6:30PM CLA 0.122
(also listed as LAS 324L, R S 373)
show description

Course Number: R S 373

Course Title: Anthropology of Religion

Semester / Year: Spring 2018

Cross-Listings: ANT, AFR, LAS

Description:

The anthropology of religion has been central to the disciplines of both cultural anthropology and religious studies. This course traces a genealogy of the anthropology of religion from the nineteenth century to the present. We will focus on some foundational theories and debates, before focusing on contemporary case studies. These case studies will include works on Islam in Europe, nationalism, Christianity in Indonesia, Afro-Caribbean religions, and third wave Pentecostals in the U.S.

Texts / Readings:

Sean McCloud. American Possessions: Fighting Demons in the Contemporary U.S. Mayanthi Fernando. The Republic Unsettled: Muslim French and the Contradictions of Secularism. Elizabeth Perez. Religion in the Kitchen: Cooking, Talking, and Making the Black Atlantic. Benedict Anderson. Imagined Communities. Evans-Pritchard. Witchcraft Among the Azande. Carla Freeman. Entrepreneurial Selves (excerpts)

Grading Policy:

Reading Quizzes 30% Reading Journals 30% Participation Exercises 30% Final 10%


ANT 324L • Archaeol Of African Thought

30820 • Denbow, James
Meets MWF 11:00AM-12:00PM SAC 4.174
(also listed as AFR 372G, ANT 380K)
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This course uses archaeological, anthropological and historical works to examine the development and transformation of African societies from the Neolithic through the slave trade and the beginning of the colonial period.  The course will discuss the historic and prehistoric foundations of contemporary African socieities south of the Sahara, focusing especially on equatorial and southern Africa.  The intention is to develop an understanding of the cultural dynamics of Bantu societies and traditions, and their transformations through time.  This provides an interpretive framework from which to examine emerging archaeological perspectives on the slave trade and its impact on the development of new traditions in the New World.  


ANT 324L • Black Women/Transnatl State

30765 • Smith, Christen
Meets MWF 12:00PM-1:00PM GEA 114
(also listed as AFR 372F, LAS 324L, WGS 340)
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This course surveys black women’s experiences living with and confronting state oppression around the world. From the United States to Brazil, black women experience similar patterns of political, social and economic inequality. Transnationally, racism, sexism, patriarchy, homophobia, and classism affect the quality of life of black women, particularly within nation-states with legacies of slavery and colonialism. This course takes an historical, social and theoretical look at the roots of this inequality and how black women have chosen to respond to it locally and globally. How have interlocking forms of oppression affected black women’s citizenship within the modern nation-state? How have black women, in turn, sought to organize themselves in response to this oppression?

Objectives

1) To think critically about the multiple forms of oppression that affect black women’s lives globally;

2) To consider how black women’s political identity has been defined by experiences with oppression transnationally;

3) To define and articulate black women’s agency in response to oppression

Key Topics: Racism, sexism, patriarchy, homophobia, classism, transnationalism, representation, agency, black feminism.


ANT 324L • Blacks/Asians: Race/Soc Movmnt

30767 • Bhalodia-Dhanani, Aarti
Meets TTH 12:30PM-2:00PM JES A217A
(also listed as AAS 330, AFR 374D)
show description

Flag: Cultural Diversity in the U.S.

Asian Americans are the fastest-growing racial group in the United States making up 6% of the American population. With Asians now making up the largest share of recent immigrants it is important to study the Asian American experience, including Asian interactions with other minority groups. While a majority of Asians are immigrants, people from Asia have a long history in US. The course begins with an overview of Asian and Black history in the US through the lens of critical race theory. We will trace the historical roots of Asian and Black relations in the US and examine past and present racialization of Asian Americans and African Americans. We will examine key points of collaboration and conflict between Asians and Blacks in US history.  

Texts:

Vijay Prashad, Everybody was Kung Fu Fighting: Afro-Asian Connections and the Myth of Cultural Purity
 
Gary Y. Okihiro, Margins and Mainstreams: Asians in American History and Culture
 
Fred Ho and Bill V. Mullen edited Afro Asia: revolutionary political and cultural connections between African Americans and Asian Americans
 
Nitasha Tamar Sharma, Hip Hop Desis: South Asian Americans, Blackness and Global Race Consciousness

Grades:

Attendance: 5%
Class Participation: 15%
Exam 1: 25%
Exam 2: 25%
Research paper topic and bibliography: 5%
Research paper: 25%


ANT 324L • Bronze/Iron Age Atlntc Eur

30835 • Wade, Maria
Meets MWF 1:00PM-2:00PM SAC 4.174
show description

 This course surveys European prehistory and early history emphasizing the archeological connections between all geographic and cultural regions of Europe. The course focuses on the archaeological cultures of the 1) Eastern, Central and Western Mediterranean and 2) on those of Atlantic Europe.

Course objectives/expectations: Students will have a comprehensive regional understanding of European prehistoric and early historic cultural and

archeological similarities and differences.

Students will demonstrate their understanding through: 1) geographic knowledge, 2) human/landscape adaptations for specific cultural and archaeological periods, and 3) trade relationships between the different regions.


ANT 324L • Community & Social Devel-Gha

30770 • Jones, Omi
(also listed as AFR 374C, AFR 387D, T D 357T, T D 387D, WGS 340)
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In this course, students will participate in social change strategies that Ghanaians employ to strengthen their individual lives, their communities, and their environment.  These strategies include the work of non-governmental organizations (NGOs), art for social justice, and social service agencies.  The course involves both experiential and classroom learning, with an international-based service learning component that intentionally integrates community service, theatre for social change, academic learning, and civic engagement. This course is offered alongside Texas State University’s “Ghana:  Human Rights and Social Justice Applied” which expands the opportunities for learning from a wide range of faculty and fellow students. During the course, students will work with various non-governmental organizations, arts organizations, social service agencies, schools, and/or community-based organizations to implement small-scale community and/or art projects that will: 1) enhance student learning, 2) meet small-scale community needs and 3) allow students to critically reflect upon their entire study-abroad experience. 


ANT 324L • Culture And Health

30772 • Strong, Pauline
Meets MWF 11:00AM-12:00PM SAC 4.118
show description

This course considers the historical, social, political, economic, and cultural foundations of Western Medicine, and introduces students to alternative health systems. The course also considers the linkage between modern medicine and the construction of modern subjectivity and personhood, and analyzes local and global health disparities based on social, political, and economic inequalities. Readings will include theoretical, historical, and ethnographis texts.

 


ANT 324L • Cultures Of Southeast Asia

30805 • Keeler, Ward
Meets TTH 9:30AM-11:00AM SAC 4.118
show description

The course aims to provide a general introduction to important themes in the anthropological literature on Southeast Asia. This semester the course will focus on the three countries, Vietnam, Laos, and Cambodia, all of which were colonized by the French and which suffered the most from the depradations of the anti-colonial wars of the mid-twentieth century. Students with prior coursework in anthropology, especially Introductory Cultural Anthropology, will be at some advantage, although coursework in anthropology is not a prerequisite for this course. However, upperclass standing is required. Students who have registered for the course but do not have upperclass standing will not be permitted to remain once the semester starts.


ANT 324L • Digital Dat Sys In Archaeol

30830 • Jarvis, Jonathan
Meets W 3:00PM-6:00PM T5D 1.102
show description

This course provides the basic knowledge and skills needed to operate digital equipment (e.g., GPS and Total Data Stations) commonly used for collecting location data on archaeological sites. Classroom instruction on mapping and grid systems will be translated into "hands-on" instrument operation in simulated archaeological field conditions. An introduction to GIS software and its applications in archaeology will be provided. Data collected during simulated field operations will be processed and mapped using GIS software. An overview of near-surface sensing techniques, including a field demonstration with a magnetometer, will be included.


ANT 324L • Ethnographic Writing

30825 • Stewart, Kathleen
Meets TH 3:00PM-6:00PM SAC 5.118
show description

This is a writing workshop. Students will keep free-writing journals and write four essays, each of which

will be built through 4 drafts. We will read one another’s writings and give useful comments. In class we

will proceed through a series of exercises and workshops in doing ethnography, writing and reading. We

will experiment with how to writing about objects, places, scenes and situations, characters, forms of

attention, and sensibilities.


ANT 324L • Extraterrestrials: Cul/Rlg

30840 • Traphagan, John
Meets TTH 11:00AM-12:30PM GEA 127
show description

Please check back for updates.


ANT 324L • Globalization In Latin Amer

30775 • Canova, Paola
Meets TTH 11:00AM-12:30PM SRH 1.320
(also listed as LAS 324L)
show description

This seminar critically examines globalization from an economic perspective in contemporary Latin America.  It combines theoretical approaches with ethnographic work to explore how global flows of capital, people, commodities, media, and ideologies are shaping the region and different groups of people at the local level.  Among the questions that this course addresses are: Is globalization a new phenomenon? How does it shape relations with other parts of the world? What are the roles of multinational corporations and multilateral institutions such as the World Bank and International Monetary Fund in economic globalization? How do people mediate processes of globalization in culturally specific ways? How does globalization shape inequlities? Themes that will be explored include main debates and critiques of globalization, historical backgrounds; political economies; cultural aspects; and ecological dimensions.


ANT 324L • Inca World

30780 • Covey, Ronald
Meets TTH 2:00PM-3:30PM SAC 4.174
(also listed as LAS 324L)
show description

When Francisco Pizarro led an expeditionary force into the Andean highlands in

1532, the Incas ruled the largest native empire to develop anywhere in the Americas. The Incas

ruled millions of subjects living across one of the most diverse regions of the planet, and they left

behind impressive material remains that speak to their organizational and technological abilities.

This course will explore how Inca civilization developed, how the Incas grew from a small

highland state into a mighty empire, and how a small number of Spaniards and their allies were

able to bring the Inca dynasty to an end. We will read accounts of the Incas written in the first

years of Spanish colonial rule, and will also review the latest archaeological discoveries.


ANT 324L • Intro Ethnograph Method-L A

30784 • Jones, Omi
(also listed as AFR 372E)
show description

Please check back for updates.


ANT 324L • Maya Art And Architecture-Gua

30785 • Runggaldier, Astrid
show description

Please check back for updates.


ANT 324L • Nature, Society, & Adaptatn

30810 • Knapp, Gregory
Meets TTH 11:00AM-12:30PM CLA 2.706
(also listed as GRG 331K)
show description

This course examines the very long-term human trajectory in gaining control over resources, impacting the environment, and transforming planet earth into a meaningful human home. This trajectory has been related to long-term changes in human integration (reciprocity, trade, and redistribution) at a variety of scales, culminating in recent globalization. These changes have been associated with great achievements in quality of life for some, but with attendant problems of violence, impoverishment, and environmental impacts including, in some extreme cases, collapse.  These challenges implicate both culture (learned habitual behavior, concepts, and associated objects and landscapes) and ethics (socially oriented decisions) as they promote or fail to promote resilience and adaptation with respect for human rights.

 

The course will discuss major transformations: the origins of the human species, the domestication of plants and animals, the rise of agricultural societies and urban civilizations, global mercantile colonialism, and modernization and urbanization. Attention will be paid to the theories and works of geographers, ecological anthropologists, environmental historians, and others.  Lectures and student-proctored discussions examine selected strategies employed by humans to cope with the challenges and take advantage of the opportunities presented by different natural environments, with special attention to foraging, food, and farming.  The course will also provide an introduction to ethical and policy issues surrounding sustainable development and alternative futures.  Grading is based on attendance and participation, numerous writing assignments, oral presentations, and proctoring.

 

The course has a Writing Flag and an Ethics and Leadership Flag. It can be used to meet the core requirements for the Sustainability or the Cultural Geography tracks in the Geography major, and the upper division course requirements in the Anthropology major. It also can be used for the International Relations and Global Studies Major.

download syllabus


ANT 324L • Science And Art In Archaeology

30795 • Valdez, Fred
Meets W 4:00PM-7:00PM CLA 1.108
show description

The "Science and Art in Archaeology" course covers aspects of archaeological endeavor in a detailed and informed manner not often available for most classes. The course covers basic information on selected topics (such as bio-archaeology, geo-archaeology, paleoethnobotany, material culture analysis, archaeological cinema & commercials, among others), but will supplement lectures with films, guest speakers (who are the field specialists), and hands-on activities. As an example, in a lecture/meeting for bio-archaeology there will be discussions of field techniques in excavating burials/skeletons as well as having a "bio-archaeologist" come in & present on his/her work. If possible, I'd also have a related film to provide a more diverse perspective on bio-archaeology and its potential. The best & most effective way of conveying the various parameters of bio-archaeology is in a continuous (perhaps long) class meeting (including examining bones directly).


ANT 324L • Sex & Power In Afr Diaspora

30824 • Gill, Lyndon
Meets TTH 9:30AM-11:00AM CLA 1.102
(also listed as AFR 372G, WGS 340)
show description

Exploration of various experiences and theories of sex, intimacy, and desire alongside intellectual and artistic engagements with power hierarchies and spirituality across transnational black communities. Subjects include the concept of "erotic subjectivity" from various theoretical and methodological angles, principally within African diasporic contexts.


ANT 324L • Shamanism & The Primitive

30790 • Roberts, Jason
Meets TTH 12:30PM-2:00PM CLA 0.118
(also listed as ANS 340, R S 352, REE 345)
show description

Course Number: R S 342 Course Title: Shamans and the Idea of Shamanism Semester / Year: Spring 2018 Instructor & Rank: Jason Parker-Roberts, Lecturer Cross Listings: ANT, REE, ANS • Upper division course, small seminar format, ideally MW or TTh • Religious Studies course, cross-lists with Slavic Studies, anthropology, (Asian Studies is of secondary interest if only 3 cross-listings are possible.) • Course level flag through Slavic Studies: world culture All over the world, we find people who are called (and who call themselves) “shamans.” But what does the term really tell us about the people to whom it is applied? The word itself probably originates from the Tungusic Evenki language of North Asia, and may have already been in use for more than a millennium when it was introduced to the West after Russian forces conquered the shamanistic Khanate of Kazan in 1552. Yet in anthropology and the study of religion – let alone in popular culture – the use of the word “shaman” extends well beyond the Tungusic Siberian context from which it was borrowed. It has assumed the form and function of a universal category even as it has come to refer to people whose beliefs, practices, and even appearances are wildly varied. So, what makes a shaman a shaman? And what, moreover, is “shamanism?” This upper division course uses anthropological as well as historical literature focusing on shamans and shamanism in Central Asia to examine such beliefs and practices as three-worlds symbolism, divination, spirit helpers, drumming, chanting, dancing, hallucinogens, trance, and soul retrieval. However, it also examines the ways in which various theories of shamanism constitute and appropriate the exotic in a variety of broadly construed religious settings – the ways in which westerners, from missionaries to social scientists, have viewed the beliefs and practices of the shaman as an “ism” analogous to a religion even when that is not necessarily the case. Students of this course will learn to identify the major theories of “shamanism” along with the inherent biases of those theories in order to better read accounts of shamans and “shamanism” (from historical to modern, anthropological to popular) against the grain and discern when collected data reveals as much about the observers as it does about the shamans they observe.


ANT 324L • Sounds Of The City

30799 • Peterson, Marina
Meets TTH 12:30PM-2:00PM SAC 4.118
show description

The city resounds with traffic and laughter, birds and airplanes, the nightclub and its revelers, the stillness of wind rustling leaves. In this course we will listen to the city through sensory investigations that attend to the physicality of perception and sound – to that which is audible and beyond. Austin will serve as our site of sonic investigation for an urban “acoustemology” (Feld) that explores the significance of sound for urban social life. Topics to be addressed include musical cultures, protest sound, noise ordinances and gentrification, architectural acoustics, and energy, environment and infrastructure. Sonic methodologies will focus on ethnographic approaches to sound and listening, soundwalks, basic field recording techniques, and the study of sonic archives. Along with class listening fieldtrips, students will conduct their own sonic ethnographies throughout the course of the semester.


ANT 324L • Veiling In The Muslim World

30800 • Shirazi, Faegheh
Meets TTH 3:30PM-5:00PM PAR 101
(also listed as ANS 372, ISL 372, MEL 321, R S 358, SOC 321K, WGS 340)
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Description:

This course will deal with the cultural significance and historical practices of veiling, “Hijab”, in the Muslim world. The issue of veiling as it relates to women has been subject to different interpretations and viewed from various perspectives, and with recent political developments and the resurgence of Islam, the debate over it and over women’s roles in Muslim countries has taken various shapes.  A number of Muslim countries are going back to their Islamic traditions and implementing a code of behavior that involves some form of veiling in Public /or segregation to various degrees for women. In some Muslim nations women are re-veiling on their own. In others, women resist the enforcement of such practices. We will examine the various perspectives, interpretations and practices relating to Hijab in the Muslim world with respect to politics, religion, feminism, culture, new wave of women converts and the phenomenon of “Islamic fashion” as a marketing tool.    

 Texts

 Reader Packet.

Will be announced where the Packet is sold

 Book:

Faegheh Shirazi. The Veil Unveiled: Hijab in Modern Culture. University Press of Florida, 2001, and 2003

Grading:

Active participation (assigned article with discussion questions/ is a group activity) 10%

Regular Class Attendance 5%

3 quizzes (Lowest grade will be dropped) 20%

Midterm Exam 30%

Final Research Paper (20%), and Oral Presentation %15 (This is a group activity)

 

 


ANT 325J • The Photographic Image

30845-30850 • Campbell, Craig
Meets T 12:00PM-2:00PM SAC 5.118
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"The Photographic Image" applies concepts and practices from visual ethnography to the study of memory, place, and everyday life. The course aims at developing counter-intuitive and subversive approaches to practices of looking and techniques of representation. Whereas photographs are often taken to be static representations of the world, we will invert this idea and explore how images can be transient and ephemeral by focusing not only on how to produce images but how they are 'read' by others.

 

The class is planned around multiple photo-based projects. You will be required to read for these projects and undertake original photography assignments. At all points in the course students are drawn into the use of image-making as an interpretive and critical engagement with course readings. We will begin with techniques of visual inquiry established by visual anthropologists, documentarians, and artists working on the margins of documentary traditions. Students are expected to engage fully in both individual and group activities. Students are expected to have at their disposal a camera (digital or analogue).


ANT 325L • Cultrl Heritage On Display

30865 • Seriff, Suzanne
Meets MWF 10:00AM-11:00AM SAC 4.118
(also listed as AMS 321)
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This course is designed to take you behind the scenes in the public construction, negotiation, and display of “American culture” by focusing on a number of cultural heritage sites in the public sphere. In particular, the course will examine fairs, festivals, theme parks, history sites, and museum exhibitions as contested sites of heritage production in American history—focusing especially on those moments when defining and displaying an image or event in American history becomes an active agent in the process of nation building and ideological construction. We will focus closely on the histories and agencies of specific “exhibitionary complexes,” paying close attention to what one critic calls ‘the problematic relationship of their objects to the instruments of their display.” (Barbara Kirshenblatt-Gimblett). Each student will have the opportunity to participate directly in creating and/or critiquing a cultural heritage site (including its methods of production, documentation, and display). Students will have an opportunity to conduct original field research, plan, design and critique a mock exhibit, heritage site or theme park, and critically analyze an historic example of cultural heritage production. 


ANT 325L • Cultures Of Sustainability

30855 • Hartigan, John
Meets TTH 11:00AM-12:30PM SAC 4.118
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This course guides students in recognizing how ecological concerns are articulated and perceived in different cultural contexts. Environmentalists in the U.S. and Europe often face challenges both in convincing peoples around the world to participate in conservation projects and in recognizing local, situated (particularly indigenous) forms of caring about ecological health and social equity. Notions of “nature” are fundamentally culture-bound, entangled with concepts of personhood and agency, power and risk, and cosmological orderings of humans and nonhumans. Beginning with an explanation of culture and its dynamics, this course will survey ecological activities in a range of settings (China, Indonesia, Brazil, and Europe), providing students a comparative framework for recognizing the criteria mobilized as people assess whether or how their environments are in peril. The analytical foundation is anthropological, emphasizing biocultural perspectives and recent work in cultural ecology, but the course will encourage interdisciplinary formulations of student research projects. Some of our case-studies will draw from science and technology studies, and students will be assisted in developing proposals that tap and mobilize various forms of expertise and knowledge claims. We will also spend time considering disciplinary debates over the Anthropocene (how to understand its dimensions and consequences) and sampling the exciting new development of “multispecies ethnography” (projects that analyze nonhumans’ roles in social and political formations).  


ANT 325L • Jewish Cuba

30860 • Weinreb, Amelia
Meets TTH 12:30PM-2:00PM PAR 103
(also listed as J S 365, LAS 324L, R S 366)
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Cuba has a small Jewish community (between 1,000-1,500) whose origins are presumed to date back to 1492. By some accounts, the contemporary community is dying, and by others, it is vibrant. No matter the assessment, it is a community that has been written about and analyzed disproportionately for its size. As noted Cuban-American Jewish anthropologist Ruth Behar has proposed, Jewish Cuba presents the challenge of focusing on a small community to understand large philosophical and cultural issues: Diaspora, preserving identity in hybridized social worlds, and the concept of home. In learning about Jewish Cuba, students of are not only exposed to a nationally-specific case study in Jewish Latin America, but have the opportunity to study the relationship between state politics and Jewish life, Judaism under communist regimes, religious and linguistic revitalization movements, migration, and cultural survival. To explore these themes and concepts, this course uses scholarly texts and ethnographic accounts, but also personal memoirs, films, photographs, and documentaries about Jewish Cuba.

Core questions we address in the course are: What is Home? What is Diaspora? What is Revolution?  How do we write about it?


ANT 340C • Ethnographic Research Methods

30880 • Sturm, Circe
Meets T 2:00PM-5:00PM SAC 4.118
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Understanding human behavior is immensely challenging. Fortunately, there are tools

to help us make sense of social, cultural and political complexity. This course offers an

introduction to the various methods and techniques used in conducting ethnographic

research such as participant observation, interviewing, collecting life histories and

genealogies, archival research, working with material culture, social media-based

research, and visual ethnography. Our primary objectives will be to explore research

design, what constitutes evidence, how to analyze data, and strategies for writing up

and presenting results. We will pay particular attention to the ethical considerations

entailed in anthropological research, including questions of knowledge production,

power, location, experience, translation and representation. The course is run largely as

a “hands–on” workshop, in which students practice a variety of ethnographic methods

(both inside and outside of class), engage in ethnographic writing exercises, and actively

guide one another’s work. Students will apply what they learn during the course to

designing their own ethnographic research project, conducting independent field

research, and presenting their findings to the class. By the end of the semester, they will

have a firm grounding in ethnographic research methods and be better prepared for

more advanced work.


ANT 348 • Human Origins And Evolution

30885-30900 • Kappelman, John
Meets MW 10:00AM-11:00AM SAC 5.172
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This course examines the evidence for the origin and evolution of humans with particular emphasis placed on reconstructing the paleobiology of extinct hominins.  Lectures will draw upon a diverse range of disciplines (anatomy, archaeology, ecology, ethology, genetics, geology, paleontology) and integrate these into a framework for understanding the origin and evolutionary history of this unusual group of primates.  Weekly laboratories provide the student with an opportunity to examine firsthand the fossil evidence for human evolution.


ANT 349C • Human Variation

30905-30915 • Bolnick, Deborah
Meets MW 10:00AM-11:00AM CLA 1.106
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This course surveys the patterns of biological variation within and between human populations.  We will examine physical, genetic, and behavioral traits, and consider both the microevolutionary and cultural processes that influence those traits.  We will also discuss how studies of human variation have impacted society in the past and present.  Topics include:  an overview of the principles of genetics and evolution, race, sex differences, human variability in behavior, eugenics and contemporary genetic issues, human plasticity, and disease.


ANT 351E • Primate Evolution

30920 • Shapiro, Liza
Meets TTH 11:00AM-12:30PM SAC 5.172
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This course is an examination of the fossil record for (nonhuman) primate evolution.  The fossil record will be examined after a basic grounding in the anatomy, ecology, and systematics of living primates.  Each of the major radiations of fossil primates will be explored with respect to adaptive diversity, functional morphology, and systematics.


ANT 366 • Anat And Bio Of Human Skeleton

30925 • Kirk, Edward
Meets TTH 12:30PM-1:00PM SAC 5.172
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This course introduces the student to an in-depth study of the human skeleton. Class sessions combine lecture and laboratory sessions and cover topics including developmental biology, functional morphology, and skeletal identification, with a special focus on the latter skill as it relates to forensics and archaeological studies. Students will also be introduced to new 3D imaging techniques for studying the skeleton. 

This class requires both intensive in-class and out-of-class preparation. Participants must be prepared to handle actual human osteological specimens and have a professional approach to this subject and the human remains. An interest in human skeletal identification is especially applicable to the fields of archeology, physical anthropology, health sciences, law, and law enforcement.


ANT 366 • Anat/Bio Human Skeleton-Wb

30930 • Kappelman, John
show description

This course introduces the student to an in-depth study of the human skeleton. Class sessions combine lecture and laboratory sessions and cover topics including developmental biology, functional morphology, and skeletal identification, with a special focus on the latter skill as it relates to forensics and archaeological studies. Students will also be introduced to new 3D imaging techniques for studying the skeleton. 

This class requires both intensive in-class and out-of-class preparation. Participants must be prepared to handle actual human osteological specimens and have a professional approach to this subject and the human remains. An interest in human skeletal identification is especially applicable to the fields of archeology, physical anthropology, health sciences, law, and law enforcement.