Department of Anthropology

ANT 301 • Biological Anthropology

30780-30845 • Kirk, Edward
Meets TTH 2:00PM-3:00PM ART 1.102
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This course is an introduction to the principles and the methods of biological anthropology, the study of human beings from a biological perspective.  It is a field that seeks to explain our relationship to other primates and to the rest of the natural world.  In other words: Who are we? How are we unique? How, why, and when did we come to be the way that we are? The study of biological anthropology requires many different types of knowledge.  Throughout the course, we will examine anatomical, behavioral, and genetic similarities and differences among the living primates, learn the basic mechanisms of evolution, and trace the path of human evolution as reconstructed from the fossil record.  The main goal of the course is to obtain a clear understanding of our place in nature.


ANT 301 • Biological Anthropology-Honors

30850 • Reed, Denne
Meets TTH 12:30PM-2:00PM SAC 5.172
show description

This course is an introduction to the principles and the methods of biological anthropology, the study of human beings from a biological perspective.  It is a field that seeks to explain our relationship to other primates and to the rest of the natural world.  In other words: Who are we? How are we unique? How, why, and when did we come to be the way that we are? The study of biological anthropology requires many different types of knowledge.  Throughout the course, we will examine anatomical, behavioral, and genetic similarities and differences among the living primates, learn the basic mechanisms of evolution, and trace the path of human evolution as reconstructed from the fossil record.  The main goal of the course is to obtain a clear understanding of our place in nature.


ANT 301 • Biological Anthropology-Wb

30855 • Kappelman, John
show description

This course is an introduction to the principles and the methods of biological anthropology, the study of human beings from a biological perspective.  It is a field that seeks to explain our relationship to other primates and to the rest of the natural world.  In other words: Who are we? How are we unique? How, why, and when did we come to be the way that we are? The study of biological anthropology requires many different types of knowledge.  Throughout the course, we will examine anatomical, behavioral, and genetic similarities and differences among the living primates, learn the basic mechanisms of evolution, and trace the path of human evolution as reconstructed from the fossil record.  The main goal of the course is to obtain a clear understanding of our place in nature.


ANT 302 • Cultural Anthropology

30860-30885 • Hartigan, John
Meets MW 9:00AM-10:00AM FAC 21
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This course focuses on "classic" themes in anthropology such as ethnicity, language, adaptation, marriage, kinship, gender, religion, and social stratification.  We will consider anthropological theory from its 19th-century origins to the present.  The course also explores the nature of ethnographic field work, especially the relationship between the anthropologist and the field community.  
The lectures, readings, and films for this course have been selected with the objective of exploring the social meanings with which diverse groups invest their life.  By comparing and analyzing the similarities and differences between "us" and "others," both within the borders of the U.S. and abroad, the anthropological perspective can expose some of our own cultural assumptions and enable us to better understand diverse cultures.


ANT 302 • Cultural Anthropology

30890-30915 • Slotta, James
Meets TTH 2:00PM-3:00PM GAR 0.102
show description

This course focuses on "classic" themes in anthropology such as ethnicity, language, adaptation, marriage, kinship, gender, religion, and social stratification.  We will consider anthropological theory from its 19th-century origins to the present.  The course also explores the nature of ethnographic field work, especially the relationship between the anthropologist and the field community.  
The lectures, readings, and films for this course have been selected with the objective of exploring the social meanings with which diverse groups invest their life.  By comparing and analyzing the similarities and differences between "us" and "others," both within the borders of the U.S. and abroad, the anthropological perspective can expose some of our own cultural assumptions and enable us to better understand diverse cultures.


ANT 302 • Cultural Anthropology-Wb

30920 • Sturm, Circe
show description

This course focuses on "classic" themes in anthropology such as ethnicity, language, adaptation, marriage, kinship, gender, religion, and social stratification.  We will consider anthropological theory from its 19th-century origins to the present.  The course also explores the nature of ethnographic field work, especially the relationship between the anthropologist and the field community.  
The lectures, readings, and films for this course have been selected with the objective of exploring the social meanings with which diverse groups invest their life.  By comparing and analyzing the similarities and differences between "us" and "others," both within the borders of the U.S. and abroad, the anthropological perspective can expose some of our own cultural assumptions and enable us to better understand diverse cultures.


ANT 304 • Intro Archaeol Stds: Prehist

30945-30985 • Valdez, Fred
Meets MW 9:00AM-10:00AM ART 1.102
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An introduction to archaeology as a discipline.  Three major themes that deal with issues of the past will be covered:

1.  A brief history of the discipline, changing theories about various aspects of the past, and the role that the reconstructions of the past play in national and/or group identities.

2.  A survey of the development of human culture from its beginnings to the rise of civilizations and proto-historical cultures in most areas of the world.  Prehistoric cultures, archaeological sites, and areas of Africa, the Americas, Asia, Europe , and the Pacific will be covered.

3.  Archaeological methods of recovery of information about the past.  Scientific procedures involved in excavation, dating, and preservation of the material record.


ANT 304 • Intro Archaeol Stds: Prehist

30925-30940 • Covey, Ronald
Meets TTH 8:30AM-9:30AM RLP 0.102
show description

An introduction to archaeology as a discipline.  Three major themes that deal with issues of the past will be covered:

1.  A brief history of the discipline, changing theories about various aspects of the past, and the role that the reconstructions of the past play in national and/or group identities.

2.  A survey of the development of human culture from its beginnings to the rise of civilizations and proto-historical cultures in most areas of the world.  Prehistoric cultures, archaeological sites, and areas of Africa, the Americas, Asia, Europe , and the Pacific will be covered.

3.  Archaeological methods of recovery of information about the past.  Scientific procedures involved in excavation, dating, and preservation of the material record.


ANT 304T • Intro To Texas Archaeology-Wb

30990 • Wade, Maria
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People have been in Texas since about 12,000 years ago and the evidence of their presence throughout time is fascinating.  Ever wondered how we know and can prove that? This course introduces students to Texas archaeology through lectures, interactive virtual labs and hands-on laboratory sections that emphasize experimentation. Texas geographic and environmental diversity provided prehistoric and historic peoples with unique resources and possibilities, and people used that diversity to make choices and develop specific cultural characteristics while interacting with other peoples from the surrounding regions.

Doing archaeology requires teamwork, critical thinking and multidisciplinary approaches. In archaeology, it is often more important to ask relevant questions than provide ready answers. The lectures and labs in this course aim to emphasize these requirements as well as how archaeology relates to other sciences.

This course may be used to fulfill the natural science and technology (Part II) component of the common core curriculum and addresses the following four core objectives established by the Texas Higher Education Coordinating Board: communication skills, critical thinking skills, teamwork, and empirical and quantitative skills.


ANT 305 • Expressive Culture

31005-31010 • Keeler, Ward
Meets MW 11:00AM-12:00PM RLP 0.112
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The purpose of this course is to introduce the concept of culture as a crucial dimension of human life. Because we tend to think of thought and action as stemming from individual impulses, we find the notion of a shared, highly variable, but influential force in our lives hard to fathom.  Even if we speak of "society" as a familiar concept, we tend to make of it a uniform, oppressive force, some institution outside ourselves that we individually confront and oppose. Yet only if we can learn to recognize how deeply we share certain assumptions and inclinations with others--but only some others, and to varying degrees--can we appreciate the degree to which culture inheres within us and makes us who we are.


ANT 307 • Culture And Communication

31015-31040 • Keating, Elizabeth
Meets MW 2:00PM-3:00PM GSB 2.124
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The ability to learn and use language is a quintessentially human characteristic—one that distinguishes homo sapiens from other animal species. Language is simultaneously generated through and generative of social life; the former is a primary resource that we humans use in both the structuring and accomplishment of the latter. These dynamics form the subject of study of linguistic anthropology.

This course is an introduction to linguistic anthropology. It is impossible in a single semester to provide a complete overview of all topics that linguistic anthropologists address, so this course covers selected topics, the selection of which is aimed to illustrate how linguistic anthropologists go about doing their work: the range of topics they examine, the kinds of questions they ask, the types of approaches and methods they utilize, and the sorts of conclusions they reach.


ANT 310D • Introduction To Black Studies

31043 • Wint, Traci-Ann
Meets MW 1:00PM-2:30PM
(also listed as AFR 303)
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This course provides students with an introduction to Black Studies. In the first section of the course we consider the history of Black Studies in the U.S. using the integration and development of Black Studies here at the University of Texas, Austin as a case study. We then turn to considerations of the historical construction of Africa, the Black Diaspora, and the idea of Blackness. Building on this foundation the course provides students with the analytical tools to critically explore canonical Black Studies literature, themes, and theories. This section of the course interrogates race, gender, class, sexuality, and their intersections. The second section of the course focuses on Black cultures, power, and politics. It utilizes the analytical tools provided by the course to forge an understanding of Black gendered cultural forms. The third section of the course focuses in on the expression and use of Black Studies and the ethical questions raised by applying this perspective to everyday concerns in critical areas of social inequity.


ANT 310L • Introduction To South Asia

31044 • Maes, Claire
Meets TTH 12:30PM-2:00PM PAR 103
(also listed as ANS 302K)
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This course is designed to introduce students to the various historic and contemporary cultures that constitute South Asia. Students will learn about South Asia through a variety of disciplinary lenses. A wideranging exploration of the histories, religions, literatures, arts, etc. will acquaint students with the diversity found in South Asia. This course will expose students to various perspectives that complicate the question “What is South Asia?”


ANT 311D • Intro To Jewish Studies

31050 • Weinreb, Amelia
Meets MWF 12:00PM-1:00PM MEZ 2.124
(also listed as J S 301, MES 310, R S 313D)
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A hybrid two-way interactive course with a combination of classroom lectures and live-streamed discussions

Course Description

This survey course aims to expose students to major themes in Jewish Studies through guest lectures by UT faculty who work in the field. It is recommended for motivated undergraduates in any discipline with an intellectual curiosity about Jewish Studies, but requires no previous knowledge of Jewish religion, ethnicity, or culture. The material in the course is not designed be comprehensive, but rather provides a curated sample of lectures and core topics. This semester, the course is organized around three thematic units: 1) Exile and Diaspora, 2) Jewish Identity, and 3) Jewish Ethics.

The weekly rhythm of the course is generally as follows: On Mondays and Wednesdays, various faculty associated with Jewish Studies will visit the classroom and deliver lectures concentrating on their period, geographical area, and field of research as they relate to the thematic unit at hand. Fridays are a series of lively, fast-paced, interactive meetings, led by students. Students are encouraged to consider course materials comparatively, in view of both their distinct features and their overarching threads, and defend positions through evidence based both on lectures and the course reader. Student discussion leaders, designated in advance, will raise questions, stimulate debate, and integrate ideas into our collective analysis.

Course flags

This course carries both a Global Cultures and Ethics flag. Global Cultures courses are designed to increase your familiarity with cultural groups outside the United States. You should therefore expect a substantial portion of your grade to come from assignments covering the practices, beliefs, and histories of non-U.S. Jewish groups, past and present. Courses carrying the Ethics Flag equip you with the tools necessary for making ethical decisions in your adult and professional life. Courses carrying this flag expose you to ethical issues and to the process of applying ethical reasoning. This course exposes students to Jewish Ethics and its application.


ANT 320L • Speech Play And Verbal Art

31055 • Webster, Anthony
(also listed as LIN 373)
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This class takes an ethnographic and linguistic approach to the twin and twined concerns of speech play and verbal art. Ultimately, speech play and verbal art are social practices that are deeply embedded within and creative of linguistic structurings (call this grammar, if you like). After orienting students to the basic ideas of play, grammar, performance, and context; this class proceeds to look at a variety of examples of speech play and verbal art (from puns to lies to songs to stories to poetry) in a host of contexts and languages. Rather than being seen as a marginal pursuit, speech play and verbal art are revealed to be central features of the language, culture and individual nexus and thus essential to both ethnography (anthropology) and linguistics. Along the way, we may also find delight and wisdom in such examples of speech play and verbal art.


ANT 322E • Self/Culture In North Korea

31070 • Oppenheim, Robert
Meets TTH 3:30PM-5:00PM GAR 0.128
(also listed as ANS 361N)
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North Korea (officially the Democratic People’s Republic of Korea) is often understood almost solely through the challenges it poses, its failings, and its horrors.  The story is unremittingly one of nuclear breakout, famine, refugees, and gulags.  Without disregarding such issues entirely, this course focuses on a variety of recent attempts—notably in anthropology, history, literature, art history, and cultural studies—to understand the public culture of North Korea and the constitution of self and everyday life within it.  Readings will be supplemented with both documentary and feature films.

 


ANT 322G • Cultural Geographies Israel

31075 • Weinreb, Amelia
Meets MWF 1:00PM-2:00PM MEZ 2.122
(also listed as J S 365D, MES 341)
show description

A hybrid, two-way interactive course with a combination of livestreaming
and classroom meet-ups

This multidisciplinary, interactive, hybrid seminar is designed to foster conversation and creative projects about the cultural geography of Israel between upper-division students with interests in Jewish studies, Middle Eastern studies, anthropology, and geography. What makes this course unique is that it about 50% of the course is taught online from Israel by Dr. Amy Weinreb. To enhance absorption of course
texts, students will have the opportunity to virtually join the instructor in various locations in Israel throughout the semester using Zoom, and also GoPro technology. The aim is to bring Israel’s contemporary spaces, places and landscapes to life visually.


ANT 324D • Japan Relig/Westrn Imagintn

31080 • Traphagan, John
Meets MWF 9:00AM-10:00AM CMA 5.190
(also listed as ANS 340C, R S 352D)
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This course focuses on how Japanese religious traditions, particularly Zen, have been viewed from the perspective of people living in non-Japanese societies since the end of World War II. Using Ruth Benedict’s book The Chrysanthemum and the Sword as a starting point, we will explore different ways in which non-Japanese have imagined Japanese religious and ethical ideas and both explained Japanese behavior and adopted (often stereotyped) ideas about Japan into their writings about philosophy and life. We will discuss and deconstruct works by authors such as Alan Watts, Eugene Herrigel (Zen in the Art of Archery), and Robert Pirsig (Zen in the Art of Motorcycle Maintenance) as a framework for thinking about how Japanese religious and ethical ideas have been imagined in the West.


ANT 324L • Anthropol Of Health & Illness

31084 • Ali, Kamran
Meets TTH 2:00PM-3:30PM SAC 4.118
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This course seeks to make the students critical of dominant bio-medical assumptions of health and illness by exposing the historical, social, political , economic and cultural foundations of Western Medicine. The readings will critically discuss the historical construction on of the modern medicalized body by looking at some nineteenth century debates on anatomy, physiology, psychiatry, and anthropology. The issue of race and gender inherent in these debates will be explored by linking them to the expansion of the colonial enterprise and the rise of capitalism. Material will be introduced to help students evaluate the contemporary emphasis on the biomedical model of health and illness in relation to the plurality of health systems in different parts of the world. The course seeks to further evaluate the linkage between modern medicine and the construction of modern subjectivity and personhood.  


ANT 324L • Anthropol Of The Himalayas

31085 • Hindman, Heather
Meets TTH 2:00PM-3:30PM RLP 0.122
(also listed as AAS 330, ANS 361)
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This course looks at the history and culture of the Himalayan region, including the northern hills of India, (briefly) sections of Pakistan and Afghanistan, Tibet but especially Nepal. Some understanding of Asian history, politics and religion will be helpful (but not necessary) as our attempt will not be a comprehensive survey of the region. The Himalayas have been the site of a great deal of anthropological attention and as such we will be simultaneously be exploring several key theoretical, historical and methodological issues within the discipline of anthropology as we learn about places and people in the region. Particular attention will be paid to the area as a site for exoticism by the Occident (as the Shangri-la phenomenon), development politics, the environment, mountaineering and tourism as well as the current political tensions in the region. At the conclusion of the class, students should have a stronger idea of the important role this area has played in the political, religious and social imagination of the world and an appreciation of concepts such as ritual theory, social movements, modernity and gender studies.


ANT 324L • Anthropology Of Infrastructure

31090 • Peterson, Marina
Meets F 9:00AM-12:00PM SAC 5.118
(also listed as URB 352)
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Infrastructure enables movement, whether of water or people; it distributes electricity and goods; and it affords connectivity between people over time and space. As such, infrastructure creates relationships between resources, energy, built form, information, and people. Often unnoticed until it breaks down, infrastructure provides the underpinning for much of life as we know it. This course will address what infrastructure is and what it does. Topics will include: what happens when infrastructure fails, how infrastructure supports or challenges social inequalities, the work required for the creation and maintenance of infrastructure, and the relationship between senses, emotion, and infrastructure. Finally, it asks: what is the promise of infrastructure, and can new forms of infrastructure can be imagined? The class is organized around infrastructural forms, drawing on texts that introduce key conceptual concerns in the anthropology of infrastructure. Using Austin as a site for investigation, we will take field trips to infrastructure sites as a class. Students will learn ethnographic research methods and develop a research project over the course of the semester.


ANT 324L • Daily Life In Mesoamerica

31095 • Rodriguez, Enrique
Meets TTH 2:00PM-3:30PM SAC 4.174
(also listed as LAS 324L)
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In this course we will study the daily life of people in Mesoamerica, from the earliest inhabitants in the region to the myriad ways that Precolumbian life and archaeology affect the lives of people today. We will examine production strategies, agriculture, cooking, household life, burial practices, beautification, the life of children, gender, sexuality, ethnicity, and many other aspects of daily life. We will pay close attention to variation and continuities through space and time in Mesoamerica, and between different Mesoamerican cultures. We will study a variety of archaeological sites ranging from the small rural site of Chan in Belize, to the giant city of Teotihuacan in Mexico, from Joya del Cerén (buried in volcanic ash) to Tenochtitlan (buried under modern Mexico City), and many others. While we will study daily life as a worthy object of study in and of itself, we will also examine the relationship between daily life and broad political and economic patterns, including the formation of ranked societies, warfare, and empire-building.


ANT 324L • Development And Its Critics

31120 • Hindman, Heather
Meets TTH 5:00PM-6:30PM RLP 0.118
(also listed as ANS 361)
show description

Course Description

This class approaches particular aspects of the contemporary state of international aid and development. While people have been seeking better methods of doing good in hopes of improving their own lives and those of their community for a long time, this isn’t development, at least as we will discuss it in this class. In the post-colonial era (thus after about 1950), nation-states have created new methods and logics behind their support of/by other nation-states. While governments were long central to the operation of international aid, businesses and NGOs (non-governmental organizations) have gained prominence in recent years, and it can often be difficult in the present era to disentangle public/private or governmental/non-governmental dimensions. Increasingly (and perhaps especially because of the critique of colonialism), individuals and groups wonder if development is even a good idea, and instead promote ideas of social entrepreneurship or other forms of revenue-generating “aid programs.” The result is an extremely complex landscape behind even the most basic goal of aid - “fewer people starving, suffering and dying.” Beyond this goal, there is little agreement. Rather than approaching the unreasonable goal of deciding what good aid and bad aid is (read this twice - we will not be solving the problem of the right way to do development), we will be looking at two particular aspects of aid: the imbrication of aid into nation-state goals and development as a distinctive type of industry. At the conclusion of the class, students will have a better idea about the decision making that takes place within the development industry and the scope of aid as a economic and social force in the contemporary world.

 


ANT 324L • Environmental Anthropology

31110-31115 • Cons, Jason
Meets MW 3:00PM-4:00PM RLP 0.112
show description

What is the relationship between culture and ecology? How can environments produce inequalities? Is there such a thing as wilderness? Where is the boundary between the human and the non-human? How is “nature” understood in different communities? And how do people around the world live with toxicity, climate change, and other forms environmental degradation? Environmental Anthropology explores the answers to these questions and more. The course is designed around a set of key questions and challenges in the anthropological study of the environment. The course is designed not as a survey of the history of the field, but rather as a means to introduce students to a set of questions and analytic tools and invite them to quickly move towards applying them to real-world cases.


ANT 324L • Gis/Rem Sns Archaeol/Paleo

31125 • Reed, Denne
Meets TTH 9:30AM-11:00AM SAC 5.112
(also listed as GRG 356T)
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This course surveys archeological and paleontological applications of remotely sensed data such as aerial photography and satellite imagery for use in locating field sites, planning field logistics and conducting landscape analysis. The remote sensing component of the course covers remote sensing data acquisition, image georectification, image processing and classification. The GIS component of the course builds on the remote sensing component and adds to it the analysis of map features stored in databases. The course introduces databases theory and practice, and moves through the various stages of GIS workflow: the planning and design of GIS projects, building geospatial datasets, various methods of geospatial analysis and a short introduction to map layouts and reports. This course covers GIS and remote sensing from an applied perspective and students are expected to invest lab time in completing tutorials on GIS and RS methods as well as applying these methods to individual projects.


ANT 324L • Global Indigenous Issues

31140 • Canova, Paola
Meets MW 10:00AM-11:30AM SAC 4.118
(also listed as LAS 324L)
show description

This course examines theoretical and ethnographic issues facing indigenous peoples around the world. It will critically examine debates surrounding terms often taken for granted, such as such as indigeneity, mestizaje, and multiculturalism. The course will also take a historical and ethnographic approach to analyze the ways in which indigenous peoples have been impacted and continue to respond to forces such as colonialism and capitalism in different geographical regions of the Americas. Drawing on topics such as contact and colonial expansion, self-determination and the nation state, gender, ecologies, social movements, and ontologies, the course will explore the lived realities of different groups of people, examine the influence of European contact, and discuss how indigenous peoples are creatively advancing their life projects in different contexts.


ANT 324L • Graf/Pstr Art: Islam World

31150 • Shirazi, Faegheh
Meets MWF 12:00PM-1:00PM PAR 308
(also listed as ISL 373, MES 342, R S 358, WGS 340)
show description

Please check back for updates.


ANT 324L • Queer Ethnographies

31130 • Merabet, Sofian
Meets TTH 11:00AM-12:30PM SAC 4.118
(also listed as WGS 340)
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This upper-level undergraduate writing course deals with the anthropological analysis of queer gender and sexuality. Its aim is to critically evaluate formative concepts and theories that have been subject to recent debates within Anthropology, Gender Studies, and Queer Theory. Through the reading of a variety of ethnographies from Asia and the Americas, we will partly explore how terms like “women” and “men,” “femininity” and “masculinity,” as well as “homosexuality,” “heterosexuality,” “bisexuality,” and “transsexuality” structure people’s experiences, but also how local terminologies inform sexual identity formations around the globe. In this vein, the course focuses on local-level social and cultural processes that challenge a wide range of heteronormativities within a regional and global framework. The basic theme of the material for this course concerns the extent to which both realities and the ways in which they are perceived are socio-cultural constructs that are subject to constant change. This course carries the Writing Flag. Writing Flag courses are designed to give students experience with writing in an academic discipline. In this class, you can expect to write regularly during the session and receive feedback from your instructor to help you improve your writing. You will also have the opportunity to go to the University Writing Center, and you may be asked to read and discuss your peers’ work. You should therefore expect a substantial portion of your grade to come from your written work. Because students fulfill three hours of their Core Communication requirement with a Writing Flag course, courses flagged for writing address the following new “core objectives”: Critical Thinking Skills: to include creative thinking, innovation, inquiry, and analysis, evaluation and synthesis of information. Communication Skills: to include effective development, interpretation and expression of ideas through written, oral and visual communication. Teamwork: to include the ability to consider different points of view and to work effectively with others to support a shared purpose or goal. Personal Responsibility: to include the ability to connect choices, actions and consequences to ethical decision-making


ANT 325J • The Photographic Image

31155 • Campbell, Craig
Meets M 2:00PM-4:00PM SAC 4.120
show description

"The Photographic Image" applies concepts and practices from visual ethnography to the study of memory, place, and everyday life. The course aims at developing counter-intuitive and subversive approaches to practices of looking and techniques of representation. Whereas photographs are often taken to be static representations of the world, we will invert this idea and explore how images can be transient and ephemeral by focusing not only on how to produce images but how they are 'read' by others.

 

The class is planned around multiple photo-based projects. You will be required to read for these projects and undertake original photography assignments. At all points in the course students are drawn into the use of image-making as an interpretive and critical engagement with course readings. We will begin with techniques of visual inquiry established by visual anthropologists, documentarians, and artists working on the margins of documentary traditions. Students are expected to engage fully in both individual and group activities. Students are expected to have at their disposal a camera (digital or analogue).


ANT 325L • Amer Jewish Material Cul

31175 • Seriff, Suzanne
Meets TTH 12:30PM-2:00PM SAC 4.118
(also listed as J S 365, R S 346)
show description

This upper level course explores the multiple ways in which Jews in America publically depict themselves — or are depicted by non-Jews — in American museums and other public institutions such as world’s fairs, archives, synagogues, and historic homes, now and over the past century. We will focus especially on the material culture — books, artifacts, architecture, ceremonial objects, jewelry, souvenirs, cookbooks, head coverings, sports memorabilia, and everyday household objects — through which these institutions and exhibitions tell stories and make meaning about Jews in America. Following material culture scholar, Barbara Kirshenblatt-Gimblett, we will pose the question, “What does it mean to show?”— or, in this case, to show, “Jewishly?” Is there such a thing as a “Jewish Museum?” What—and who—are they for? Are they just a holding place for relics of the past? Do they perpetuate the idea that Jews are a vibrant, complex, but strange people that used to dwell amongst us, but don’t anymore? We will take a look “behind the scenes” of these institutions to explore the powerful messages conveyed not only by the objects themselves but by the specific ways in which these objects are grouped, labeled, interpreted and displayed for a public audience— both Jewish and non-Jewish alike. What is the role of museums and other such institutions to define or construct the parameters of a people’s life, religion, civilization, history, or culture? Drawing from the fields of folklore, anthropology, American Studies, Jewish studies, religious studies, and museum studies, we will consider how makers, owners, users, curators, collectors, and civic leaders re-create and re-negotiate new meanings for Jewish material culture objects, especially as they are carefully lifted from their originally intended contexts of prayer, celebration, memorialization, or commemoration, and re-purposed for a new life of education, entertainment, aesthetic enjoyment, performance, or exhibition in American museums and public institutions. This class includes field trips, guest speakers, and fieldwork-based research for a final class presentation.


ANT 325L • Technoculture

31165 • Hartigan, John
Meets MW 1:00PM-2:30PM SAC 4.118
show description

This class examines the many technological mediums that saturate daily life, asking how they shape our selves and our interactions with others. We begin by dissecting attention—what do we focus on, for how long, and with what affects? Attention is more than a personal matter; it has many collective forms, as well as biological dimensions. We’ll think about how we value some forms of attention and deride others, depending on social contexts and cultural sensibilities. Then we’ll sift through the layers of technological mediation that alternately facilitate, channel, or diffract our abilities to attend to relationships, objects, and the world around us. With these patterns and tendencies established, we’ll turn to analyze how media systems and technological infrastructures intentionally organize and mine collective forms of attention—online, certainly, but increasingly in real-world settings. We will sample various ethnographic techniques and methods—digital and traditional—then try these out in developing brief analytical accounts of the cultures of technologies that permeate social worlds today. We’ll conclude with some reflections on how the human and the social are being actively redefined today. The aim of this class is to encourage new forms of intellectual engagement; no technological expertise is required.  


ANT 326D • Native Americans In The Plains

31180 • Wade, Maria
Meets MW 1:00PM-2:30PM SAC 4.174
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From the middle 18th century through the late 19th century the Great Plains region underwent drastic changes in terms of the environment, demography, and cultural diversity. The rapid influx of various groups of people into the Plains, from Native American groups to European settlers, made the Plains the ultimate theater to rehearse short-term strategies and long-term policies. This course will survey the ethnohistory of some of the most influential Native groups on the Plains, from the arrival of the Spanish through the reservation period. We will explore the relationships and interaction between European settlers and Native groups, as well as the outcome of some scientific expeditions and military campaigns. In this course, we will adopt a long-term perspective to make sense of the development of European policies and movements, the changing configurations among Native groups, and the pivotal importance of resources such as the buffalo, the horse, and the gun. We will also look at specific events and historical figures, such as Sitting Bull, Crazy Horse, and General Custer, whose actions became symbolic of a turbulent historical period.


ANT 326L • Cultures In Contact

31185 • Covey, Ronald
Meets TTH 11:00AM-12:30PM SAC 4.174
(also listed as LAS 324L)
show description

"Cultures in Contact" is a multi-disciplinary course which combines Historical, Anthropological, Geographical and Literary analyses of the continuing "contact period" in the New World.  The issues addressed span the last 500+ years of cultural interaction in the Americas, looking especially at the processes of cultural interaction, competition, cooperation, and synthesis that have taken place among people from the Americas, Europe, Africa, and Asia.


ANT 336L • Natv Amer Culs North Of Mex

31195 • Sturm, Circe
Meets TTH 12:30PM-2:00PM SAC 4.174
(also listed as AMS 321)
show description

This upper-division undergraduate course examines contemporary articulations of indigenous cultures and practices in the U.S. and Canada. Because the present cannot be understood without understanding historically how we got to here, this course includes histories that inform the contemporary. We will cover critical developments that shape and are shaped by late 20th century and early 21st century indigenous life. Issues include but are not limited to the American Indian Movement; IdleNoMore; tribal and First Nation citizenship politics; the politics of race and indigeneity in the U.S. and Canada; gaming and other economic development strategies; residential schools; evolving kinship practices; indigenous feminisms, masculinities, and sexualities; indigenous environmental and religious politics (including how “environment” and “religion” are inadequate for understanding those politics!); food sovereignty movements; and science, technology and Native Americans. Course readings come from anthropology, U.S. and Canadian indigenous studies, history, and cultural studies. We will read scholarly work, blogs, and other popular literature. The course features several guest speakers, some via Skype.


ANT 346L • Primate Social Behavior

31200 • Lewis, Rebecca
Meets MWF 11:00AM-12:00PM SAC 5.172
(also listed as WGS 323C)
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COURSE DESCRIPTION AND OBJECTIVE:

This course focuses on the study of primate behavior and why primates do what they do. It is essentially a course on animal behavior with a focus on primates. Thus, this class will explore the basic theoretical principles that guide primatologists and other zoologists. As we examine some of the models used to explain primate behavior, we will explore the behavior of the four radiations of primates in detail. The objective of this course is for students to understand the major theoretical concepts of primate behavior.

COURSE FORMAT AND REQUIREMENTS:

Prerequisite: ANT 301

This class will generally follow a lecture format. There will be projects assigned for outside of the classroom to be “presented” either on Canvas or in the classroom. Project assignments presented/posted after the deadline will not be accepted. Discussion will be encouraged during lectures and we will be discussing the outside projects in class. It is difficult to participate if you are not present in class and so attendance is highly recommended. Plus, the majority (but not all) of the test questions will come from lectures.


ANT 346M • Comparative Primate Ecology

31205 • Lewis, Rebecca
Meets MWF 10:00AM-11:00AM SAC 5.172
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Comparative Primate Ecology will explore the following topics with respect to primates: population ecology, community ecology, feeding adaptations, foraging strategies, ranging behavior, and life history strategies.


ANT 360K • Civilization Of The Maya

31220 • Valdez, Fred
Meets M 3:00PM-6:00PM RLP 1.106
(also listed as LAS 324L)
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This course reviews Maya civilization from

archaeological and art history perspectives. The Maya region is defined and

described in order to have a common basis for studying the civilization. Early

investigations into the Maya area are briefly reviewed. A summary of the earliest

inhabitants (Paleolindian and Archaic foundations) is also presented.

The Preclassic Period (ca. 2000 BC – AD 250) is detailed as the

beginnings and development of Maya Civilization (with short comparisons &

comments of neighboring societies). Early and Late Classic Maya are reviewed

for their various cultural developments, both temporal and regional. The Terminal

Classic and its related events are studied as well as adjustments by Maya

Civilization that define the Postclassic.

The final segment of the course will inquire into Maya religion and

thought as expressed (mostly) archaeologically. A short review of current/recent

archaeological projects and the research of interest may be presented.


ANT 366 • Anat And Bio Of Human Skeleton

31225 • Kappelman, John
Meets MW 1:00PM-1:30PM SAC 5.172
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This course introduces the student to an in-depth study of the human skeleton. Class sessions combine lecture and laboratory sessions and cover topics including developmental biology, functional morphology, and skeletal identification, with a special focus on the latter skill as it relates to forensics and archaeological studies. Students will also be introduced to new 3D imaging techniques for studying the skeleton. 

This class requires both intensive in-class and out-of-class preparation. Participants must be prepared to handle actual human osteological specimens and have a professional approach to this subject and the human remains. An interest in human skeletal identification is especially applicable to the fields of archeology, physical anthropology, health sciences, law, and law enforcement.


ANT 366 • Anat/Bio Human Skeleton-Wb

31230 • Kappelman, John
show description

This course introduces the student to an in-depth study of the human skeleton. Class sessions combine lecture and laboratory sessions and cover topics including developmental biology, functional morphology, and skeletal identification, with a special focus on the latter skill as it relates to forensics and archaeological studies. Students will also be introduced to new 3D imaging techniques for studying the skeleton. 

This class requires both intensive in-class and out-of-class preparation. Participants must be prepared to handle actual human osteological specimens and have a professional approach to this subject and the human remains. An interest in human skeletal identification is especially applicable to the fields of archeology, physical anthropology, health sciences, law, and law enforcement.


ANT 388K • Anthropology Of Education

31269 • Urrieta, Luis
Meets T 7:00PM-10:00PM SZB 526
(also listed as EDC 380G)
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This course focuses on the subfield of anthropology and education; its formation and development over time. In particular, students will explore the concept of culture the various ways that anthropologists have used ethnography to study education, broadly conceived. This course addresses, as does the anthropology of education as whole, issues of race, gender, sexual identities, and class as we consider the application of anthropological theory and methods to educational practice and research.


ANT 391 • Anthropology Between Cul & Soc

31270 • Merabet, Sofian
Meets T 2:00PM-5:00PM SAC 5.124
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Based on book publications by faculty members of the UT Anthropology Department, this graduate seminar explores some of the current debates in the US surrounding the anthropological study of culture and society. How can we make sense of sociocultural anthropology as an academic discipline today? is the central question of this course. Problematizing whether and, if so, how area studies have played a role in shaping the idea of the “field,” we will look at location and positionality as a principal site of epistemological limitation and possibility for anthropological research.

 

 

Required Texts (listed alphabetically):

 

Campbell, Craig (2014) Agitating Images: Photography against History in Indigenous Siberia. Minneapolis: University of Minnesota Press.

 

Cons, Jason (2016) Sensitive Space: Fragmented Territory at the India-Bangladesh Border. Seattle: University of Washington Press.

 

Handman, Courtney (2014) Critical Christianity: Translation and Denominational Conflict in Papua New Guinea. University of California Press.

 

Hartigan, John (1999) Racial Situations: Class Predicaments of Whiteness in Detroit. Princeton: Princeton University Press.

 

Keeler, Ward (2017) The Traffic in Hierarchy: Masculinity and Its Others in Buddhist Burma. Honolulu: University of Hawai’i Press.

 

Menchaca, Martha (2016) The Politics of Dependency: US Reliance on Mexican Oil and Farm Labor. Austin: The University of Texas Press.

 

Merabet, Sofian (2014) Queer Beirut. Austin: The University of Texas Press.

 

Peterson, Marina (2010) Sound, Space, and the City: Civic Performance in Downtown Los Angeles. Philadelphia: University of Pennsylvania Press.

 

Smith, Christen (2016) Afro-Paradise: Blackness, Violence, and Performance in Brazil. Chicago: University of Illinois Press.

 

Stewart, Kathleen and Lauren Berlant (2019) The Hundreds. Durham: Duke University Press.

 

Strong, Pauline (1999) Captive Selves, Captivating Others: The Politics and Poetics Of Colonial American Captivity Narratives. Boulder: Westview Press.

 

Sturm, Circe (2002) Blood Politics: Race, Culture, and Identity in the Cherokee Nation of Oklahoma. Berkeley: University of California Press.


ANT 391 • Anthropology Of Performing Art

31275 • Keeler, Ward
Meets TH 9:00AM-12:00PM SAC 4.120
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The seminar will consider the juncture of politics and performance. But not in the sense of cultural policy or political intervention in the arts but rather in focusing on the mutual implications of power and attention that any performance entails. Performers are individuals who lay claim to people's attention: they are imposing or at least hoping to exercise some control over others. Spectators are people who choose to submit to performers' claims, at least provisionally. We will look at a number of different kinds of genres to investigate the kinds of techniques performers, and genres, use to justify their hold on people, and the kinds of responses potential spectators make to those claims upon their attention.

 

Readings will include basic texts by Bauman, Bourdieu, and Brooks, and monographs from a number of different societies in East Asia, South Asia, Southeast Asia, and Africa. Students who would like to suggest particular topics are welcome to contact me beforehand (ward.keeler@gmail.com). I am currently on a fellowship overseas but will be back in my office at UT at the beginning of August.


ANT 391 • Culture, History, And Power

31279 • Ali, Kamran
Meets M 2:00PM-5:00PM SAC 5.118
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In a cross cultural and inter-disciplinary perspective, the course will critically engage with historiographical debates on issues related to narrative, the history and politics of the archives, the politics of representation and the construction of facts. We will read works by Hayden White, E. P. Thompson, Reinhart Koselleck, Fernand Braudel, Carlo Ginzburg and Michel-Rolph Trouillot among others. Over the course of the semester we will also follow the debates in Subaltern Historians by scholars like Ranajit Guha, Dipesh Chakrabarty and Gyan Pandey. Regionally, the course will be broad. While most of the monographs will be on South Asia and the Middle East, there will be ample discussion of European, Latin American and African cases.


ANT 391 • Ethnography: Critical Perspect

31280 • Canova, Paola
Meets M 1:00PM-4:00PM RLP 0.124
(also listed as LAS 391)
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The seminar is an exploration of the relationship between ethnography and theory from an

anthropological perspective, focusing on the ways in which social theory and methodology are

mutually productive. The course will critically reflect on the multiple ways in which scholars are

thinking and writing about contemporary social issues and people’s subjective experiences

drawing on questions such as how do we use data to think about theory and how do theoretical

frameworks shape ethnographic production. The class will draw on conceptual tools combined

with a close reading and analysis of ethnographic studies dealing with subjects such as gender,

the environment, economics, and human-non human relations among others to critically examine

themes such as power and knowledge production, the politics of ethnographic fieldwork,

positionality and representation, decolonizing methodologies, and experimental writing

approaches. Overall, this seminar seeks to stimulate student’s critical awareness of the complex

dynamics at play that shape the production of ethnographic knowledge.


ANT 391 • State Territory Sovereignty

31285 • Cons, Jason
Meets W 9:00AM-12:00PM SAC 5.118
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This course provides a rigorous introduction to the anthropology of the state. Focusing primarily on key theoretical interventions within anthropology and cognate disciplines, the course introduces a set different ways to understand the exercise and accomplishment of rule. Course readings are oriented around a series of key questions and debates in both historical and contemporary discussion of state power. Namely, the course asks:

• What is the state?

• What does it mean to examine “state formation” historically and ethnographically?

• What different forms (states?) might a state take?

• What is state power and how does it work?

• How might one understand and trace everyday experiences of and encounters with the state?

• What is the relationship between sovereignty, violence, and legitimacy?

• What is territory and how is it lived?

The course explores different ways that these questions have been engaged in Marxian thought, poststructural critique, and other schools of critical social theory. Though course readings are primarily theoretical in content, the course is targeted broadly at students interested in carrying out ethnographic and/or historical qualitative research on questions related to politics, power, and rule.


ANT 391 • Violence/Sovereignty

31290 • Crosson, Jonathan
Meets W 3:00PM-6:00PM CMA 3.134
(also listed as AFR 385, LAS 391, R S 383C)
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Foucault had insisted that we cut off the head of the sovereign in political theory, but sovereignty has returned as a pressing concern for scholars in recent years. Unlike Foucualdian biopolitics, which emphasizes the economization of power and the care of the self, sovereignty remains overtly wed to violence and to questions of intolerance in contemporary worlds. This class examines the relationships between political theologies, sovereignty, and violence, as scholars attempt to elucidate or undo notions of sovereignty in modern nation-states. We will focus on questions of indigenous ritual sovereignties, religious violence, and nonsovereign political theologies. While the focus is on the modern Americas, the questions addressed extend across various historical eras and geographical regions.


ANT 392L • Phys Anthro: Morph/Evolution

31300 • Shapiro, Liza
Meets T 2:00PM-5:00PM SAC 4.120
show description

Content and Scope:  Why are humans unique in so many features; in having culture and language; in being bipedal; in the way we gather our food, and its extraordinary range; in our social and sexual behavior and its variability?  This course examines patterns of anatomical, behavioral, and genetic similarities and differences among living primates and humans, and the evidence for human evolution as reconstructed from the fossil record.  A wide range of evidence from the natural and social sciences is presented to understand present and past anatomical and behavioral adaptations, and to view humans and our ancestors as members of diverse animal and plant communities.  Our goal is to understand the place of humans in the world.


ANT 392M • Intro To Grad Social Anthro

31305 • Peterson, Marina
Meets T 9:00AM-12:00PM SAC 5.124
show description

This course introduces doctoral students to major texts in sociocultural theory that have been central to the development of the discipline of anthropology from its colonial roots in North America and Western Europe to the contemporary period. While not a comprehensive history of anthropological theory, this course provides a chronological and contextualized perspective as it explores and interprets the relationships between varying and, at times, competing theoretical, epistemological, and ethical claims on anthropology and related disciplines. Based on classical scholarship by some of the “founding fathers” of modern social science, this course traces parts of the genealogical trajectories taken by the anthropological study of culture and society. Following that intellectual legacy, this course asks a central question: How can we make sense of sociocultural anthropology as an academic discipline today? Problematizing the role the concept of “culture” has played in shaping the idea of the “field,” we will look at “location” as a principal site of epistemological limitation and possibility for anthropological research.


ANT 393 • Lang Variation/Style/Register

31310 • Slotta, James
Meets TH 9:00AM-12:00PM SAC 4.114
show description

Over twentieth century, the mainline of linguistics has increasingly excluded social, cultural, political, and economic considerations from the study of language. In response to this trend, both sociolinguistics and linguistic anthropology have emerged as fields of inquiry offering alternatives to this asocial vision of language. And notably, both disciplines have done so in large measure through the investigation and theorization of language variation.

 

In this course, we begin by looking back over a number of influential modes of studying language variation to better understand the diverse ways in which social, cultural, political, and economic factors are integrated into the study of language at present. In particular, we review: 1) classic texts of variationist and interactional sociolinguistics to gain a sense of how language variation was constituted as a domain amenable to sociological and anthropological treatment; 2) later waves of sociolinguistics that have emphasized matters of style, identity, agency, and social meaning as factors that drive and structure language variability; 3) enregisterment as a way in which culture, ideology, and intertextuality have been integrated with the study of language variation; and 4) new directions of research that highlight political and economic considerations of value, power, and institutionalized structures of inequality shaping contemporary ecologies of language in the United States and around the world. In the final weeks we turn to a number of exemplary recent monographs that take up a wide range of topics related to language variation, including code switching, language change, standardization, language shift, multilingualism, language endangerment, and many others.


ANT 393 • Translation

31315 • Webster, Anthony
show description

At issue in this course is the fundamental anthropological problem of the negotiation of difference, and of how difference is made manifest, created, concealed, or analyzed. Although at one point anthropology thought of its task as making other cultures and people comprehensible to Western audiences through a process of cultural translation, the pre-suppositions of that task came under heavy criticism at the end of the twentieth century. More and more scholarship is now focused on the ways in which situated social actors are themselves engaged in processes of cultural and linguistic translations as a regular, if not always mundane, fact of social life. But without the religious, universalizing, or evolutionary basis of earlier translation models, how do we conceptualize these projects of transformation? Although we will start by analyzing models of translation that seek to ensure “authenticity” (of selves or of cultures) we will problematize such models over the course of the semester through readings on colonial knowledge production, gender, law, language and the subject, and techno-science. Rather than thinking of translation as an exceptional moment of confrontation between two autonomous linguistic or cultural systems, we will end with analyses that examine translation as the site of the production of cyborgs and assemblages – people, objects, and texts in cultural circulation. One line of research, a concern with poetics and translation has sought to think about both linguistic difference—particular constellations of uses of lexico-grammatical features—and of the role of parallelism as a form of poetic translation (where parallelism seeks to create an equivalence). In this way of thinking of translation, translation begins as a kind of iconicity—a resemblance of something to someone and parallelism a mode a creating such iconicity, such “translations.” Poetics then both defies translation and is a form of translation.  


ANT 394M • Critical Media Practices

31318 • Campbell, Craig
Meets F 9:00AM-12:00PM SAC 5.124
show description

This workshop-format seminar builds theoretical foundations for encounters with sensible and sensuous worlds. Through weekly readings, screenings, experiences, and group exercises, we explore ways of knowing, remediating, and evoking as they not only originate in the academy but also from the art world. We look at the way these formations relate to and produce their objects of fascination. Key words like critique, media, intermedia, politics, affect, ethics, and aesthetics are sites of current attention and coalescence in disciplines affliated through the humanities. Readings (which are limited to less than 50 pages per week, and often less than that) will include selections from Jacques Rancière, Kathleen Stewart, Natalie Loveless, George Marcus, Trinh T. Minh-Ha, Erin Manning and Brian Massumi, Tim Ingold, and others. The readings are designed to provide a framework for collective discussions without distracting from individual and small-group readings you may undertake for your independent final project.

Roughly half the classes will be spent actively workshopping projects directly (or indirectly) related to your own research. The other half will be dedicated to a few select readings that help to feel out the edges of emerging discourses on arts-based research (sometimes called research creation). Over the course of the semester I will assign a series of 'obstructions' ... these are mini-projects meant to challenge you to remediate (over and over, under different conditions) your final project.

Past projects by students include websites, software, gallery installations, photo-essays, short videos, illustrated essays, and slide shows. Graduate students in RTF and Studio Arts are encouraged to join this seminar as are students in text-heavy disciplines who are interested in exploring the critical world of multi-sensory research and expression as well as research creation. No previous experience with film, video, photography, or other studio arts is necessary. I work closely with each of you to develop skills plans to ensure completion of your desired final project.

 

Summary:

1.  Each participant identifies an already completed project which they transform or remediate into a new media-form.  Most past students come in with a paper they have written in another class, some have a project already half completed. The key is that you are focusing on remediating research you have already completed (or nearly completed) rather than conducting new research. This class is designed to help you develop skills to foster play and experimentation.

 

2. In the seminar we collectively read, view, and experience work that challenges us to think and theorize knowledge production as well as conceptual and compositional work.

 

 


ANT 432L • Primate Anatomy

31190 • Shapiro, Liza
Meets TTH 11:00AM-12:30PM SAC 5.172
show description

An exploration of the relationship between primate anatomical form and function, with emphasis on adaptations to diet and locomotion.  The course is also designed to demonstrate how such information can be applied to the fossil record in order to reconstruct the evolutionary development of primate adaptations.

There is a two hour lab section associated with this class.