skip to contentThe University of Texas at Austin

FRIT Course Spotlights

This page spotlights specific courses in the upcoming registration cycle. Click on the course title for a class description and instructor information. To explore all course offerings in the department by field of study and semester, go to UT FRIT Courses. UT Austin updates the official course schedule about two weeks before registration opens on the UT Registrar Official Course Schedule.

Fall 2022 Courses

  • FR 320E Advanced French I
  • FR 322E Advanced French II
  • FR 324L Practical Phonetics
  • FR 325C Crisis and Conflict
  • FR 328C French Through Film
  • FR 350F Francophone Lit and Culture
  • FR 351C Narrating Multilingual Self
  • FR 358C Cinema & Memory
  • FR 325D Self and Society
  • FR 329C French through Music
  • FC 342 French through Coding
  • FC 341 Arab Francophonie
  • ITL 320 Advanced Italian
  • ITL 321 Narrating Woman from Dante to Igiaba Scego: An Introduction to Italian Literature
  • ITL 349P Italian Internship
  • ITC 330 Ferrante Fever: Lit, Film and TV
  • ITC 338 Italian Television Advertising

This page spotlights specific courses in the upcoming registration cycle. Click on the course title for a class description and instructor information. To explore all course offerings in the department by field of study and semester, click here: UT FRIT Courses. UT Austin updates the official course schedule about two weeks before registration opens: UT Registrar Official Course Schedule 

  • FR 320E Advanced French I
  • FR 322E Advanced French II
  • FR 324L Practical Phonetics
  • FR 325C Crisis and Conflict
  • FR 325E Representing Difference in France, Middle Ages to the Present
  • FR 327C French Through Cuisine
  • FR 330K The Joy of French
  • FR 349P French Internship
  • FR 363L French Through Media
  • FR 372 Comparative Stylistics
  • F C 341 Americans in Paris
  • ITL 320 Advanced Italian
  • ITL 328 Composition and Conversation
  • ITL 375 Writing Fascism, the War, the Resistance (Scrivere il Fascismo, la Guerra e la Resistenza)
  • ITC 330 American Dante
  • ITC 339 Italian Cinema 
  • This advanced language course’s goal is to substantially advance your spoken, written and listening skills in French while discussion controversial social topics in France and in the United States such as the effects of social media in interpersonal relationships, gender equality, and the limits of personal freedoms. There will be 3 written exams, 3 debates, 3 major written assignments based on the 3 themes of the course and a final project.
    FR 320E is a fast-paced challenging course that requires extensive outside of class preparation in order to succeed in improving your vocabulary and grammar level (2-3 hours of preparation for each hour we meet is normal at the beginning). The prerequisite for FR 320E is FR 317C with at least a grade of C. If you received a C- in FR 317C, you do NOT meet the prerequisite for this course. This course carries the Writing flag.Panel 1. Add body text in this space.

  • FR 322E Advanced French II (Instructor varies)

    This advanced language course’s goal is to substantially advance your spoken, written and listening skills in French while discussion controversial social topics both in the Francophone world and in the United States such as the effects of globalization in the world, conflicts regarding immigration, and the loss of indigenous cultures and languages due to colonialism/imperialism. There will be 3 written exams, 4 oral exams (2 individual presentations and 2 debates), 2 major written assignments based on 2 of the themes of the course and a final project.
    FR 322E is a fast-paced challenging course that requires extensive outside of class preparation in order to succeed in improving your vocabulary and grammar level (2-3 hours of preparation for each hour we meet is normal at the beginning). The prerequisite for FR 322E is FR 320E with at least a grade of C. If you received a C- in FR 320E, you do NOT meet the prerequisite for this course. This course carries the Global Cultures flag.

  • FR 324L Practical Phonetics

    PThis introduction to French phonetics provides students with a structured and practical understanding of the French sound system. The basics of descriptive phonetics and phonetic transcription are taught. Pronunciation and discrimination exercises emphasize individual sounds such as nasal vowels and the [u]-[y] contrast, as well as prosodic features (intonation, syllabification, liaison, etc.). The class is conducted in French.
    The course is organized around:
    Descriptive linguistics. Our text materials and classroom sessions provide descriptions and examples of essential features of French speech, such as l’assimilation, l’enchaînement, la syllabation, la ‘loi de position’, la dénasalisation, etc.
    Practice in pronunciation and discrimination. With opportunities to apply your knowledge of linguistic description and phonetic transcription, you practice and sharpen your pronunciation and auditory discrimination of French sounds.
    Improvement. Ten percent of your final grade is determined by your improvement over the course of the semester. Improvement is measured in part by comparing your reading aloud of a Diagnostic Exercise at the beginning of the term with your reading of similar material at the end of the term.

  • Accordion 4
    Panel 4. Add body text in this space.
  • Accordion 5
    Panel 5. Add body text in this space.
  • This advanced language course’s goal is to substantially advance your spoken, written and listening skills in French while discussion controversial social topics in France and in the United States such as the effects of social media in interpersonal relationships, gender equality, and the limits of personal freedoms. There will be 3 written exams, 3 debates, 3 major written assignments based on the 3 themes of the course and a final project.
    FR 320E is a fast-paced challenging course that requires extensive outside of class preparation in order to succeed in improving your vocabulary and grammar level (2-3 hours of preparation for each hour we meet is normal at the beginning). The prerequisite for FR 320E is FR 317C with at least a grade of C. If you received a C- in FR 317C, you do NOT meet the prerequisite for this course. This course carries the Writing flag.Panel 1. Add body text in this space.

  • FR 322E Advanced French II (Instructor varies)

    This advanced language course’s goal is to substantially advance your spoken, written and listening skills in French while discussion controversial social topics both in the Francophone world and in the United States such as the effects of globalization in the world, conflicts regarding immigration, and the loss of indigenous cultures and languages due to colonialism/imperialism. There will be 3 written exams, 4 oral exams (2 individual presentations and 2 debates), 2 major written assignments based on 2 of the themes of the course and a final project.
    FR 322E is a fast-paced challenging course that requires extensive outside of class preparation in order to succeed in improving your vocabulary and grammar level (2-3 hours of preparation for each hour we meet is normal at the beginning). The prerequisite for FR 322E is FR 320E with at least a grade of C. If you received a C- in FR 320E, you do NOT meet the prerequisite for this course. This course carries the Global Cultures flag.

  • FR 324L Practical Phonetics

    PThis introduction to French phonetics provides students with a structured and practical understanding of the French sound system. The basics of descriptive phonetics and phonetic transcription are taught. Pronunciation and discrimination exercises emphasize individual sounds such as nasal vowels and the [u]-[y] contrast, as well as prosodic features (intonation, syllabification, liaison, etc.). The class is conducted in French.
    The course is organized around:
    Descriptive linguistics. Our text materials and classroom sessions provide descriptions and examples of essential features of French speech, such as l’assimilation, l’enchaînement, la syllabation, la ‘loi de position’, la dénasalisation, etc.
    Practice in pronunciation and discrimination. With opportunities to apply your knowledge of linguistic description and phonetic transcription, you practice and sharpen your pronunciation and auditory discrimination of French sounds.
    Improvement. Ten percent of your final grade is determined by your improvement over the course of the semester. Improvement is measured in part by comparing your reading aloud of a Diagnostic Exercise at the beginning of the term with your reading of similar material at the end of the term.

  • Accordion 4
    Panel 4. Add body text in this space.
  • Accordion 5
    Panel 5. Add body text in this space.
College of Liberal Arts

FR 320E Advanced French I (Instructor varies)

All Sections on MWF:
9am - 10am, MEZ 2.118, 36250
10am - 11am, MEZ 1.202, 36255
11am - 12pm, GAR 0.132, 36260
12pm - 1pm, MEZ 2.122, 36265

Learn More
College of Liberal Arts

FR 322E Advanced French II (Instructor varies)

All Sections on MWF:
10am - 11am PAR 304, 36270
12pm - 1pm MEZ 1.208, 36275
2pm - 3pm BEN 1.108, 36280

Learn More
College of Liberal Arts

FR 324L Practical Phonetics (David Birdsong)

11am - 12:30pm
HRH 4.102B

Learn More
College of Liberal Arts

This is a card.

It has an easy to override visual style, and is appropriately subdued.

Learn More
College of Liberal Arts

This is a card.

It has an easy to override visual style, and is appropriately subdued.

Learn More
College of Liberal Arts

This is a card.

It has an easy to override visual style, and is appropriately subdued.

Learn More
College of Liberal Arts

This is a card.

It has an easy to override visual style, and is appropriately subdued.

Learn More
College of Liberal Arts

This is a card.

It has an easy to override visual style, and is appropriately subdued.

Learn More
College of Liberal Arts

This is a card.

It has an easy to override visual style, and is appropriately subdued.

Learn More
College of Liberal Arts

FR 320E Advanced French I (Instructor varies)

All Sections on MWF:
9am - 10am, MEZ 2.118, 36250
10am - 11am, MEZ 1.202, 36255
11am - 12pm, GAR 0.132, 36260
12pm - 1pm, MEZ 2.122, 36265

Learn More
College of Liberal Arts

FR 322E Advanced French II (Instructor varies)

All Sections on MWF:
10am - 11am PAR 304, 36270
12pm - 1pm MEZ 1.208, 36275
2pm - 3pm BEN 1.108, 36280

Learn More
College of Liberal Arts

FR 324L Practical Phonetics (David Birdsong)

11am - 12:30pm
HRH 4.102B

Learn More
College of Liberal Arts

This is a card.

It has an easy to override visual style, and is appropriately subdued.

Learn More
College of Liberal Arts

This is a card.

It has an easy to override visual style, and is appropriately subdued.

Learn More
College of Liberal Arts

This is a card.

It has an easy to override visual style, and is appropriately subdued.

Learn More
College of Liberal Arts

This is a card.

It has an easy to override visual style, and is appropriately subdued.

Learn More
College of Liberal Arts

This is a card.

It has an easy to override visual style, and is appropriately subdued.

Learn More
College of Liberal Arts

This is a card.

It has an easy to override visual style, and is appropriately subdued.

Learn More
College of Liberal Arts

FR 320E Advanced French I (Instructor varies)

All Sections on MWF:
9am - 10am, MEZ 2.118, 36250
10am - 11am, MEZ 1.202, 36255
11am - 12pm, GAR 0.132, 36260
12pm - 1pm, MEZ 2.122, 36265

Learn More
College of Liberal Arts

FR 322E Advanced French II (Instructor varies)

All Sections on MWF:
10am - 11am PAR 304, 36270
12pm - 1pm MEZ 1.208, 36275
2pm - 3pm BEN 1.108, 36280

Learn More
College of Liberal Arts

FR 324L Practical Phonetics (David Birdsong)

11am - 12:30pm
HRH 4.102B

Learn More
College of Liberal Arts

This is a card.

It has an easy to override visual style, and is appropriately subdued.

Learn More
College of Liberal Arts

This is a card.

It has an easy to override visual style, and is appropriately subdued.

Learn More
College of Liberal Arts

This is a card.

It has an easy to override visual style, and is appropriately subdued.

Learn More
College of Liberal Arts

This is a card.

It has an easy to override visual style, and is appropriately subdued.

Learn More
College of Liberal Arts

This is a card.

It has an easy to override visual style, and is appropriately subdued.

Learn More
College of Liberal Arts

This is a card.

It has an easy to override visual style, and is appropriately subdued.

Learn More

FR 320E Advanced French I (Instructor varies)

All Sections on MWF:
9am - 10am, MEZ 2.118, 36615
11am - 12pm, HRH 4.102B, 36620
12pm - 1pm, PAR 304, 36625
1pm - 2pm, PAR 304, 36630
(pdf)

This advanced language course’s goal is to substantially advance your spoken, written and listening skills in French while discussion controversial social topics in France and in the United States such as the effects of social media in interpersonal relationships, gender equality, and the limits of personal freedoms. There will be 3 written exams, 3 debates, 3 major written assignments based on the 3 themes of the course and a final project.

FR 320E is a fast-paced challenging course that requires extensive outside of class preparation in order to succeed in improving your vocabulary and grammar level (2-3 hours of preparation for each hour we meet is normal at the beginning). The prerequisite for FR 320E is FR 317C with at least a grade of C. If you received a C- in FR 317C, you do NOT meet the prerequisite for this course. This course carries the Writing flag.

The Lower-Division Grading Scale for French is the following:
97-93 A
92-90 A-
89-87 B+
86-83 B
82-80 B-
79-77 C+
76-73 C
72-70 C-
69-67 D+
66-63 D
62-60 D-
Less than 60 F

Learn More
College of Liberal Arts

FR 322E Advanced French II (Instructor varies)

All Sections on MWF:
10am - 11am PAR 308, 36635
12pm - 1pm HRH 4.102B, 36640
12pm - 1pm MEZ 1.212, 36645
(pdf)
This advanced language course’s goal is to substantially advance your spoken, written and listening skills in French while discussion controversial social topics both in the Francophone world and in the United States such as the effects of globalization in the world, conflicts regarding immigration, and the loss of indigenous cultures and languages due to colonialism/imperialism. There will be 3 written exams, 4 oral exams (2 individual presentations and 2 debates), 2 major written assignments based on 2 of the themes of the course and a final project.

FR 322E is a fast-paced challenging course that requires extensive outside of class preparation in order to succeed in improving your vocabulary and grammar level (2-3 hours of preparation for each hour we meet is normal at the beginning). The prerequisite for FR 322E is FR 320E with at least a grade of C. If you received a C- in FR 320E, you do NOT meet the prerequisite for this course. This course carries the Global Cultures flag.

The Lower-Division Grading Scale for French is the following:
97-93 A
92-90 A-
89-87 B+
86-83 B
82-80 B-
79-77 C+
76-73 C
72-70 C-
69-67 D+
66-63 D
62-60 D-
Less than 60 F

Learn More
College of Liberal Arts

FR 324L Practical Phonetics

Barbara Bullock  
bbullock@austin.utexas.edu
TTH 11am - 12:30pm
MEZ B0.302
(pdf)
This introduction to French phonetics provides students with a structured and practical understanding of the French sound system. The basics of descriptive phonetics and phonetic transcription are taught. Pronunciation and discrimination exercises emphasize individual sounds such as nasal vowels and the [u]-[y] contrast, as well as prosodic features (intonation, syllabification, liaison, etc.). The class is conducted in French.

The course is organized around:
Descriptive linguistics. Our text materials and classroom sessions provide descriptions and examples of essential features of French speech, such as l’assimilation, l’enchaînement, la syllabation, la ‘loi de position’, la dénasalisation, etc.

Practice in pronunciation and discrimination. With opportunities to apply your knowledge of linguistic description and phonetic transcription, you practice and sharpen your pronunciation and auditory discrimination of French sounds.

Improvement. Ten percent of your final grade is determined by your improvement over the course of the semester. Improvement is measured in part by comparing your reading aloud of a Diagnostic Exercise at the beginning of the term with your reading of similar material at the end of the term.

Learn More
College of Liberal Arts

FR 325C Crisis & Conflict

Marc Bizer 
mbizer@utexas.edu
TTH 2pm-3:30pm
HRH 4.102B
(pdf)
FR 325C, “Crisis and Conflict,” focuses on historical and social conflicts as primarily manifested in texts, by which we mean: novel, poetry, essays, but also film, music and art.
Themes deal specifically with moments of crisis (involving language, race, ethnic, gender, class, religious and national identity) in the history of francophone countries in Africa.

Instruction will emphasize strategies of reading and interpreting texts. In this particular course section, we will explore the ways in which writers, musicians and filmmakers raise awareness about the consequences of social conflicts and human rights violations in post-independence African francophone countries.

We will deal with such themes by studying an assortment of texts and genres from 1960 to the present.

Class time will not simply focus on the comprehension of texts, but rather, on their interpretation, so as to emphasize the way you can engage with them as a group. Interpretation being a subjective term, each course participant must come ready and prepared to engage critically with the material. If each discussion shall be guided and contextualized by the professor, the notion of exchange is primordial. Asking questions, sharing ideas and challenging conventional knowledge are all imperative tasks you will pursue during the semester.

Student Learning Outcomes:
1. Students will be able to analyze and explain the interaction between different cultural and historical crises and conflicts and the texts studied.

2. Students will be able to demonstrate comprehension of main ideas in a variety of literary genres, even when something unexpected is expressed (interpretive reading, Advanced-Low on the ACTFL proficiency scale: https://www.actfl.org/sites/default/files/pdfs/Can-Do_Statements_2015.pdf).

3. Students will be able to respond critically to the studied texts in various time-frames (presentational writing, Advanced-Low on the ACTFL proficiency scale:  https://www.actfl.org/sites/default/files/pdfs/Can-Do_Statements_2015.pdf). 

Learn More
College of Liberal Arts

FR 328C French Through Film

Heather Pelletier 
hpelletier@austin.utexas.edu
MWF 10am - 11am
MEZ 1.122 
(pdf)
Film provides a rich opportunity for enhancing language proficiency by presenting cultural topics and issues through an artistic and visual medium that is both engaging and produced in the target language. We will explore questions and themes arising from the films while also acquiring new vocabulary and reviewing grammatical structures needed for discussions. Students will write short papers and participate in a variety of oral presentations such as skits, dialogues, and interviews. This course carries the global cultures flag. Students must have completed FR 320E or have equivalent credit to enroll.

Learn More
College of Liberal Arts

FR 350F Francophone Lit and Culture

Mélanie Lamotte
MW 2:30 - 4:00pm
PMA 5.122
(pdf)

Explore the francophone world through novels, poetry, theater, and film. This survey course explores francophone literatures, cultural productions and political movements from the sixteenth century to the present. We will explore the common historical roots and shared challenges of the Francophone world. The main message of this course is that colonized people in the Francophone world have forged rich and diverse cultures and intellectual lives despite the immense challenges they have faced. Our discussions will cover a wide range of issues, including colonialism and anticolonialism, gender and race, decolonization, independence, the Francophonie, immigration, laïcité and the banlieues.

Prerequisite: Upper-division standing and one of the following with a grade of at least C: French 325C, 325D, or 325E.

Learn More
College of Liberal Arts

FR 351C Narrating Multilingual Self

Carl Blyth  
cblyth@austin.utexas.edu
TTH 9:30a - 11am
PAR 303
(pdf)

This course has 4 goals: 1. Master the vocabulary and styles of culinary discourse across different eras. 2. Mettre la main à la pâte by preparing French cuisine yourself! 3. Understand the major stages in the history of French cuisine 4. Grasp the relationship between the history of gastronomy and more general historical and cultural phenomena. This course carries the Global Cultures flag.

Learn More
College of Liberal Arts

FR 358C Cinema & Memory

Hervé Picherit 
picherit@utexas.edu 
MW 11:30am-1pm
HRH 2.112
(pdf)

From the fantasy of total recall, to the historical reach of documentary, the medium of film shares a unique relationship with the human faculty of memory. Does cinema capture the past accurately? Or is it subject to the same distortions and erasures as memory? More troubling yet, might cinematic memory be even less stable than human recollection? In this course, we will examine film's relationship with the past, we will compare French and American representations of memory through cinema, and we will consider the medium's role in representation individual recollection, collective rememberance, and historical recall.

Learn More
College of Liberal Arts

FR 325D Self and Society

Instructor: TBD
MW 1:00 - 2:30pm
PMA 5.126
(pdf)

FR 325D, “Self and Society,” focuses on narrative voices and representations of different individuals struggling to overcome or comprehend constraints imposed by society. In addition to examining how these struggles contribute to the literary style of authors, students may also explore the expression of personal experience in their own writing. Instruction will emphasize strategies of reading and interpreting texts. We will focus on how the conception of the self as it emerged and developed in relation to a changing French society.

Student Learning Outcomes:
1. Students will be able to identify elements of rhetoric that contribute to the construction of representations of the “self” in a range of literary genres.
2. Students will be able to demonstrate comprehension of main ideas in a variety of literary genres, even when something unexpected is expressed. (interpretive reading, Advanced-Low)
3. Students will be able to relate the content and/or style of the studied texts to their own experience in various time-frames (presentational writing, Advanced-Low).

Learn More
College of Liberal Arts

FR 329C French Through Music

Instructor: TBD
MWF 11:00am - 12pm
PAR 303
(pdf)
FR329C, “French Through Music,” is an upper-division French course designed to allow practice and refinement of French skills (reading, writing, speaking, and listening) through French-language music in a historical context. Music provides a rich opportunity for enhancing language proficiency by presenting cultural topics and issues through an artistic medium that is both engaging and produced in the target language. We will analyze different genres of French music in a historical setting from the Middle Age troubadours to today’s Daft Punk’s electronic music and Gims rap/hip hop, while also acquiring new
vocabulary and reviewing grammatical structures needed for discussions. Students will participate in short oral presentations, which will add to the course content. There will be frequent in-class assignments based on different artists, musical genres, historical periods and readings, as well as 2 written exams. There will be 2 in-class presentations, a 3-5 minute one and a 7-10 minute one. Students will be expected to write 2 short essays (music responses) and 1 longer paper (artist review). The music responses are short reflections (250-300 words) on 2 artists and/or genres discussed from 2 different time periods. The artist review is a longer written assignment (1000- 1200 words) where
you will present an organized analysis of a specific artist in his/her specific historical setting from a different time period as your 2 music responses and oral presentations. The 2 exams will test your knowledge of French history as well as the discussed artists and music genres as they pertain to this course. The final music video project will be based on a specific time period and is a short (5-7 minutes) “music video” (group of 3 students) that engages with the course theme of music and history.

Learn More
College of Liberal Arts

FC 342 French through Coding

Barbara Bullock  
bbullock@austin.utexas.edu
T/TH 12:30 - 2:00pm
MEZ 1.204
(pdf)
I. Course Description
When we are learning (or teaching) a new language, we tend to rely on ‘rules’: how to conjugate verbs, how to mark gender and number agreement, how to make complex sentences, ask questions, give commands, talk about hypothetical event and states, etc. But where do these rules come from and why are some of them so strange and complex? Do language users follow all these rules? How do we learn about what people really do when they are using their language? And what about people using the same language in different social and regional contexts? Or from different times and places? This course, taught in English, aims to provide you with the tools to independently investigate the strange and wondrous aspects of the French language that interest you. FC342 satisfies the Independent Inquiry Flag.

II. Course objectives and expectations
The goal of this course is to acquire basic computational skills to automatically process language so that you can independently explore actual French language usage. At the same time, we’ll be learning a lot about what French is really like these days. This is also an experiential learning class; you’ll be reflecting on your learning and, by the end of the course, you will have multiple learning products to pass on to others interested in how French works. You will contribute to the open science community by sharing your code with others and you’ll also create a poster to present your work and you’ll reflect on your learning in a blog post.

Learning Outcomes: By the end of the semester you should be able to:
1. Use Python to download, clean, and process French language data.
2. Articulate the difference between a normative and a descriptive approach to French grammar.
3. Describe the factors that drive language variation and change in contemporary French.
4. Contribute new findings about real French language use from your own work.
5. Use Jupyter Notebooks to share your code and markdown with others.
6. Disseminate your findings to different audiences in different formats

Learn More
College of Liberal Arts

F C 341 Arab Francophonie 

Emily Drumsta 
drumsta@austin.utexas.edu
MWF 11a-12p
PAR 308
(pdf)
In this class, we will explore French-language cultural productions by authors of Arab origin from across France's former colonial and mandate territories, including Morocco, Algeria, Tunisia, Syria, and Lebanon. In dialogue with postcolonial theory, we will study the fraught relationship many of these authors have with French language, literature, and culture: for many, a sign of colonial oppression, but also a gateway to global connections beyond the Arab world, including South-South connections with Africa, the Carribean, and Southeast Asia. 

Learn More
College of Liberal Arts

ITL 320 Advanced Italian

Instructor Varies
MWF 12pm-1pm
(pdf)
Italian 320 is conducted entirely in Italian and it is designed to improve skills in speaking and writing, as well as to advance reading and listening comprehension. We will expand on the knowledge of Italian culture using a variety of resources: pieces of literature and art, online articles and YouTube videos, streaming movies and TV shows, social media and memes.


Learn More
College of Liberal Arts

ITL 321 Narrating Woman from Dante to Igiaba Scego: An Introduction to Italian Literature 

Daniela Bini
bini@austin.utexas.edu
TTh 2pm - 3:30pm
(pdf)
From Dante Alighieri to Igiaba Scego, this course will introduce students to many great texts of Italian literature! In particular, students will read and discuss how women have been and are represented in Italian fiction and poetry beginning with the idealized woman-angel of the Middle Ages to today, both by male and female authors. Other authors include Francesco Petrarca, Giovanni Boccaccio, Vittoria Colonna, Giacomo Leopardi, Luigi Pirandello, Elsa Morante, Anna Maria Ortese, Natalia Ginzburg, Dacia Maraini, Italo Calvino, and Eugenio Montale.

Learn More
College of Liberal Arts

ITL 349P Italian Internship

Amanda Bush
amanda.bush@utexas.edu 
M 2pm - 4pm 
UTC 4.114
(pdf)
Q: What do all these companies have in common?
A: They've agreed to work with Italian-speaking interns from UT!
Are you ready to bring your Italian to work?
Check out our internship course for valuable professionalization in an "Italian-centric" business in Texas and beyond!
Contact Professor Amanda Bush to set up your internship & enroll!

Learn More
College of Liberal Arts

ITC 330 Ferrante Fever: Lit, Film and TV

Arianna Avalle 
arianna.avalle@utexas.edu
TTH 11:00am - 12:30pm
PAR 10
(pdf)
In this course, we will explore the Neapolitan world of Elena Ferrante, a global literary sensation and a new powerful female voice in Italian literature. We will read her international best-selling quadrilogy, the Neapolitan Novels, which trace the lifelong friendship of two Neapolitan girls from 1950s to the 21st century. We will also watch the HBO/Rai TV series "My Brilliant Friend", comparing with other Italian media products and with Ferrante previous works.
This course carries a Global Cultures Flag. 

Learn More
College of Liberal Arts

ITC 338 Italian Television Advertising

Cinzia Russi 
russi@austin.utexas.edu
TTH 9:30am-11am
(pdf)
Italy is a country associated with “style” – life style (il dolce far niente), fashion style (Valentino, Prada, Gucci, etc.), film style (Fellini and the like), and, for better or for worse, a certain sort of rather effusive political style (Mussolini, Berlusconi, and their ilk, among others). The specific objective of this course is to categorize and analyze the major changes that have taken place in the peculiarly Italian style of television advertising since the late 1950s.
After a general introduction to the language of television advertising, students will compare chronologically ordered versions of Italian TV commercials for a variety of high-use products (food items, house-cleaning products, personal care items, cars) in order to identify changes that have taken place at the level of vocabulary, grammar, and language register as a result of new sociocultural dynamics that have come to characterize present-day Italy. The Italian commercials will then be compared to/contrasted with equivalent ads broadcasted in US to uncover similarities and differences.
Although the course will focus on language change, it will also draw attention to socio-cultural changes that have taken place in the Italian society since the second half of the twentieth century, particularly with respect to the role and figure of women (and how they are portrayed in TV commercials vis-à-vis to men), and the structure, life style and values of the ‘typical’ (or ‘stereotypical’) Italian family.

Learn More
College of Liberal Arts

FR 320E Advanced French I (Instructor varies)

All Sections on MWF:
9am - 10am, MEZ 2.118, 36250
10am - 11am, MEZ 1.202, 36255
11am - 12pm, GAR 0.132, 36260
12pm - 1pm, MEZ 2.122, 36265
(pdf)
This advanced language course’s goal is to substantially advance your spoken, written and listening skills in French while discussion controversial social topics in France and in the United States such as the effects of social media in interpersonal relationships, gender equality, and the limits of personal freedoms. There will be 3 written exams, 3 debates, 3 major written assignments based on the 3 themes of the course and a final project.
FR 320E is a fast-paced challenging course that requires extensive outside of class preparation in order to succeed in improving your vocabulary and grammar level (2-3 hours of preparation for each hour we meet is normal at the beginning). The prerequisite for FR 320E is FR 317C with at least a grade of C. If you received a C- in FR 317C, you do NOT meet the prerequisite for this course. This course carries the Writing flag.

Learn More
College of Liberal Arts

FR 322E Advanced French II (Instructor varies)

All Sections on MWF:
10am - 11am PAR 304, 36270
12pm - 1pm MEZ 1.208, 36275
2pm - 3pm BEN 1.108, 36280
(pdf)

This advanced language course’s goal is to substantially advance your spoken, written and listening skills in French while discussion controversial social topics both in the Francophone world and in the United States such as the effects of globalization in the world, conflicts regarding immigration, and the loss of indigenous cultures and languages due to colonialism/imperialism. There will be 3 written exams, 4 oral exams (2 individual presentations and 2 debates), 2 major written assignments based on 2 of the themes of the course and a final project.

FR 322E is a fast-paced challenging course that requires extensive outside of class preparation in order to succeed in improving your vocabulary and grammar level (2-3 hours of preparation for each hour we meet is normal at the beginning). The prerequisite for FR 322E is FR 320E with at least a grade of C. If you received a C- in FR 320E, you do NOT meet the prerequisite for this course. This course carries the Global Cultures flag.

Learn More
College of Liberal Arts

FR 324L Practical Phonetics

David P. Birdsong  
birdsong@austin.utexas.edu
11am - 12:30pm
GAR 1.126
(pdf)
This introduction to French phonetics provides students with a structured and practical understanding of the French sound system. The basics of descriptive phonetics and phonetic transcription are taught. Pronunciation and discrimination exercises emphasize individual sounds such as nasal vowels and the [u]-[y] contrast, as well as prosodic features (intonation, syllabification, liaison, etc.). The class is conducted in French.
The course is organized around:
Descriptive linguistics. Our text materials and classroom sessions provide descriptions and examples of essential features of French speech, such as l’assimilation, l’enchaînement, la syllabation, la ‘loi de position’, la dénasalisation, etc.
Practice in pronunciation and discrimination. With opportunities to apply your knowledge of linguistic description and phonetic transcription, you practice and sharpen your pronunciation and auditory discrimination of French sounds.
Improvement. Ten percent of your final grade is determined by your improvement over the course of the semester. Improvement is measured in part by comparing your reading aloud of a Diagnostic Exercise at the beginning of the term with your reading of similar material at the end of the term.
Back to top.  

Learn More
College of Liberal Arts

FR 325C Crisis & Conflict

Dr. Daniel Kahozi 
danielkahozi@utexas.edu
MWF 11am-12pm
GDC 2.210
(pdf)
FR 325C, “Crisis and Conflict,” focuses on historical and social conflicts as primarily manifested in texts, by which we mean: novel, poetry, essays, but also film, music and art.
Themes deal specifically with moments of crisis (involving language, race, ethnic, gender, class, religious and national identity) in the history of francophone countries in Africa.
Instruction will emphasize strategies of reading and interpreting texts. In this particular course section, we will explore the ways in which writers, musicians and filmmakers raise awareness about the consequences of social conflicts and human rights violations in post-independence African francophone countries.
We will deal with such themes by studying an assortment of texts and genres from 1960 to the present.
Class time will not simply focus on the comprehension of texts, but rather, on their interpretation, so as to emphasize the way you can engage with them as a group. Interpretation being a subjective term, each course participant must come ready and prepared to engage critically with the material. If each discussion shall be guided and contextualized by the professor, the notion of exchange is primordial. Asking questions, sharing ideas and challenging conventional knowledge are all imperative tasks you will pursue during the semester.
Student Learning Outcomes:
1. Students will be able to analyze and explain the interaction between different cultural and historical crises and conflicts and the texts studied.
2. Students will be able to demonstrate comprehension of main ideas in a variety of literary genres, even when something unexpected is expressed (interpretive reading, Advanced-Low on the ACTFL proficiency scale: https://www.actfl.org/sites/default/files/pdfs/Can-Do_Statements_2015.pdf).
3. Students will be able to respond critically to the studied texts in various time-frames (presentational writing, Advanced-Low on the ACTFL proficiency scale:  https://www.actfl.org/sites/default/files/pdfs/Can-Do_Statements_2015.pdf)

Learn More
College of Liberal Arts

FR 325E Representing Difference in France, Middle Ages to the Present

Marc Bizer  
mbizer@utexas.edu
TTH 9:30 - 11am
MEZ 1.208 
(pdf)
In this course we will be looking at cultural documents (texts, films) covering the Middle Ages through the 21st century in order to examine the representations of groups in France whose shared religion, ethnicity, social class, and gender makes them seem fundamentally different from more dominant counterparts. We will study how the marginalized are seen by the dominant group (from without) but also how the dominant group(s) are seen by the marginalized (from within), along with self-representations of the marginalized. The goal will be to arrive at a better understanding of the different purposes that these representations serve: marginalization and oppression to be sure, but also self-satire and identity formation. This course carries the Global Cultures flag.

Learn More
College of Liberal Arts

FR 327C French Through Cuisine

Marc Bizer  
mbizer@utexas.edu
TTH 12:30 - 2pm
MEZ B0.302
(pdf)
This course has 4 goals: 1. Master the vocabulary and styles of culinary discourse across different eras. 2. Mettre la main à la pâte by preparing French cuisine yourself! 3. Understand the major stages in the history of French cuisine 4. Grasp the relationship between the history of gastronomy and more general historical and cultural phenomena. This course carries the Global Cultures flag.

Learn More
College of Liberal Arts

FR 330K The Joy of French

Dr. David Birdsong 
birdsong@austin.utexas.edu 
TTH 2pm-3:30pm
BEN 1.102
(pdf)

How many rhyming expressions are there in French to tell someone to chill out? (The number will surprise you!) In French, how do you convey attraction and affection, disdain and disgust, virtue and vulgarity? In what ways do people create humor with the French language, and how can you enjoy and appreciate French linguistic humor yourself?
How are new words formed in French? How do words and expressions from English make their way into the French language? What grammatical and lexical “errors” (non-standard features of language) are made by nearly all French speakers – and are markers of “nativeness”)?
Did you know that there are 52 different ways that the [u] sound can be spelled in French? Did you know that the French noun amour is masculine in the singular form, and feminine in the plural? What is the origin of the word chef, and why should this be of interest to a cattle owner, a governor, or a financier? What makes the verbs gésir and résoudre special?
As the above questions and the course title suggest, the goal of this course is to acquaint students with facts and features of the French language that make it fascinating and fun. In so doing, students will increase and refine their knowledge of French, enhance their French speaking, reading and writing proficiencies, and learn techniques for linguistic analysis and creativity. Illuminating examples will be taken from French film, music and literature. For illustrative purposes, occasional comparisons and contrasts with English and other languages will be made.

Texts (tentative list)
Un bonbon sur la langue, by Muriel Gilbert (La Librairie Vuibert)
Dictionnaire des difficultés de la langue française, by Adolphe V. Thomas (Larousse)
Allons-y, Alonzo! by Marie Treps (Seuil)
Online materials and Canvas postings

Learn More
College of Liberal Arts

FR 349P French Internship

Dr. Heather Pelletier 
hpelletier@austin.utexas.edu
(pdf)
 
Are you interested in earning upper-division course credit in French through an experiential learning experience?  In spring 2022, the Department of French & Italian will offer a French Internship course (FR 349P).  Enrolled students will complete 10-12 hours per week at their internship site (Texas-based francophone or French-affiliated organizations such as the European American Chamber of Commerce or the Délégation du Québec) as well as attend an in-person professional skills seminar at UT taught in French. Through this internship, you can establish professional connections, develop or enhance transferable job skills, practice your French, and earn course credit.  FR 349P is open to all Liberal Arts majors who have met the prerequisite of FR 322E, a minimum 3.0 GPA, and consent of the department. 
For more information or to apply, please contact French internship coordinator Heather Pelletier (hpelletier@austin.utexas.edu).  In order to begin the process of finding a suitable internship, please contact Dr. Pelletier as soon as possible during the fall 2021 semester.

Learn More
College of Liberal Arts

FR 372 Comparative Stylistics

Kate Nelson  
katenelson@utexas.edu
TTH 11am - 12:30pm
HRH 4.102B
(pdf)
What can French do differently than English? How can you employ these differences to create subtleties of meaning? In this class, we will answer these questions by analyzing the grammatical, rhetorical, and stylistic habits of each language. This will certainly lead us into the nuances of translation, but this class will also focus on self-expression, allowing you the space to learn and craft your written French to creatively convey your message. This course carries a Writing flag.

Learn More
College of Liberal Arts

F C 341 Americans in Paris 

I am required.

Learn More
College of Liberal Arts

ITL 320 Advanced Italian

Francesca Beretta
francesca.beretta@utexas.edu
MWF 9am-10am
(pdf)
 
Italian 320 is conducted entirely in Italian and it is designed to improve skills in speaking and writing, as well as to advance reading and listening comprehension. We will expand on the knowledge of Italian culture using a variety of resources: pieces of literature and art, online articles and YouTube videos, streaming movies and TV shows, social media and memes.


Learn More
College of Liberal Arts

ITL 328 Composition and Conversation 

Prof. Antonella Del Fattore Olson 
adolson@austin.utexas.edu 
TTh 3:30pm-5pm
(pdf)
 
Course Objectives:
• To master the grammar and improve your writing and oral skills in Italian by reading and practicing
• To expand your knowledge on Italian cultural and social changes from post war years to current times.
• To build a community in which its members feel free to express and exchange their opinions, reflect upon them, and draw a connection between the past and the present.
This course is conducted in Italian. It will focus on reviewing grammatical structures, and exploring new ones, in a literary and contemporary context as well as learning specific cultural themes in relation to Italian history and social changes through readings, videos and films. Students will carry conversations with Italians through Talk Abroad.
*This course carries the Writing Flag*

Learn More
College of Liberal Arts

ITL 375 Writing Fascism, the War, the Resistance (Scrivere il Fascismo, la Guerra e la Resistenza)

Dr. Daniela Bini 
bini@austin.utexas.edu 
TTh 2pm-3:15pm 
HRH 2.112
(pdf)
 
Italian literature has been a manifestation of a cultural elite with little or no contact with the masses. The distance between the learned language, taught in school, and the many dialects, spoken in the various regions has contributed to the problem. It was precisely against this historical and social phenomenon that Antonio Gramsci waged his battle. Literature, that is rooted in the history and culture of a country, must maintain this contact with the social-historical forces that have formed it and aim at the improvement of those very forces. In the narrative production of the first half of the twentieth century, the literature of the war and of the Resistance, represents the best attempt to achieve such goal: writing in order to remember, to tell of a past experience made of mistakes and suffering, not only in order to exorcise it, but also in order to learn from it.
Placing them in their historical background, we will read the following novels and watch the following films dealing with the experience of the war, fascism and the resistance:
Novels
Ignazio Silone: Fontamara
Renata Viganò: L’Agnese va a morire
Cesare Pavese: La casa in collina
Italo Calvino: Il sentiero dei nidi di ragno
Primo Levi: Se questo è un uomo
Films
Roberto Rossellini: Roma città aperta
Roberto Rossellini: Paisà
Vittorio de Sica: Il Giardino dei Finzi-Contini
P. e V. Taviani: La notte di San Lorenzo
Ettore Scola: Una giornata particolare

Learn More
College of Liberal Arts

ITC 330 American Dante

Dr. Guy Raffa 
guyr@utexas.edu
TTH 12:30pm-2pm
BEN 1.126
(pdf)
 
“The hottest places in hell are reserved for those who, in times of great moral crisis, maintain their neutrality.” Although Dante never said these exact words, they effectively convey his contempt for people who refuse to take a stand on questions of moral, political, and social justice. Engaged readers have had good reason to quote the “Dante” line at pivotal moments in US history, from decisions about entering the two world wars to John F. Kennedy’s call to combat bigotry and Martin Luther King Jr’s plea to end the war in Vietnam. Black Lives Matter activists and the California governor therefore drew on an illustrious tradition when they cited the medieval Italian poet in the summer of 2020 to inspire action against systemic racism.
Political engagement with Dante in the United States dates to the mid 19th century—in the movement to abolish slavery and during the Civil War—and is just one of several major themes we will explore in this course on the Italian poet’s strong presence in American history and culture. Other Dantean personas examined across a wide range of media—literature, art, music, film, television, and video games—will include the lover, the showman, and the judge.

Learn More
College of Liberal Arts

ITC 339 Italian Cinema

Dr. Paola Bonifazio 
pbonifazio@austin.utexas.edu
TTH 11am-12:30pm
(also listed as RTF359 Italian Cinema)
(pdf)
 
From La dolce vita to the spaghetti westerns, from Neorealism to Euro-horror: in this course, students will study some of the masterpieces of World Cinema that were made in Italy. Sometimes more successful abroad than in Italy, these films will introduce students to the history of Italian cinema cultures from a global perspective.
Italian Cinema is a “Global Virtual Exchange Course” and includes a module on Italian stardom and celebrity taught in partnership with the University of Udine (Italy) faculty and students.
The course is taught in English and it carries an Independent Inquiry Flag and a Global Cultures Flag.

Learn More
College of Liberal Arts
College of Liberal Arts

Undergraduate Academic Advisor

frit-advising@utexas.edu
BEN 2.108
(Office open for brief questions only, T-Th 9am-12pm & 1pm-3pm)
Advising Sessions:
Appointment Request

Virtual Walk-In Availability
(no appointment necessary)

Learn More
College of Liberal Arts

Undergraduate Faculty Advisors

Undergraduate Italian Faculty Advisor
Antonella Del Fattore-Olson
HRH 2.106B (please email for availability)
adolson@austin.utexas.edu
Undergraduate French Faculty Advisor
Heather Pelletier
HRH 3.112A (please email for availability)
hpelletier@austin.utexas.edu

Learn More
College of Liberal Arts

This is a card.

It has an easy to override visual style, and is appropriately subdued.

Learn More
College of Liberal Arts

This is a card.

It has an easy to override visual style, and is appropriately subdued.

Learn More
College of Liberal Arts

This is a card.

It has an easy to override visual style, and is appropriately subdued.

Learn More
College of Liberal Arts

This is a card.

It has an easy to override visual style, and is appropriately subdued.

Learn More
College of Liberal Arts

This is a card.

It has an easy to override visual style, and is appropriately subdued.

Learn More
College of Liberal Arts

This is a card.

It has an easy to override visual style, and is appropriately subdued.

Learn More