Department of Mexican American and Latina/o Studies
Department of Mexican American and Latina/o Studies

Richard R. Flores


ProfessorPh.D., University of Texas at Austin

Richard R. Flores

Contact

Interests


Folklore and Expressive Culture of Greater Mexico; Anthropology of Symbols; Anthropology of Religion; Anthropology and History; and Critical Theory.

Biography


I am currently Senior Associate Dean for Academic Affairs for the College of Liberal Arts and Professor of Anthropology and Mexican American Studies at The University of Texas at Austin where I hold the C. B. Smith, Sr. Centennial Chair in U.S.-Mexico Relations. I work in the areas of critical theory, performance studies, semiotics, and historical and cultural anthropology. I am a native of San Antonio, Texas, and received my B.A. from the University of Notre Dame and Ph.D. from The University of Texas at Austin in 1989. I am the author of Remembering the Alamo: Memory, Modernity, and the Master Symbol (University of Texas Press, 2002), Los Pastores: History and Performance in the Mexican Shepherd’s Play of South Texas (Smithsonian Institution Press, 1995), editor of Adina De Zavala’s, History and Legends of the Alamo (Arte Público Press, 1996). In addition, I have published essays in American Ethnologist, Cultural Anthropology, American Literary History, Radical History Review, and in the edited volume, Latino Cultural Citizenship, published by Beacon Press.

In addition to my scholarly work, I have extensive experience in the area of curriculum development and international studies, particularly in Latin America and the Middle East. I oversee UTeach-Liberal Arts, the college's secondary teacher preparation program in social studies, English, and foreign languages. Related to this is the Muslim Histories and Cultures Program, an education program for high school social studies teachers. 

More recently, I have developed the college's new effort in international affairs, The Global Initiative for Education and Leadership. The initiative is a consortium of UT and partner units aimed at delivering educational and leadership training abroad.

Courses


MAS 307 • Intro To Mexican Amer Cul Stds

39550 • Fall 2019
Meets TTH 12:30PM-2:00PM GWB 1.130
CD

FLAGS:   CD

See syllabus.

MAS 361 • Cultural Studies Seminar

35635 • Spring 2007
Meets TTH 2:00PM-3:30PM UTC 4.120

A seminar for advanced undergraduates to hone reading and writing skills for graduate study. We will cover a range of materials  focusing on Mexican American and Latinx Cultural Studies Theories with emphasis on the politics of cultural production in the 21st century.  Students will complete independent research projects that include ethnographic field methods, media studies, archival work and more.

HMN 101 • Community Service

39360 • Spring 2006
Meets W 4:00PM-5:00PM PAR 8C
 
A Community Based Service Learning course in which students mentor elementary level students struggling with literacy through the SEAL student organization. This course will entail guest speakers, weekly discussion, weekly journal entries, and supplemental readings.
 

Students must be available from 2:45 to 4:45, once per week, on either Tuesday, Wednesday, or Thursday, to volunteer at their assigned school.

If you are interested, email davey.seal.literacy@gmail.com for approval and further information.

HMN 101 • Community Service

39059 • Fall 2005
Meets M 5:00PM-6:00PM CAL 200
 
A Community Based Service Learning course in which students mentor elementary level students struggling with literacy through the SEAL student organization. This course will entail guest speakers, weekly discussion, weekly journal entries, and supplemental readings.
 

Students must be available from 2:45 to 4:45, once per week, on either Tuesday, Wednesday, or Thursday, to volunteer at their assigned school.

If you are interested, email davey.seal.literacy@gmail.com for approval and further information.

HMN 101 • Community Service

37842 • Spring 2005
Meets W 4:00PM-5:00PM BEN 1.106
 
A Community Based Service Learning course in which students mentor elementary level students struggling with literacy through the SEAL student organization. This course will entail guest speakers, weekly discussion, weekly journal entries, and supplemental readings.
 

Students must be available from 2:45 to 4:45, once per week, on either Tuesday, Wednesday, or Thursday, to volunteer at their assigned school.

If you are interested, email davey.seal.literacy@gmail.com for approval and further information.

MAS 361 • Cultural Studies Seminar

31975 • Spring 2004
Meets TTH 2:00PM-3:30PM CBA 4.340
(also listed as ANT 324L)

A seminar for advanced undergraduates to hone reading and writing skills for graduate study. We will cover a range of materials  focusing on Mexican American and Latinx Cultural Studies Theories with emphasis on the politics of cultural production in the 21st century.  Students will complete independent research projects that include ethnographic field methods, media studies, archival work and more.

ANT 392M • Intro To Grad Social Anthro

27225 • Fall 2003
Meets TW 10:30AM-12:00PM EPS 1.130KA

This course introduces doctoral students to major texts in sociocultural theory that have been central to the development of the discipline of anthropology from its colonial roots in North America and Western Europe to the contemporary period. While not a comprehensive history of anthropological theory, this course provides a chronological and contextualized perspective as it explores and interprets the relationships between varying and, at times, competing theoretical, epistemological, and ethical claims on anthropology and related disciplines. Based on classical scholarship by some of the “founding fathers” of modern social science, this course traces parts of the genealogical trajectories taken by the anthropological study of culture and society. Following that intellectual legacy, this course asks a central question: How can we make sense of sociocultural anthropology as an academic discipline today? Problematizing the role the concept of “culture” has played in shaping the idea of the “field,” we will look at “location” as a principal site of epistemological limitation and possibility for anthropological research.

MAS 307 • Intro To Cultural Studies

32495 • Fall 2003
Meets TTH 2:00PM-3:30PM WEL 2.256
(also listed as ANT 310L)

FLAGS:   CD

See syllabus.

MAS F374 • Images Of Texas

84430 • Summer 2003
Meets MTWTHF 11:30AM-1:00PM UTC 3.132

Please check back for updates.

ANT 394M • Marxism And Expressive Cul

26510 • Spring 2003
Meets W 9:00AM-12:00PM EPS 1.130KA

 

 

MAS 361 • Cultural Studies Seminar

31670 • Spring 2003
Meets TTH 2:00PM-3:30PM CBA 4.340
(also listed as ANT 324L)

A seminar for advanced undergraduates to hone reading and writing skills for graduate study. We will cover a range of materials  focusing on Mexican American and Latinx Cultural Studies Theories with emphasis on the politics of cultural production in the 21st century.  Students will complete independent research projects that include ethnographic field methods, media studies, archival work and more.

ANT 392M • Intro To Grad Social Anthro

26890 • Fall 2002
Meets TW 10:30AM-12:00PM EPS 1.130KA

This course introduces doctoral students to major texts in sociocultural theory that have been central to the development of the discipline of anthropology from its colonial roots in North America and Western Europe to the contemporary period. While not a comprehensive history of anthropological theory, this course provides a chronological and contextualized perspective as it explores and interprets the relationships between varying and, at times, competing theoretical, epistemological, and ethical claims on anthropology and related disciplines. Based on classical scholarship by some of the “founding fathers” of modern social science, this course traces parts of the genealogical trajectories taken by the anthropological study of culture and society. Following that intellectual legacy, this course asks a central question: How can we make sense of sociocultural anthropology as an academic discipline today? Problematizing the role the concept of “culture” has played in shaping the idea of the “field,” we will look at “location” as a principal site of epistemological limitation and possibility for anthropological research.

MAS F374 • Images Of Texas

84503 • Summer 2002
Meets MTWTHF 11:30AM-1:00PM UTC 1.116

Please check back for updates.

ANT 394M • Borders, Borderlands, & Anthro

26705 • Spring 2002
Meets TH 9:00AM-12:00PM EPS 1.130KA

 

 

MAS 374 • Seminar In Cultural Studies

31675 • Spring 2002
Meets TTH 2:00PM-3:30PM CBA 4.342
(also listed as ANT 324L)

Please check back for updates.

ANT 392M • Intro To Grad Social Anthro

27365 • Fall 2001
Meets TW 10:30AM-12:00PM EPS 1.130KA

This course introduces doctoral students to major texts in sociocultural theory that have been central to the development of the discipline of anthropology from its colonial roots in North America and Western Europe to the contemporary period. While not a comprehensive history of anthropological theory, this course provides a chronological and contextualized perspective as it explores and interprets the relationships between varying and, at times, competing theoretical, epistemological, and ethical claims on anthropology and related disciplines. Based on classical scholarship by some of the “founding fathers” of modern social science, this course traces parts of the genealogical trajectories taken by the anthropological study of culture and society. Following that intellectual legacy, this course asks a central question: How can we make sense of sociocultural anthropology as an academic discipline today? Problematizing the role the concept of “culture” has played in shaping the idea of the “field,” we will look at “location” as a principal site of epistemological limitation and possibility for anthropological research.

MAS 307 • Intro To Cultural Studies

32440 • Fall 2001
Meets TTH 2:00PM-3:30PM UTC 1.118

FLAGS:   CD

See syllabus.

ANT F305 • Fundamentals Of Folklore

81905 • Summer 2001
Meets MTWTHF 2:30PM-4:00PM UTC 1.146
SB

The purpose of this course is to introduce the concept of culture as a crucial dimension of human life. Because we tend to think of thought and action as stemming from individual impulses, we find the notion of a shared, highly variable, but influential force in our lives hard to fathom.  Even if we speak of "society" as a familiar concept, we tend to make of it a uniform, oppressive force, some institution outside ourselves that we individually confront and oppose. Yet only if we can learn to recognize how deeply we share certain assumptions and inclinations with others--but only some others, and to varying degrees--can we appreciate the degree to which culture inheres within us and makes us who we are.

ANT 394M • Marxism And Expressive Cul

27045 • Spring 2001
Meets TH 9:00AM-12:00PM EPS 1.128

 

 

MAS 374 • Seminar In Cultural Studies

31655 • Spring 2001
Meets TTH 2:00PM-3:30PM CBA 4.342

Please check back for updates.

ANT 392M • Intro To Grad Social Anthro

27475 • Fall 2000
Meets T 9:00AM-12:00PM EPS 1.130KA

This course introduces doctoral students to major texts in sociocultural theory that have been central to the development of the discipline of anthropology from its colonial roots in North America and Western Europe to the contemporary period. While not a comprehensive history of anthropological theory, this course provides a chronological and contextualized perspective as it explores and interprets the relationships between varying and, at times, competing theoretical, epistemological, and ethical claims on anthropology and related disciplines. Based on classical scholarship by some of the “founding fathers” of modern social science, this course traces parts of the genealogical trajectories taken by the anthropological study of culture and society. Following that intellectual legacy, this course asks a central question: How can we make sense of sociocultural anthropology as an academic discipline today? Problematizing the role the concept of “culture” has played in shaping the idea of the “field,” we will look at “location” as a principal site of epistemological limitation and possibility for anthropological research.

MAS 307 • Intro To Cultural Studies

32085 • Fall 2000
Meets TTH 2:00PM-3:30PM UTC 1.146

FLAGS:   CD

See syllabus.

ANT S302 • Cultural Anthropology

82170 • Summer 2000
Meets MTWTHF 8:30AM-10:00AM WEL 2.304
SB

This course focuses on "classic" themes in anthropology such as ethnicity, language, adaptation, marriage, kinship, gender, religion, and social stratification.  We will consider anthropological theory from its 19th-century origins to the present.  The course also explores the nature of ethnographic field work, especially the relationship between the anthropologist and the field community.  
The lectures, readings, and films for this course have been selected with the objective of exploring the social meanings with which diverse groups invest their life.  By comparing and analyzing the similarities and differences between "us" and "others," both within the borders of the U.S. and abroad, the anthropological perspective can expose some of our own cultural assumptions and enable us to better understand diverse cultures.

ANT 392M • Intro To Grad Social Anthro

26540 • Spring 2000
Meets TH 9:00AM-12:00PM EPS 1.128

This course introduces doctoral students to major texts in sociocultural theory that have been central to the development of the discipline of anthropology from its colonial roots in North America and Western Europe to the contemporary period. While not a comprehensive history of anthropological theory, this course provides a chronological and contextualized perspective as it explores and interprets the relationships between varying and, at times, competing theoretical, epistemological, and ethical claims on anthropology and related disciplines. Based on classical scholarship by some of the “founding fathers” of modern social science, this course traces parts of the genealogical trajectories taken by the anthropological study of culture and society. Following that intellectual legacy, this course asks a central question: How can we make sense of sociocultural anthropology as an academic discipline today? Problematizing the role the concept of “culture” has played in shaping the idea of the “field,” we will look at “location” as a principal site of epistemological limitation and possibility for anthropological research.

MAS 374 • Cul/Represntatn/Mex Amer Exper

31465 • Spring 2000
Meets TTH 2:00PM-3:30PM WAG 420
(also listed as ANT 324L)

Please check back for updates.

Curriculum Vitae


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