Department of Rhetoric & Writing
Department of Rhetoric & Writing

Cindy-Lou Holland


Ph.D. Student
Cindy-Lou Holland

Contact

Interests


Cindy’s research interests include the critical posthumanities, Indigenous theories of agent ontology, and emergent figurations of subjectivity. She lives in a collaboratively built tiny house parked out in the country, where chickens, bobcats, dogs, coyotes, a husband, and bugs of startling size routinely make things happen.

Courses


RHE 315 • Intro To Visual Rhetoric-Wb

43700 • Spring 2021
Meets TTH 12:30PM-2:00PM
Internet; Synchronous
Wr

Photographs are a primary means of influencing the thoughts, feelings, and beliefs of humans in the modern world, but what is it about images that affects us so much? How are images so persuasive? Of course, their content is a factor, and additional layers of social meaning can contribute to an image’s force, but pictures have a suasive power all their own that goes beyond the power of their content. In this class we will take a deep dive into the structural logics of the picture-space and sensitize ourselves to the multiple layers of meaning that images use to persuade viewers. Students in the course will have the opportunity to make and analyze hundreds of images to help hone their observational skills, develop a “photographer’s eye,” and invent a picture-vocabulary. Studying visual rhetoric, in particular the rhetorical force of the picture-space, will help students understand why they themselves respond to certain kinds of images and why sending images out into the world should be considered an act with ethical implications.

RHE 309K • Rhetoric Of Creativity

43355 • Spring 2019
Meets TTH 11:00AM-12:30PM FAC 7
Wr

What IS creativity? Is it a character trait? Is it a process we engage in? Is it a mysterious muse that descends from on high? What are the implications of each of these ideas? Does it matter how we conceive of creativity? These questions will guide our study as we examine various popular and scientific theories of creativity and work to understand how these ideas might have influenced our thoughts about own creativity.

Over the semester we will explore methods of creative problem solving, including the Design Thinking model and divergent thinking activities. Students will keep a class journal to chronicle both their performance in each problem-scenario and their responses to the creative process. Then students will attempt to put these new and creative “ways of being” to use as they gather and track information (i.e. do research) about a creative person, event, act, or object of their choice. Thus, creativity will become both our subject matter and our approach to research. Students should expect to encounter moments of ambiguity and uncertainty in class every week, and should learn to recognize these as important aspects of both the writing (and the creative!) process.

Assignments

  • Journal Entries and Collaborative Paragraphing (3-4 per week)
  • Rhetorical Analysis (4-7 pages)
  • Research Project (written or multimodal) 

Grading

Students will receive instructor feedback on their written assignments, and then will evaluate their own writing and learning through a Learning Record. This means students will argue for a final grade and provide evidence to support their claim to that grade. The instructor will make the final decision of what grade to assign, honoring self-evaluations as much as possible.

 

Required Texts

  • They Say, I Say: The Moves that Matter in Academic Writing. Gerald Graff and Cathy Birkenstein.
  • The Storm of Creativity. Kyna Leski.

Additional readings provided via Canvas.

 

RHE 309K • Rhetoric Of Creativity

43705 • Fall 2018
Meets MW 11:30AM-1:00PM FAC 7
Wr

What IS creativity? Is it a character trait? Is it a process we engage in? Is it a mysterious muse that descends from on high? What are the implications of each of these ideas? Does it matter how we conceive of creativity? These questions will guide our study as we examine various popular and scientific theories of creativity and work to understand how these ideas might have influenced our thoughts about own creativity.

 

Over the semester we will explore methods of creative problem solving, including the Design Thinking model and divergent thinking activities. Students will keep a class journal to chronicle both their performance in each problem-scenario and their responses to the creative process. Then students will attempt to put these new and creative “ways of being” to use as they gather and track information (i.e. do research) about a creative person, event, act, or object of their choice. Thus, creativity will become both our subject matter and our approach to research. Students should expect to encounter moments of ambiguity and uncertainty in class every week, and should learn to recognize these as important aspects of both the writing (and the creative!) process.

 

Assignments

Journal Entries and Collaborative Paragraphing (3-4 per week)

Rhetorical Analysis (4-7 pages)

Research Project (written or multimodal)

 

 

Grading

Students will receive instructor feedback on their written assignments, and then will evaluate their own writing and learning through a Learning Record. This means students will argue for a final grade and provide evidence to support their claim to that grade. The instructor will make the final decision of what grade to assign, honoring self-evaluations as much as possible.

 

 

Required Texts

They Say, I Say: The Moves that Matter in Academic Writing. Gerald Graff and Cathy Birkenstein.

The Storm of Creativity. Kyna Leski.

 

Additional readings provided via Canvas.

RHE S309K • Rhetoric Of Creativity

84445 • Summer 2018
Meets MTWTHF 11:30AM-1:00PM PAR 206
Wr

What IS creativity? Is it a character trait? Is it a process we engage in? Is it a mysterious muse that descends from on high? What are the implications of each of these ideas? Does it matter how we conceive of creativity? These questions will guide our study as we examine various popular and scientific theories of creativity and work to understand how these ideas might have influenced our thoughts about own creativity.

Over the semester we will explore methods of creative problem solving, including the Design Thinking model and divergent thinking activities. Students will keep a class journal to chronicle both their performance in each problem-scenario and their responses to the creative process. Then students will attempt to put these new and creative “ways of being” to use as they gather and track information (i.e. do research) about a creative person, event, act, or object of their choice. Thus, creativity will become both our subject matter and our approach to research. Students should expect to encounter moments of ambiguity and uncertainty in class every week, and should learn to recognize these as important aspects of both the writing (and the creative!) process.

Assignments

  • Journal Entries and Collaborative Paragraphing (3-4 per week)
  • Rhetorical Analysis (4-7 pages)
  • Research Project (written or multimodal)

 

Grading

Students will receive instructor feedback on their written assignments, and then will evaluate their own writing and learning through a Learning Record. This means students will argue for a final grade and provide evidence to support their claim to that grade. The instructor will make the final decision of what grade to assign, honoring self-evaluations as much as possible.

 

Required Texts

  • They Say, I Say: The Moves that Matter in Academic Writing. Gerald Graff and Cathy Birkenstein.
  • The Storm of Creativity. Kyna Leski.

Additional readings provided via Canvas.

 

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