Department of Rhetoric & Writing
Department of Rhetoric & Writing

Emily Emison


Assistant Instructor

Contact

Courses


RHE 309K • Rhet Of Human Computation

43645 • Spring 2018
Meets TTH 3:30PM-5:00PM FAC 7
Wr

RHE 309K: Rhetoric of Human Computation

At the nexus of human talent and technological advancement lies human computation: the practice of using the processing power of people to solve problems and/or analyze data that computers cannot (yet) solve/analyze and, importantly, vice versa. This promising, problematic marriage of man and machine is not new—the prosthetic extension of ability via technology is at least as old as the wheel, the stylus, or the sundial. What is novel, however, is the massive scale on which these extensions are taking place in the 21st century.

"Rhetoric of Human Computation" is designed to bridge the gap between the anxious Luddites (whether self-styled or externally perceived) and the myopically optimistic practitioners by interrogating the central claims made about the relationship between human beings and computers. Students will gain a more nuanced understanding of this ongoing conversation's context by examining a variety of viewpoints and thinking critically about the rhetorical moves made by different texts (including non-written and born-digital texts). Arguments for and against many distinct approaches to human computation will be analyzed for their bias/credibility, intended audience(s), underlying assumptions, and appeals to the classical triad of ethos/pathos/logos. This course will ask students to read and write arguments about human computation but also, ultimately, to consider how “rhetorical” human-machine interaction is, in itself.

 

Major Assignments:

  •             Project 1: Annotated Bibliography (10%)

  •             Project 2: Rhetorical Analysis (10%)

  •             Project 2 Revision (15%)

  •             Project 3: Argument (10%)

  •             Project 3 Revision (15%)
  •             Project 4: Computational Translation (10%)

Shorter Assignments: Research Summaries 1-4 (15%)

Participation: Measured via Canvas Discussions and Quizzes (15%)

Instructor Conferences: For Projects 1 & 4 (Mandatory)

Peer Reviews: For Projects 2 & 3 (Mandatory)

 

IV. Course Readings

  • Graff, Gerald, and Cathy Birkenstein. They Say/I Say: The Moves that Matter in Academic Writing. 3rd        Edition.  New York: W. W. Norton & Company Inc., 2014.
  • Bullock, Richard, Michal Brody, and Francine Weinberg. The Little Longhorn Handbook. 2nd Edition.  New York: W. W. Norton & Company Inc., 2014.

 

Sample of additional readings and resources (to be posted on Canvas):

  • Marcus, Adam Marcus and Aditya Parameswaran. Crowdsourced Data Management: Industry and                    Academic Perspectives, "Human Computer Interaction," "Machine         Learning and Artificial            Intelligence," "Social Science," "Game Theory," and "Systems and Programming Models" (each      section is 2-3 pages, maximum).
  • Quinn, Alexander J. and Benjamin B. Bederson. "Human Computation: A Survey and Taxonomy of a      Growing Field."

RHE 309K • Rhet Of Human Computation

44095 • Fall 2017
Meets MW 2:30PM-4:00PM PAR 104
Wr

RHE 309K: Rhetoric of Human Computation

At the nexus of human talent and technological advancement lies human computation: the practice of using the processing power of people to solve problems and/or analyze data that computers cannot (yet) solve/analyze and, importantly, vice versa. This promising, problematic marriage of man and machine is not new—the prosthetic extension of ability via technology is at least as old as the wheel, the stylus, or the sundial. What is novel, however, is the massive scale on which these extensions are taking place in the 21st century.

"Rhetoric of Human Computation" is designed to bridge the gap between the anxious Luddites (whether self-styled or externally perceived) and the myopically optimistic practitioners by interrogating the central claims made about the relationship between human beings and computers. Students will gain a more nuanced understanding of this ongoing conversation's context by examining a variety of viewpoints and thinking critically about the rhetorical moves made by different texts (including non-written and born-digital texts). Arguments for and against many distinct approaches to human computation will be analyzed for their bias/credibility, intended audience(s), underlying assumptions, and appeals to the classical triad of ethos/pathos/logos. This course will ask students to read and write arguments about human computation but also, ultimately, to consider how “rhetorical” human-machine interaction is, in itself.

 

Major Assignments:

  •             Project 1: Annotated Bibliography (10%)

  •             Project 2: Rhetorical Analysis (10%)

  •             Project 2 Revision (15%)

  •             Project 3: Argument (10%)

  •             Project 3 Revision (15%)
  •             Project 4: Computational Translation (10%)

Shorter Assignments: Research Summaries 1-4 (15%)

Participation: Measured via Canvas Discussions and Quizzes (15%)

Instructor Conferences: For Projects 1 & 4 (Mandatory)

Peer Reviews: For Projects 2 & 3 (Mandatory)

 

IV. Course Readings

  • Graff, Gerald, and Cathy Birkenstein. They Say/I Say: The Moves that Matter in Academic Writing. 3rd        Edition.  New York: W. W. Norton & Company Inc., 2014.
  • Bullock, Richard, Michal Brody, and Francine Weinberg. The Little Longhorn Handbook. 2nd Edition.  New York: W. W. Norton & Company Inc., 2014.

 

Sample of additional readings and resources (to be posted on Canvas):

  • Marcus, Adam Marcus and Aditya Parameswaran. Crowdsourced Data Management: Industry and                    Academic Perspectives, "Human Computer Interaction," "Machine         Learning and Artificial            Intelligence," "Social Science," "Game Theory," and "Systems and Programming Models" (each      section is 2-3 pages, maximum).
  • Quinn, Alexander J. and Benjamin B. Bederson. "Human Computation: A Survey and Taxonomy of a      Growing Field."

Curriculum Vitae


Profile Pages