Department of Rhetoric & Writing
Department of Rhetoric & Writing

Stephen K. Dadugblor


The University of Texas at Austin

Assistant Instructor in the Department of Rhetoric & Writing

Contact

Biography


I am a doctoral candidate in the Department of Rhetoric and Writing at The University of Texas at Austin where I teach lower-division courses in rhetoric and writing. My research is situated at the intersection of cultural rhetorics, rhetorical genre studies, and public deliberation. Specifically, I investigate the ways that local African modes of rhetoric shape citizens’ abilities as civic actors within (borrowed) democratic institutions and non-institutional, digital spheres. I hold a B.A. in English and Sociology (First Class Honors) from the University of Ghana, and an MS in Rhetoric, Theory and Culture from Michigan Technological University. 

Courses


RHE 309K • Rhetoric Of Spying

43620 • Spring 2018
Meets TTH 12:30PM-2:00PM FAC 10
Wr

RHE 309K: Rhetoric of Spying

When, in June 2013, Edward Snowden admitted to leaking classified information from the United States’ National Security Administration (NSA), he confirmed what many people have for long suspected, or even probably known: We are secretly watched by our governments! Yet, while it is commonly believed that governments are mainly responsible for surveillance, recent developments in digital technologies have opened up possibilities to reconsider surveillance not only in terms of macro-, governmental levels of invasion of privacy, but also at the level of minute, everyday practices that we engage in as individuals. In what ways are we complicit in, desire, encourage, or resist being spied on in our everyday interaction with others?

In this class, we will focus on rhetoric as an entry point to exploring and analyzing the manifestations, contexts, controversies, and utility of surveillance in everyday life. Beyond secret, governmental surveillance, we will discuss how current digital technologies have extended the scope of surveillance to nearly every facet of our lives. Throughout this course, we will have the opportunity to critically engage with and analyze a variety of texts and situations, as well as research credible sources, and develop effective writing skills. Ultimately, we will consider how a culture of spying influences our notions of privacy, civil liberties, security, and truth-telling for the common good.

Course Materials

  • Routledge Handbook of Surveillance Studies, edited by David Lyon, Ball Kirstie and Kevin            Haggerty
  • Good Reasons: Researching and Writing Effective Arguments, 6th edition by Lester Faigley and         Jack Selzer
  • Easy Writer, 4th edition by Andrea Lunsford
  • Other relevant course materials will be provided on the course Canvas page.

Coursework and Grading

  • Project 1: Annotated Bibliography: 15%
  • Project 2.1: Rhetorical Analysis: 10%
  • Project 2.2: Rhetorical Analysis Revision: 15%
  • Project 3.1: Persuasive Argument: 15%
  • Project 3.2: Persuasive Argument Revision: 15%
  • Project 4: Infographic: 10%
  • Short Writing Assignments (Research Summaries & Final Project Proposal): 10%
  • Class Citizenship/Participation: 10% 

RHE 309K • Rhetoric Of Spying

44070 • Fall 2017
Meets TTH 12:30PM-2:00PM PAR 6
Wr

RHE 309K: Rhetoric of Spying

When, in June 2013, Edward Snowden admitted to leaking classified information from the United States’ National Security Administration (NSA), he confirmed what many people have for long suspected, or even probably known: We are secretly watched by our governments! Yet, while it is commonly believed that governments are mainly responsible for surveillance, recent developments in digital technologies have opened up possibilities to reconsider surveillance not only in terms of macro-, governmental levels of invasion of privacy, but also at the level of minute, everyday practices that we engage in as individuals. In what ways are we complicit in, desire, encourage, or resist being spied on in our everyday interaction with others?

In this class, we will focus on rhetoric as an entry point to exploring and analyzing the manifestations, contexts, controversies, and utility of surveillance in everyday life. Beyond secret, governmental surveillance, we will discuss how current digital technologies have extended the scope of surveillance to nearly every facet of our lives. Throughout this course, we will have the opportunity to critically engage with and analyze a variety of texts and situations, as well as research credible sources, and develop effective writing skills. Ultimately, we will consider how a culture of spying influences our notions of privacy, civil liberties, security, and truth-telling for the common good.

Course Materials

  • Routledge Handbook of Surveillance Studies, edited by David Lyon, Ball Kirstie and Kevin            Haggerty
  • Good Reasons: Researching and Writing Effective Arguments, 6th edition by Lester Faigley and         Jack Selzer
  • Easy Writer, 4th edition by Andrea Lunsford
  • Other relevant course materials will be provided on the course Canvas page.

Coursework and Grading

  • Project 1: Annotated Bibliography: 15%
  • Project 2.1: Rhetorical Analysis: 10%
  • Project 2.2: Rhetorical Analysis Revision: 15%
  • Project 3.1: Persuasive Argument: 15%
  • Project 3.2: Persuasive Argument Revision: 15%
  • Project 4: Infographic: 10%
  • Short Writing Assignments (Research Summaries & Final Project Proposal): 10%
  • Class Citizenship/Participation: 10% 

Curriculum Vitae


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