Department of Rhetoric & Writing
Department of Rhetoric & Writing

Tristan Hanson


MA - English Studies, Western Washington University

Assistant Instructor, PhD Student
Tristan Hanson

Contact

Interests


theories of space and place, field methods, visual rhetorics, new materialisms

Courses


RHE 309K • Rhetoric Of Comics

42810 • Spring 2020
Meets MW 1:00PM-2:30PM PAR 104
Wr

On November 2, 2011, the Paris headquarters of Charlie Hebdo, a French satirical magazine, was firebombed. Reportedly, the bombing was a response to an as yet unpublished issue of the magazine renamed “Charia Hebdo” and listing Muhammed, the founder and Prophet of Islam, as the “Editor-in-Chief.” Leaked in advance of publication, the cover of the issue featured a cartoon caricature of Muhammad with a speech bubble that said (here translated from the French) “A hundred lashes if you don’t die laughing!” The same day as the bombing, Hebdo’s website was hacked and a message was left for the editor’s of the magazine: “You keep abusing, Islam’s almighty Prophet with disgusting and disgraceful cartoons using excuses of freedom of speech…. Be God’s Curse On You!” (my emphasis).

 

In making comics, creators—including writers, cartoonists, letterers, editors, etc.—have to make decisions about what to depict (“moment”), how to depict it (“framing” and “imaging”), how to caption that depiction (“word”), and in what sequence it should appear (“flow”) (thank you to Scott McCloud for the vocabulary). These decisions are essentially rhetorical in that they must always account for an audience of potential readers and the potential contexts in which they will be read. What the Charlie Hebdo incident described above shows is how important those decisions could potentially be. This course will ask you to explore the ways by which comics of all kinds move us, the ways by which they persuade us to think, feel, and act. It will ask you to think about how you might make comics move others, how you might make them act to change things in the world. Finally, it will ask you to use the rhetorical knowledge you gain from your explorations to create your own comic in an attempt to persuade others. While it may not be your purpose to incite anger or violence, or to “curse” someone, you will seek to harness the undeniable force of comics to do things. In the end, hopefully you will have a sense of how you might use comics as a force of responsible action and how it might inspire that same sense of responsibility in others.

Assignments:

  • Annotated Bibliography 5%
  • Topic Synthesis Paper 10%
  • Text-Image Juxtapositions 15%
  • Series Pitch 10% (written and presented)
  • Comics Script/Illustrated Comic 15%
  • Short Writing Assignments 10% (comic description, research summary, rhetorical analysis of primary source, rhetorical analysis of secondary source)
  • Participation 10% (discussion board posts, in-class writing assignments, peer reviews, etc.)
  • Revisions 25% (synthesis, text-image juxtapositions, comics script/illustrated script)

Required Text:

  • Understanding Rhetoric: A Graphic Guide to Writing, 2nd Edition by Elizabeth Losh, Jonathan Alexander, Kevin Cannon, and Zander Cannon

RHE 309K • Rhetoric Of Comics

42515 • Fall 2019
Meets TTH 12:30PM-2:00PM PAR 6
Wr

On November 2, 2011, the Paris headquarters of Charlie Hebdo, a French satirical magazine, was firebombed. Reportedly, the bombing was a response to an as yet unpublished issue of the magazine renamed “Charia Hebdo” and listing Muhammed, the founder and Prophet of Islam, as the “Editor-in-Chief.” Leaked in advance of publication, the cover of the issue featured a cartoon caricature of Muhammad with a speech bubble that said (here translated from the French) “A hundred lashes if you don’t die laughing!” The same day as the bombing, Hebdo’s website was hacked and a message was left for the editor’s of the magazine: “You keep abusing, Islam’s almighty Prophet with disgusting and disgraceful cartoons using excuses of freedom of speech…. Be God’s Curse On You!” (my emphasis).


In making comics, creators—including writers, cartoonists, letterers, editors, etc.—have to make decisions about what to depict (“moment”), how to depict it (“framing” and “imaging”), how to caption that depiction (“word”), and in what sequence it should appear (“flow”) (thank you to Scott McCloud for the vocabulary). These decisions are essentially rhetorical in that they must always account for an audience of potential readers and the potential contexts in which they will be read. What the Charlie Hebdo incident described above shows is how important those decisions could potentially be. This course will ask you to explore the ways by which comics of all kinds move us, the ways by which they persuade us to think, feel, and act. It will ask you to think about how you might make comics move others, how you might make them act to change things in the world. Finally, it will ask you to use the rhetorical knowledge you gain from your explorations to create your own comic in an attempt to persuade others. While it may not be your purpose to incite anger or violence, or to “curse” someone, you will seek to harness the undeniable force of comics to do things. In the end, hopefully you will have a sense of how you might use comics as a force of responsible action and how it might inspire that same sense of responsibility in others.

Assignments:

  • Annotated Bibliography 5%
  • Topic Synthesis Paper 10%
  • Text-Image Juxtapositions 15%
  • Series Pitch 10% (written and presented)
  • Comics Script/Illustrated Comic 15%
  • Short Writing Assignments 10% (comic description, research summary, rhetorical analysis of primary source, rhetorical analysis of secondary source)
  • Participation 10% (discussion board posts, in-class writing assignments, peer reviews, etc.)
  • Revisions 25% (synthesis, text-image juxtapositions, comics script/illustrated script)

Required Text:

  • Understanding Rhetoric: A Graphic Guide to Writing, 2nd Edition by Elizabeth Losh, Jonathan Alexander, Kevin Cannon, and Zander Cannon

RHE S306 • Rhetoric And Writing

83405 • Summer 2019
Meets MTWTHF 10:00AM-11:30AM SZB 422
C1

Multiple meeting times and sections. Please consult the Course Schedule for unique numbers.

This does NOT meet the Writing Flag requirement.

This composition course provides instruction in the gathering and evaluation of information and its presentation in well-organized expository prose. Students ordinarily write and revise four papers. The course includes instruction in invention, arrangement, logic, style, revision, and strategies of research.

Course centered around the First-Year Forum (FYF) selected readings. Students focus on the foundational knowledge and skills needed for college writing. In addition, they are introduced to basic rhetoric terms and learn to rhetorically analyze positions within controversies surrounding the FYF readings.

RHE 306 is required of all UT students. Contact the Measurement and Evaluation Center, 2616 Wichita (471-3032) to petition for RHE 306 credit.

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