American Studies
American Studies

AMS 310 • Intro To American Studies

31385 • McElroy, Erin
Meets TTH 2:00PM-3:30PM GAR 0.102
CD HI
show description

This class introduces students to the field of American Studies. The guiding objective of the class is to use interdisciplinary lenses – such as music, dance, material culture, and urban studies – to develop a more complex understanding of American culture. In this class, we will investigate select aspects of American culture using various methodological approaches. The course outline follows a semi-linear pattern in history, but is hardly comprehensive. We will look broadly at the tensions between individual identity formation and the many social constructions that operate in American culture. The class is loosely tied around the connection, or disconnection, of individuals with mass culture (music, in particular, but also cars, corporations, television, and even fashion).


AMS 310 • Intro To American Studies

31380 • Bendele, Marvin
Meets MW 1:00PM-2:30PM BEL 328
CD HI
show description

This class introduces students to the field of American Studies. The guiding objective of the class is to use interdisciplinary lenses – such as music, dance, material culture, and urban studies – to develop a more complex understanding of American culture. In this class, we will investigate select aspects of American culture using various methodological approaches. The course outline follows a semi-linear pattern in history, but is hardly comprehensive. We will look broadly at the tensions between individual identity formation and the many social constructions that operate in American culture. The class is loosely tied around the connection, or disconnection, of individuals with mass culture (music, in particular, but also cars, corporations, television, and even fashion).


AMS 311S • American Comics

31389 • Shook, Coyote
Meets MWF 11:00AM-12:00PM BUR 436B
Wr
show description

Writing, reading, and discussion on an American studies topic, with emphasis on the evaluation of information, analytical reading, and critical writing. Three lecture hours a week for one semester. May be repeated for credit when the topics vary.


AMS 311S • Beyond The End Of The World

31390 • Weissman, Cooper
Meets MWF 10:00AM-11:00AM BUR 436A
Wr
show description

Writing, reading, and discussion on an American studies topic, with emphasis on the evaluation of information, analytical reading, and critical writing. Three lecture hours a week for one semester. May be repeated for credit when the topics vary.


AMS 311S • From The Mind Of Jordan Peele

31395 • Ajani, Ja'Nell
Meets MWF 5:00PM-6:00PM BUR 436A
CDWr
show description

Writing, reading, and discussion on an American studies topic, with emphasis on the evaluation of information, analytical reading, and critical writing. Three lecture hours a week for one semester. May be repeated for credit when the topics vary.


AMS 311S • Haunting In American Culture

31400 • Genovese, Holly
Meets MWF 2:00PM-3:00PM BUR 436A
Wr
show description

Writing, reading, and discussion on an American studies topic, with emphasis on the evaluation of information, analytical reading, and critical writing. Three lecture hours a week for one semester. May be repeated for credit when the topics vary.


AMS 311S • Images Of Crime And Violence

31405 • Tahamtani, Bahar
Meets MWF 1:00PM-2:00PM BUR 436A
CDWr
show description

Writing, reading, and discussion on an American studies topic, with emphasis on the evaluation of information, analytical reading, and critical writing. Three lecture hours a week for one semester. May be repeated for credit when the topics vary.


AMS 315 • Germany And Globalization

31415 • Hoberman, John
Meets TTH 3:30PM-5:00PM BIO 301
(also listed as EUS 308, GSD 311F)
show description

Globalization is a historical process of worldwide integration that has both economic and cultural dimensions. As Europe's largest economy and labor market, Germany has experienced both economic and cultural globalization in ways that have transformed a society long associated with mythic ideas about German nationhood and identity. The new economic order of the European Union, characterized by multinational corporations and the free flow of capital and labor, has changed German society by internationalizing the products, services, travel opportunities, and mass media that are now available to all Germans. One aspect of this process has been the arrival of foreign workers that began during the 1950s. In recent decades the presence of 8,000,000 foreign residents, including 3,000,000 Turks, has forced the German myth of national identity to change toward a more multiethnic model. This model is now in crisis following the arrival in Germany of huge numbers of non-European refugees. The racial view of nationality based on bloodlines rather than a liberal, republican view of citizenship is, after a long postwar decline, now making a comeback on the German political right. The influence of xenophobia in Germany is currently one aspect of a “new normal.” At the same time, the postwar transformation of Germany's role in the world is evident in the fact that the prime movers of the European Union have been the politically conservative German Chancellors Helmut Kohl (1982-98) and Angela Merkel (2005-). German leadership within an unstable European Union confirms its international orientation in today’s world.

Cultural globalization during the postwar period has been driven primarily by an American "cultural imperialism" that includes the sheer power of the English language to infiltrate virtually all aspects of modern experience. Popular music, television programming, and Hollywood films exemplify the appeal of American cultural models in Germany and in other modern societies. The German language is absorbing American vocabulary ("Team," "Insider," "Know-How," "Power," etc.) at a breathtaking rate, a cultural process that has been accelerated in recent years by the ubiquity of a computer technology of American origin. All of these trends make German society an important case study in the epochal contest between cultural self-preservation and globalization that is taking place around the world.


AMS 321 • Central Eur Goes To Hollywood

31420 • Arens, Katherine
Meets TTH 11:00AM-12:30PM BIO 301
GCII (also listed as GSD 360, RTF 345)
show description

Hollywood’s golden age, from the 1930s through the 1960s, was due in no small part to the presence of emigrants or refugees: actors, directors, writers, studio heads, and technical production people.  That influence continues today.

This course will introduce you to some of their finest films, and to the problems faced by artists in exile then and now, as they try to recoup careers and reputations, and deal with media, publicity, stereotyping, and language barriers.  Case studies here will favor especially “Austria in Hollywood.”   From Klaus Maria Brandauer through Arnold Schwarzenegger, from The Sound of Music to Sunset Boulevard, Ninotchka to Eyes Wide Shut -- these are the figures, texts, and films that create, transcend, exploit, and perpetuate international images of their homelands.  Yet within the culture industries, this exemplary immigrant community offered an unparalleled source of film industry talent and critical intelligence, contributing   an urbane, witty tone to the Hollywood film, joining entertainment to sophisticated social criticism. 

These films will also be used to introduce how to “read” plays, films, and media and think critically about their content -- especially what it means to cross cultural lines, to import and export culture across political and social boundaries.  Topics to be addressed include:

        -adaptations (book to play to film to remakes)

        -conventions and stereotyping

        -film genres

        -directors, esp. Ernst Lubitsch & Billy Wilder

        -famous faces:  how celebrity works

Grading:

  • Film Worksheets ("Précis") = 3 x 5 % = 15 %
  • Group project, posted online = 20 %
  • Individual film review (growing out of group project) = 15 %
  • Research project, done in stages (Abstract, Bibliography/research strategy, final paper) = 50%

AMS 321 • Sixties Youth Culture/Media

31425 • Fuller, Kathryn
Meets MWF 2:00PM-3:00PM BUR 130 • Hybrid/Blended
CD
show description

Please check back for updates.


AMS 321 • The Silent Film

31430 • Fuller, Kathryn
Meets MWF 10:00AM-11:00AM CMA 3.116
show description

Please check back for updates.


AMS 330 • Mdrnsm In Am Design/Arch

31460 • Meikle, Jeffrey
Meets TTH 11:00AM-12:30PM BUR 108 • Hybrid/Blended
CD VP
show description

Upper-division standing required. Fulfills the core requirement for “Visual and Performing Arts”

SAME AS ARH 367 (TOPIC 3).

Description

This lecture course is intended to provide a broad knowledge of major issues in the history of American design and architecture from about 1880 to the present.  The central assumption of the course is that our environments both shape us and reflect what manner of people we are.  The term design is understood to include all elements of the built environment ranging from the smallest artifacts and products through buildings (whether vernacular or elite) to the shape of suburban and urban landscapes.  Students are encouraged to consider design in the context of social and cultural history.  Among topics to be considered are methods of cultural analysis of material artifacts; the rise, triumph, and fall of functionalism and the International Style; the emergence of uniquely American varieties of commercial design in a consumer society; the interactions of technology, economics, and design; the impact of the automobile on all levels of design; the rise of postmodern design and deconstructive architecture as counters to the modernist tradition; and design for the information age.  Among problems to be considered are tensions between tradition and novelty, between functional and expressive theories of design, between elite ideologies and popular desires, and between European and American design. 

 

Requirements

Although lectures will be illustrated with slides, this is not an image memorization course.  Grades will be based on:

Two in-class exams (the first counting 15%; the second 25%)

5-7 page paper based on original observation (30%)

Final exam (30%).

 

Possible Texts

Le Corbusier, Towards a New Architecture

Carma Gorman, The Industrial Design Reader

Jeffrey Meikle, Design in the USA

John Kasson, Amusing the Million

Karal Ann Marling, As Seen on TV

Michael Sorkin, Variations on a Theme Park


AMS 330 • Mdrnsm In Am Design/Arch-Utny

31464 • Mellins, Thomas
CD VP
show description

Upper-division standing required. Fulfills the core requirement for “Visual and Performing Arts”

SAME AS ARH 367 (TOPIC 3).

Description

This lecture course is intended to provide a broad knowledge of major issues in the history of American design and architecture from about 1880 to the present.  The central assumption of the course is that our environments both shape us and reflect what manner of people we are.  The term design is understood to include all elements of the built environment ranging from the smallest artifacts and products through buildings (whether vernacular or elite) to the shape of suburban and urban landscapes.  Students are encouraged to consider design in the context of social and cultural history.  Among topics to be considered are methods of cultural analysis of material artifacts; the rise, triumph, and fall of functionalism and the International Style; the emergence of uniquely American varieties of commercial design in a consumer society; the interactions of technology, economics, and design; the impact of the automobile on all levels of design; the rise of postmodern design and deconstructive architecture as counters to the modernist tradition; and design for the information age.  Among problems to be considered are tensions between tradition and novelty, between functional and expressive theories of design, between elite ideologies and popular desires, and between European and American design. 

 

Requirements

Although lectures will be illustrated with slides, this is not an image memorization course.  Grades will be based on:

Two in-class exams (the first counting 15%; the second 25%)

5-7 page paper based on original observation (30%)

Final exam (30%).

 

Possible Texts

Le Corbusier, Towards a New Architecture

Carma Gorman, The Industrial Design Reader

Jeffrey Meikle, Design in the USA

John Kasson, Amusing the Million

Karal Ann Marling, As Seen on TV

Michael Sorkin, Variations on a Theme Park


AMS 356 • Main Curr Amer Cul Since 1865

31470 • Mickenberg, Julia
Meets TTH 11:00AM-12:30PM BUR 134
CD HI
show description

Same as History 356K. Traces the development of American culture and society from the end of the Civil War to the present. Major themes include racial conflict, pluralism, religion, urban development and reform, modernism, government centralization, cultural radicalism, and the rebirth of conservatism. Three lecture hours a week for one semester. Prerequisite: Upper-division standing.


AMS 386 • Cultural Hist Of US Since 1865

31510 • Davis, Janet
Meets T 2:00PM-5:00PM BUR 436B
(also listed as HIS 392, WGS 393)
show description

Note: Graduate standing required. Students also required to attend undergraduate lectures, AMS 356


AMS 390 • Black Political Thought

31515 • Marshall, Stephen
Meets T 11:00AM-2:00PM BUR 436B
(also listed as AFR 386C)
show description

Graduate standing required. Permission from instructor required.


AMS 390 • Borderlands/Technology/Race

31520 • Chaar Lopez, Ivan
Meets TH 2:00PM-5:00PM BUR 436B
(also listed as HIS 392, MAS 392)
show description

Graduate standing required. Permission from instructor required.


AMS 390 • Creative Non Fiction

31525 • Lewis, Randolph
Meets M 1:00PM-4:00PM BUR 436B
show description

Graduate standing required. Permission from instructor required.


AMS 392 • Conference Course In Amer Stds

31535
show description

Graduate standing required. Permission from instructor required.


AMS 398T • Supv Teaching In American Stds

31555 • Mickenberg, Julia
Meets TH 2:00PM-5:00PM BUR 436A
show description

Graduate standing required. Permission from instructor required.