American Studies
American Studies

AMS 310 • Intro To American Studies-Wb

31495 • Chaar Lopez, Ivan
Meets TTH 12:30PM-2:00PM • Internet; Synchronous
CD HI
show description

This class introduces students to the field of American Studies. The guiding objective of the class is to use interdisciplinary lenses – such as music, dance, material culture, and urban studies – to develop a more complex understanding of American culture. In this class, we will investigate select aspects of American culture using various methodological approaches. The course outline follows a semi-linear pattern in history, but is hardly comprehensive. We will look broadly at the tensions between individual identity formation and the many social constructions that operate in American culture. The class is loosely tied around the connection, or disconnection, of individuals with mass culture (music, in particular, but also cars, corporations, television, and even fashion).


AMS 310 • Intro To American Studies-Wb

31490 • Knerr, Kerry
Meets TTH 9:00AM-10:30AM • Internet; Synchronous
CD HI
show description

This class introduces students to the field of American Studies. The guiding objective of the class is to use interdisciplinary lenses – such as music, dance, material culture, and urban studies – to develop a more complex understanding of American culture. In this class, we will investigate select aspects of American culture using various methodological approaches. The course outline follows a semi-linear pattern in history, but is hardly comprehensive. We will look broadly at the tensions between individual identity formation and the many social constructions that operate in American culture. The class is loosely tied around the connection, or disconnection, of individuals with mass culture (music, in particular, but also cars, corporations, television, and even fashion).


AMS 311S • Americans Abroad-Wb

31500 • Butterfield, Leah
Meets MWF 1:00PM-2:00PM • Internet; Synchronous
Wr
show description

Please check back for updates.


AMS 311S • Film As Cultural Document-Wb

31505 • Barber, Judson
Meets MWF 2:00PM-3:00PM • Internet; Synchronous
Wr
show description

Please check back for updates.


AMS 311S • Gendering Asian America-Wb

31510 • Remoquillo, Andrea
Meets MWF 10:00AM-11:00AM • Internet; Synchronous
CDWr (also listed as AAS 310)
show description

Please check back for updates.


AMS 311S • Prison Art/Lit/Protest-Wb

31515 • Genovese, Holly
Meets TTH 2:00PM-3:30PM • Internet; Synchronous
Wr
show description

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AMS 311S • The Mind Of Jordan Peele-Wb

31525 • Ajani, Ja'Nell
Meets MWF 12:00PM-1:00PM • Internet; Synchronous
Wr
show description

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AMS 315 • His Of Religion In The US-Wb

31540 • Graber, Jennifer • Internet; Asynchronous
HI (also listed as HIS 317L, R S 316C)
show description

This class explores how religious people and communities in the United States affirm their faith, understand the ethical life, engage in ritual acts, and organize their communal relations. Through a historically organized survey of religious groups, we will focus particularly on the themes of colonization and immigration, two phenomena that have impacted the American religious landscape.

We begin with the continent’s original diversity in its hundreds of Native American traditions. Moving to the colonial era and continuing through the contemporary moment, we will explore colonizing and migratory movements that have brought European Jews, Catholics, and Protestants, along with practitioners of Islam, Buddhism, and Hinduism from Asia and Africa to North America. We will also investigate communities birthed in the United States, including Mormonism, Pentecostalism, and the Nation of Islam. Through this survey, we will consider a variety of religious traditions, the changing state of the population’s religious composition, as well as how Americans have navigated those shifts using concepts such as disestablishment, diversity, and pluralism.

This course fulfills the core curriculum requirement for U.S. history. It also carries the flag for Cultural Diversity in the United States. Cultural Diversity courses are designed to increase your familiarity with the variety and richness of the American cultural experience. You should therefore expect a substantial portion of your grade to come from assignments covering the practices, beliefs, and histories of at least one U.S. cultural group that has experienced persistent marginalization.


AMS 315 • Intro To Asian Am Studies-Wb

31535 • Bhalodia, Aarti
Meets MWF 11:00AM-12:00PM • Internet; Synchronous
CD (also listed as AAS 301)
show description

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AMS 315 • Race, Deportation, Diaspora-Wb

31530 • Mena, Olivia
Meets MWF 12:00PM-1:00PM • Internet; Synchronous
CDGC (also listed as AAS 310, AFR 310, LAS 310)
show description

Please check back for updates.


AMS 321 • 50 Yrs Mex Am Studies At Ut-Wb

31550 • Vasquez, Antonio
Meets TTH 2:00PM-3:30PM • Internet; Synchronous
CDII HI (also listed as MAS 374)
show description

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AMS 321 • Asian Amer Jurisprudence-Wb

31544 • Jin, Arnold
Meets TTH 12:30PM-2:00PM • Internet; Synchronous
CD (also listed as AAS 335, GOV 355M)
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AMS 321 • Cultural Landscapes-Wb

31545 • Lopez, Sarah
Meets TTH 9:30AM-11:00AM • Internet; Synchronous
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AMS 321 • Natv Amer Culs North Of Mex

31555 • Sturm, Circe
Meets TTH 12:30PM-2:00PM • Internet; Synchronous
CD (also listed as ANT 336L)
show description

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AMS 327I • Religion/Social Justice US-Wb

31575 • Seales, Chad • Internet; Asynchronous
E (also listed as R S 346R)
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This course examines the material relationships between religion and social justice in the United States.  It compares the ways modern religion carries within itself the material possibility of liberated consciousness, radical democracy, and social equality, even as it often postpones these promises to the next life, or the next millennium, and ultimately reinforces the status quo. This course then will take as its topic the grand questions of religious practice and social change: Why is the world the way it is?  And how has religion helped make it so?  How can we change the world for the better?  And does religion help us, or hinder us, in that pursuit?  To answer those questions we will pay particular attention to disruptive religious practices.  That is, religions as practiced by those often deemed on the edge of society, outside the mainstream, or in the minority.  These will include religious practices constitutive of social movements addressing Human and Civil Rights, including those historically related to the Abolition of Slavery, Anti-Lynching Campaigns, Prisoner Rights, Immigrant Rights, Gay Rights, Sustainable Food Systems, and Racial and Economic Justice.


AMS 330 • Mdrnsm In Am Design/Arch-Ny

31579 • Mellins, Thomas • Hybrid/Blended
CD VP
show description

Upper-division standing required. Fulfills the core requirement for “Visual and Performing Arts”

SAME AS ARH 367 (TOPIC 3).

Description

This lecture course is intended to provide a broad knowledge of major issues in the history of American design and architecture from about 1880 to the present.  The central assumption of the course is that our environments both shape us and reflect what manner of people we are.  The term design is understood to include all elements of the built environment ranging from the smallest artifacts and products through buildings (whether vernacular or elite) to the shape of suburban and urban landscapes.  Students are encouraged to consider design in the context of social and cultural history.  Among topics to be considered are methods of cultural analysis of material artifacts; the rise, triumph, and fall of functionalism and the International Style; the emergence of uniquely American varieties of commercial design in a consumer society; the interactions of technology, economics, and design; the impact of the automobile on all levels of design; the rise of postmodern design and deconstructive architecture as counters to the modernist tradition; and design for the information age.  Among problems to be considered are tensions between tradition and novelty, between functional and expressive theories of design, between elite ideologies and popular desires, and between European and American design. 

 

Requirements

Although lectures will be illustrated with slides, this is not an image memorization course.  Grades will be based on:

Two in-class exams (the first counting 15%; the second 25%)

5-7 page paper based on original observation (30%)

Final exam (30%).

 

Possible Texts

Le Corbusier, Towards a New Architecture

Carma Gorman, The Industrial Design Reader

Jeffrey Meikle, Design in the USA

John Kasson, Amusing the Million

Karal Ann Marling, As Seen on TV

Michael Sorkin, Variations on a Theme Park


AMS 330 • Mdrnsm In Am Design/Arch-Wb

31580 • Meikle, Jeffrey
Meets TTH 12:30PM-2:00PM • Internet; Synchronous
VP
show description

Upper-division standing required. Fulfills the core requirement for “Visual and Performing Arts”

SAME AS ARH 367 (TOPIC 3).

Description

This lecture course is intended to provide a broad knowledge of major issues in the history of American design and architecture from about 1880 to the present.  The central assumption of the course is that our environments both shape us and reflect what manner of people we are.  The term design is understood to include all elements of the built environment ranging from the smallest artifacts and products through buildings (whether vernacular or elite) to the shape of suburban and urban landscapes.  Students are encouraged to consider design in the context of social and cultural history.  Among topics to be considered are methods of cultural analysis of material artifacts; the rise, triumph, and fall of functionalism and the International Style; the emergence of uniquely American varieties of commercial design in a consumer society; the interactions of technology, economics, and design; the impact of the automobile on all levels of design; the rise of postmodern design and deconstructive architecture as counters to the modernist tradition; and design for the information age.  Among problems to be considered are tensions between tradition and novelty, between functional and expressive theories of design, between elite ideologies and popular desires, and between European and American design. 

 

Requirements

Although lectures will be illustrated with slides, this is not an image memorization course.  Grades will be based on:

Two in-class exams (the first counting 15%; the second 25%)

5-7 page paper based on original observation (30%)

Final exam (30%).

 

Possible Texts

Le Corbusier, Towards a New Architecture

Carma Gorman, The Industrial Design Reader

Jeffrey Meikle, Design in the USA

John Kasson, Amusing the Million

Karal Ann Marling, As Seen on TV

Michael Sorkin, Variations on a Theme Park


AMS 355 • Main Cur Of Amr Cul To 1865-Wb

31585 • Beasley, Alex
Meets TTH 12:30PM-2:00PM • Internet; Synchronous
CD HI (also listed as HIS 355N)
show description

Same as History 355N. Traces the development of American culture and society from the colonial era until the end of the Civil War. Major themes include racial conflict, religion, slavery, the development of democracy, and cultural reform. Three lecture hours a week for one semester. Prerequisite: Upper-division standing.


AMS 356 • Main Cur Amer Cul Sinc 1865-Wb

31590 • Mickenberg, Julia
Meets TTH 11:00AM-12:30PM • Internet; Synchronous
CD HI
show description

Same as History 356K. Traces the development of American culture and society from the end of the Civil War to the present. Major themes include racial conflict, pluralism, religion, urban development and reform, modernism, government centralization, cultural radicalism, and the rebirth of conservatism. Three lecture hours a week for one semester. Prerequisite: Upper-division standing.


AMS 370 • Diners Drive-Ins And Dives-Wb

31595 • Knerr, Kerry
Meets TTH 11:00AM-12:30PM • Internet; Synchronous
IIWr
show description

This course is an upper-level seminar exploring the evolution of dining culture in the United States. With restaurant culture rapidly changing in our current moment, this course looks at the long and fraught history of dining in American culture. Restaurants, taverns, and bars may seem equally open and welcoming to all, but historically, these places have been an important site for the negotiation and production of race, gender, and class categories. Topics will include taverns and political culture in the early republic, the social history of cookbooks as women’s literature, the institutionalization of domestic and nutrition sciences, and segregated Southern restaurants, among many others. In each of these topics, we can see how not all were welcomed at America’s tables.


AMS 370 • Hist Black Entrepren In US

31630 • Walker, Juliet
Meets TTH 2:00PM-3:30PM RLP 1.104
CDIIWr HI (also listed as AFR 351E, HIS 350R)
show description

Same as African and African Diaspora Studies 351E and History 350R (Topic 12). Three lecture hours a week for one semester. Only one of the following may be counted: African and African Diaspora Studies 351E, 374D (Topic 2), American Studies 370 (Topic: Hist of Black Entrepren in US), 370 (Topic 58), History 350R (Topic 12). Additional prerequisite: Upper-division standing and six semester hours of coursework in history.


AMS 370 • Latinidades: Art/Perfrmance-Wb

31600 • Cordova, Cary
Meets TTH 2:00PM-3:30PM • Internet; Synchronous
IIWr
show description

How have Latinas/Latinos/Latinxs turned to art as a form of creative expression? And how have they used art to demand social change? This class will contextualize and analyze diverse forms of Latina/o/x artistic expression, including visual art, music, dance, theatre, and film, or what this class will call, “Latinidades.” Moving from the mid-twentieth century into the twenty-first century, students will study these diverse constructions of Latinidad alongside the politics of community organizing amongst various communities, and in conversation with the histories of Chicana/o/x, Puerto Rican, Dominican, and Salvadoran populations. Topics will include representations of citizenship and immigration; borders and surveillance; community formation, displacement, and segregation; access to and content of education; and the construction and criteria of art history. Students also will engage with how citizenship, nation, race, gender, sexuality, class, and ability have complicated these artistic representations.

As students develop an understanding of the range and diversity of artistic expressions (graphics, cartoons, paintings, murals, photographs, films, installations, performance art, dances, songs, poems, plays, and comedy), they also will develop an understanding of the complexity of Latino communities, and the coalitions and conflicts bridging and dividing larger social movements. Artists may include Laura Aguilar, Lalo Alcaraz, Miguel Algarín, Culture Clash, Harry Gamboa, Lalo Guerrero, John Jota Leaños, Yolanda Lopez, Lin-Manuel Miranda, Jim Mendiola, Mundo Meza, Joiri Minaya, Alejandro Murguia, Alex Rivera, Julio Salgado, and Juan Sanchez.


AMS 370 • Panics In Amer Capitalism-Wb

31605 • Knerr, Kerry
Meets MW 10:00AM-11:30AM • Internet; Synchronous
IIWr
show description

The history of the United States and the history of capitalism are deeply woven together. This course investigates the range of ways that capitalism has influenced the development of the nation, as seen through the periodic economic panics, to unpack the cultural ideas that have shaped the daily life of capital. The course will consist of four units, each focused on a moment of crisis in American capital. The first will focus on the 1830s. The so-called market revolution, western expansion, the domestic slave trade, and the Panic of 1835 will form the basis of our inquiry into the early histories of capitalism in the U.S. The second will focus on the Great Depression and the crisis of the 1930s, which many at the time and since have understood to be a singular failure of American capital. The third section will look in depth at the 1970s—the shift to post-industrialism, the breaking of the unions, the invention of economic statistics like GDP, and the growth of neoliberalism and globalization. The fourth unit will unpack the 2008 financial crisis and its disparate impacts and effects throughout U.S. society. In focusing on panics, or market failures, we can see where the system breaks, who is protected in crisis, and where are the repeated sites of value extraction.


AMS 370 • Preserving Atx Queer Hist-Wb

31609 • Gutterman, Lauren
Meets TTH 2:00PM-3:30PM • Internet; Synchronous
Wr
show description

This course will engage undergraduate students in building the foundation for an ongoing Austin LGBTQ Oral History Project to be housed at the Briscoe Center for American History. “Preserving Austin’s Queer History,” will introduce students to Austin's queer history since World War II and to writing on the practice of oral history and LGBTQ oral history in particular. Students will be required to apply what they have learned by taking on the responsibilities of an oral history practitioner and project founder. Together we will develop a mission statement, identify potential interviewees, and develops a critical set of oral history questions. Students will then conduct an original oral history interview either individually or in pairs. Finally, the class will create a sustainability plan that identifies potential funding sources and addresses data storage and accessibility issues. We will also invite members of the public to participate in an online presentation of our research at the conclusion of the course.


AMS 370 • Race, Medicine & Disability-Wb

31608 • Mobley, Izetta
Meets TTH 3:30PM-5:00PM • Internet; Synchronous
IIWr
show description

xamines the entanglements among race, medicine, and disability. In the continuous wake of COVID-19, when science, medicine, and race have so pivotally overlapped, a course that explores the intersection and cultural discourses surrounding race and medicine seems critical. Topics include the historic collisions of race and medicine such as the 1793 yellow fever outbreak in Philadelphia and the long-ranging Tuskegee experiments.


AMS 370 • Race, Power, & Metropolis-Wb

31607 • Mobley, Izetta
Meets TTH 11:00AM-12:30PM • Internet; Synchronous
IIWr
show description

Using Henri Lefebvre’s concept of “the right to the city” this cultural landscapes course explores how race and identity impact access to the place and space in city landscapes. At a moment in which access to place is ever-more contested, how do we come to understand who has access to the city? Who gets to define the city? How do race, class, disability, and gender impact one’s sense of place in the city? In addition to an original research paper, students will design their ideal city, explaining what policies, use of space, and built environment they would employ and why.


AMS 370 • The Culture Of Cities

31615 • Heyman, Richard
Meets TTH 11:00AM-12:30PM CMA 3.114 • Hybrid/Blended
CDIIWr
show description

Same as Geography 356T (Topic 1) and Urban Studies 320T. Examines the social, geographical, and cultural evolution of the United States from a rural and small-town society to an urban and suburban nation. Subjects may include the segregation of public and private space; the formation of urban subcultures organized by gender, work, race, religion, and sexuality; social and spatial divisions between rich and poor and native-born and immigrant; and the increasing importance of cultural capital in reshaping urban politics and in conflicts over revitalization and gentrification. Three lecture hours a week for one semester. Only one of the following may be counted: American Studies 370 (Topic 13), Geography 356T (Topic 1), Urban Studies 320T, 354 (Topic 4). Additional prerequisite: Upper-division standing.


AMS 370 • Vienna: Memory/The City-Aut

31620 • Hoelscher, Steven
GCIIWr
show description

Same as European Studies 346 (Topic 5), History 362C, and Urban Studies 322C. Examines the ways in which cultural memory has shaped, and continues to shape, urban life in Vienna, Austria. Three lecture hours a week for one semester. Only one of the following may be counted: American Studies 370 (Topic 41), European Studies 346 (Topic 5), Geography 356T (Topic: Vienna: Memory and the City), Germanic, Scandinavian, and Dutch Studies 360 (Topic: Vienna: Memory and the City), History 362C, 362G (Topic 2), Urban Studies 322C, 354 (Topic 7). Additional prerequisite: Upper-division standing.


AMS 386 • Cultrl His Of US Since 1865-Wb

31645 • Mickenberg, Julia
Meets TH 2:00PM-5:00PM • Internet; Synchronous
(also listed as HIS 392, WGS 393)
show description

Note: Graduate standing required. Students also required to attend undergraduate lectures, AMS 356


AMS 386 • Cultural Hist Of US Since 1865

31649 • Mickenberg, Julia
Meets TH 2:00PM-5:00PM BUR 436B • Hybrid/Blended
show description

Note: Graduate standing required. Students also required to attend undergraduate lectures, AMS 356


AMS 390 • Black Political Thought-Wb

31650 • Marshall, Stephen
Meets T 2:00PM-5:00PM • Internet; Synchronous
(also listed as AFR 381)
show description

Graduate standing required. Permission from instructor required.


AMS 390 • Borderlnds/Technology/Race-Wb

31655 • Chaar Lopez, Ivan
Meets W 1:00PM-4:00PM • Internet; Synchronous
show description

This course examines what becomes legible when we explore the borderlands though the articulations of technology and race after 1945. Often times, historical actors have treated the borderlands as a site for the development of an experimental mode of governance that, with time, becomes dominant. Part of the course’s method is to explore borderlands through a comparative approach that tries to understand the proliferation of (racial) capitalist modes of production. Throughout the semester we will explore the role of the borderlands in, among other things, the development of nuclearity, special economic zones, electronics manufacturing, energy, urban spaces, waste, border enforcement, logistics, and the entrepreneurial self.


AMS 390 • Islamic Feminism-Wb

31659 • Azam, Hina
Meets T 3:00PM-6:00PM PAR 206 • Hybrid/Blended
(also listed as MES 386, R S 390T, WGS 393)
show description

Description

Islam and feminism are often considered to be contradictory in their essences and objectives. Nevertheless, we now find more than a century of writing by Muslim women (and men) who draw their inspiration from their religion, and who seek to reconcile Islam’s scriptures and traditions with principles of gender equality and justice.  This course explores the idea of Islamic feminism, and surveys its history and key writings.  Students will be introduced to some of the practices, doctrines, and texts of Islam that have been considered most problematic from a women/gender perspective, and will read and discuss the ideas of several critical figures from the 20th and 21st centuries. Throughout the course, students will be encouraged to reflect on the idea of, and varying definitions of, “Islamic feminism,” as well as to develop their own definitions of the term. All required readings will be in English. 

In addition to carrying the expected MES, RS and WGS crosslistings, this course also carries an American Studies (AMS) crosslisting, for two reasons: First, much critical work in Islamic feminism is being carried out by U.S.-based scholars, writers,  and activists, and study of that work receives significant attention in this course.  Second, this course seeks to interrogate the dichotomy not only between “Islam” and “feminism,” but also between “Islam” and “the West.” Studying the discourses of Muslim American feminists leads us to imagine different ways of being Muslim, feminist, and American.

 

Course Requirements/Grading

Attendance                                                    20%

Class Participation                                      20%

5 Reading Responses – 8% each               40%

Term Paper in 4 parts                                  35%

-- Part A) Proposal                                 5%

-- Part B) Annotated Bibliography         10%

-- Part C) Outline wIntro & Thesis         5%

-- Part D) Paper                                  15%

 

Course Readings:

Textbooks (tentative list):

  • Margot Badran. Feminism in Islam: Secular and Religious Convergences. 2009.
  • Barbara Stowasser. Women in the Qur’an, Traditions, and Interpretation. 1994.
  • Lamia Shehadeh, The Idea of Women Under Fundamentalist Islam. 2007.
  • Qasim Amin. The Liberation of Woman, and The New Woman. 1900.
  • Fatima Mernissi. The Veil and the Male Elite (Le harem politique – Le Prophète et les femmes). Tr. Mary Jo Lakeland.1987.
  • Amina Wadud. Qur’an and Woman. 1992.
  • Gisela Webb, ed. Windows of Faith. 2000.
  • Aysha Hidayatullah. Feminist Edges of the Qur’an. 2014.
  • Kecia Ali. Sexual Ethics and Islam. 2006.
  • Zaynab Ghazali, Days from my life (Ayyām min ḥayātī). Tr. A. R. Kidwai. 1978.
  • Bint al-Shāṭi’ (‘A’isha bt. ‘Abd al-Raḥmān), Wives of the Prophet (Nisā’ al-Nabī). Tr. Matti Moosa. 1973.

Additional readings (articles, essays, and book chapters) will be available in PDF format on Canvas. 

Arabic primary text reading supplementation: If enough students are interested, an optional session to read primary texts in Arabic can be arranged.

 


AMS 390 • Keywords: Racial Capitalism-Wb

31658-31660 • Chhun, Lina
Meets M 1:00PM-4:00PM • Internet; Synchronous
(also listed as AAS 381, WGS 393)
show description

Graduate standing required. Permission from instructor required.


AMS 391 • Visualizing Slavery-Wb

31670 • Chambers, Edward
Meets W 9:00AM-12:00PM • Internet; Synchronous
show description

Graduate standing required. Permission from instructor required.


AMS 398T • Supv Teachng In Amercn Stds-Wb

31694 • Lewis, Randolph • Internet; Asynchronous
show description

Graduate standing required. Permission from instructor required.