American Studies
American Studies

AMS 311S • Americans Abroad-Wb

31500 • Butterfield, Leah
Meets MWF 1:00PM-2:00PM • Internet
Wr
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AMS 311S • Film As Cultural Document-Wb

31505 • Barber, Judson
Meets MWF 2:00PM-3:00PM • Internet
Wr
show description

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AMS 311S • Gendering Asian America

31510 • Remoquillo, Andrea
Meets MWF 10:00AM-11:00AM CBA 4.324 • Hybrid/Blended
CDWr (also listed as AAS 310)
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AMS 311S • Prison Art/Lit/Protest-Wb

31515 • Genovese, Holly
Meets TTH 2:00PM-3:30PM • Internet
Wr
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AMS 311S • The Mind Of Jordan Peele-Wb

31525 • Ajani, Ja'Nell
Meets MWF 12:00PM-1:00PM • Internet
Wr
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AMS 315 • Hist Of Religion In The US-Wb

31540 • Graber, Jennifer
HI (also listed as HIS 317L, R S 316C)
show description

This class explores how religious people and communities in the United States affirm their faith, understand the ethical life, engage in ritual acts, and organize their communal relations. Through a historically organized survey of religious groups, we will focus particularly on the themes of colonization and immigration, two phenomena that have impacted the American religious landscape.

We begin with the continent’s original diversity in its hundreds of Native American traditions. Moving to the colonial era and continuing through the contemporary moment, we will explore colonizing and migratory movements that have brought European Jews, Catholics, and Protestants, along with practitioners of Islam, Buddhism, and Hinduism from Asia and Africa to North America. We will also investigate communities birthed in the United States, including Mormonism, Pentecostalism, and the Nation of Islam. Through this survey, we will consider a variety of religious traditions, the changing state of the population’s religious composition, as well as how Americans have navigated those shifts using concepts such as disestablishment, diversity, and pluralism.

This course fulfills the core curriculum requirement for U.S. history. It also carries the flag for Cultural Diversity in the United States. Cultural Diversity courses are designed to increase your familiarity with the variety and richness of the American cultural experience. You should therefore expect a substantial portion of your grade to come from assignments covering the practices, beliefs, and histories of at least one U.S. cultural group that has experienced persistent marginalization.


AMS 315 • Intro To Asian Am Studies-Wb

31535 • Bhalodia, Aarti
Meets MWF 11:00AM-12:00PM • Internet
CD (also listed as AAS 301)
show description

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AMS 315 • Race, Deportation, Diaspora-Wb

31530 • Mena, Olivia
Meets MWF 12:00PM-1:00PM • Internet
CDGC (also listed as AAS 310, AFR 310, LAS 310)
show description

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AMS 321 • 50 Yrs Mex Am Studies At Ut-Wb

31550 • Vasquez, Antonio
Meets TTH 2:00PM-3:30PM • Internet
CDII HI (also listed as MAS 374)
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AMS 321 • Cultural Landscapes-Wb

31545 • Lopez, Sarah
Meets TTH 9:30AM-11:00AM • Internet
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AMS 321 • Natv Amer Culs North Of Mex-Wb

31555 • Sturm, Circe
Meets TTH 12:30PM-2:00PM • Internet
CD (also listed as ANT 336L)
show description

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AMS 321F • African Amer Hist Since 1860

31560 • Walker, Juliet
Meets TTH 11:00AM-12:30PM JGB 2.216
CD HI (also listed as AFR 357D, HIS 357D, URB 327D)
show description

Assessments of the historic experience of African Americans from the Civil War and Reconstruction to the Civil Rights Era and the Second Reconstruction, i.e., the post-Civil Rights Era from the 1970s through 2020, provide the focus of this course.  Emphasis will be placed on the political, economic, including the business activities, as well as social and cultural activities of African Americans. The course begins with assessing the Black American experience during the Civil War and Reconstruction.  In the immediate first post-Reconstruction, the Exodus of 1879 is considered along with the founding and building of Black Towns. Also, legal and extralegal means, including violence, disfranchisement and segregation of Blacks, that is, the rise of Jim Crow, at the turn of the century and the Great Migration of the WWI era are examined. Ideologies of black leaders during that period, W.E.B. Du Bois, Booker T. Washington, Ida B. Wells and Marcus Garvey are compared.

The rise of the black urban ghetto and impact of African American working class as it relates to African American culture provide the focus for examining the twentieth century Black Experience. The Harlem Renaissance and the conditions of blacks in the Great Depression and WWII to the 1954 Brown decision provide an introduction to the Black Freedom Movement of the 1960s. Assessments are made of the riots in the 1960s, ideologies of Black leaders and black organizations, CORE, SNCC, and Black Panthers. Agendas of post-Civil rights era black social, political and business leaders are examined, such as Houston’s Case Lawal, hip hop entrepreneurs and the first two black billionaires, Robert Johnson (BET) and Oprah Winfrey..

Significantly, the course begins with a Civil War, marking an end of slavery and the beginning of black political participation. It ends with the historical phenomenon of the election of Barack Obama, the first African American President of the United States. What does this say about race/racism in America? What about Katrina and Black Reconstruction in New Orleans in 2009 as well as “the $40 Million Dollar slave” 149 years after the 13th Amendment? The course ends with commentaries on retrenchment in affirmative action, commodification of African American culture, and assessments of America’s changing racial demographics on African Americans in the 21st century.


Texts:
Franklin, John H. and Evelyn Higginbotham,  From Slavery to Freedom,9th ed, paper
Henry, Charles P, Allen, R , and Chrisma, R. The Obama Phenomenon: Toward a Multiracial Democracy
Holt Thomas and Barkley-Brown, E., Major Problems, African American History vol 2  
Rhoden, William C., Forty Million Dollar Slaves: The Rise, Fall,  Redemption of the Black Athlete
Smith-Shomade, Beretta,   Pimpin’ Ain’t Easy: Selling Black Entertainment Television
Walker, Juliet E. K. The History of Black Business in America -course packet


Grading:
Exam 1  (Take home)                    30
History Research Paper                 30
Student Panel Presentation           10
Exam  2(Take Home)                  30


AMS 327I • Religion/Social Justice US-Wb

31575 • Seales, Chad
E (also listed as R S 346R)
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This course examines the material relationships between religion and social justice in the United States.  It compares the ways modern religion carries within itself the material possibility of liberated consciousness, radical democracy, and social equality, even as it often postpones these promises to the next life, or the next millennium, and ultimately reinforces the status quo. This course then will take as its topic the grand questions of religious practice and social change: Why is the world the way it is?  And how has religion helped make it so?  How can we change the world for the better?  And does religion help us, or hinder us, in that pursuit?  To answer those questions we will pay particular attention to disruptive religious practices.  That is, religions as practiced by those often deemed on the edge of society, outside the mainstream, or in the minority.  These will include religious practices constitutive of social movements addressing Human and Civil Rights, including those historically related to the Abolition of Slavery, Anti-Lynching Campaigns, Prisoner Rights, Immigrant Rights, Gay Rights, Sustainable Food Systems, and Racial and Economic Justice.


AMS 330 • Mdrnsm In Am Design/Arch-Ny

31579 • Mellins, Thomas
CD VP
show description

Upper-division standing required. Fulfills the core requirement for “Visual and Performing Arts”

SAME AS ARH 367 (TOPIC 3).

Description

This lecture course is intended to provide a broad knowledge of major issues in the history of American design and architecture from about 1880 to the present.  The central assumption of the course is that our environments both shape us and reflect what manner of people we are.  The term design is understood to include all elements of the built environment ranging from the smallest artifacts and products through buildings (whether vernacular or elite) to the shape of suburban and urban landscapes.  Students are encouraged to consider design in the context of social and cultural history.  Among topics to be considered are methods of cultural analysis of material artifacts; the rise, triumph, and fall of functionalism and the International Style; the emergence of uniquely American varieties of commercial design in a consumer society; the interactions of technology, economics, and design; the impact of the automobile on all levels of design; the rise of postmodern design and deconstructive architecture as counters to the modernist tradition; and design for the information age.  Among problems to be considered are tensions between tradition and novelty, between functional and expressive theories of design, between elite ideologies and popular desires, and between European and American design. 

 

Requirements

Although lectures will be illustrated with slides, this is not an image memorization course.  Grades will be based on:

Two in-class exams (the first counting 15%; the second 25%)

5-7 page paper based on original observation (30%)

Final exam (30%).

 

Possible Texts

Le Corbusier, Towards a New Architecture

Carma Gorman, The Industrial Design Reader

Jeffrey Meikle, Design in the USA

John Kasson, Amusing the Million

Karal Ann Marling, As Seen on TV

Michael Sorkin, Variations on a Theme Park


AMS 330 • Mdrnsm In Am Design/Arch-Wb

31580 • Meikle, Jeffrey
Meets TTH 12:30PM-2:00PM • Internet
VP
show description

Upper-division standing required. Fulfills the core requirement for “Visual and Performing Arts”

SAME AS ARH 367 (TOPIC 3).

Description

This lecture course is intended to provide a broad knowledge of major issues in the history of American design and architecture from about 1880 to the present.  The central assumption of the course is that our environments both shape us and reflect what manner of people we are.  The term design is understood to include all elements of the built environment ranging from the smallest artifacts and products through buildings (whether vernacular or elite) to the shape of suburban and urban landscapes.  Students are encouraged to consider design in the context of social and cultural history.  Among topics to be considered are methods of cultural analysis of material artifacts; the rise, triumph, and fall of functionalism and the International Style; the emergence of uniquely American varieties of commercial design in a consumer society; the interactions of technology, economics, and design; the impact of the automobile on all levels of design; the rise of postmodern design and deconstructive architecture as counters to the modernist tradition; and design for the information age.  Among problems to be considered are tensions between tradition and novelty, between functional and expressive theories of design, between elite ideologies and popular desires, and between European and American design. 

 

Requirements

Although lectures will be illustrated with slides, this is not an image memorization course.  Grades will be based on:

Two in-class exams (the first counting 15%; the second 25%)

5-7 page paper based on original observation (30%)

Final exam (30%).

 

Possible Texts

Le Corbusier, Towards a New Architecture

Carma Gorman, The Industrial Design Reader

Jeffrey Meikle, Design in the USA

John Kasson, Amusing the Million

Karal Ann Marling, As Seen on TV

Michael Sorkin, Variations on a Theme Park


AMS 370 • Diners Drive-Ins And Dives-Wb

31595 • Knerr, Kerry
Meets TTH 11:00AM-12:30PM • Internet
IIWr
show description

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AMS 370 • Hist Black Entrepren In US

31630 • Walker, Juliet
Meets TTH 2:00PM-3:30PM RLP 1.104
CDIIWr HI (also listed as AFR 351E, HIS 350R)
show description

Within the construct of African American Business history, race, contemporary American popular culture and global capitalism, this course will focus on an important aspect in the contemporary political economy of black Americans. Specifically, the commodification (sale) of black culture provides the conceptual frame for an examination of the phenomenon of both the superstar black athlete as an entrepreneur and the Hip Hop Superstar as an entrepreneur in post-Civil Rights America. The emphasis in this course, then, is to critically examine and analyze the impact of a multiplicity of societal, cultural and economic factors in the post-modern information age, propelled by new technologies in the New Economy of Global Capitalism.  Also, consideration will be given to the new diversity as it impacts on the political economy of African Americans.

Proceeding from an interdisciplinary perspective, the course considers both the financial successes of superstar black athletes and hip hop entrepreneurs as well as their emergence as cultural icons, contrasted with the comparatively overall poor performance of Black Business not only within the intersection of race, gender, class, but also within the context of transnationalism in the globalization sale of African American Culture in post-Civil Rights America. But who profits?

Most important, why is it that business receipts for African Americans, who comprise almost thirteen percent of this nation's population, amounted in 2007 to only .5%, that is, less than one (1) percent of the nation's total business receipts? In addition, why is it that among the various occupational categories in which blacks participate in the nation's economy, especially as businesspeople, that black entertainers and sports figures are the highest paid? What does this say about race, class, gender and hegemonic masculinities in America at the turn of the new century?

Anderson, Maggie, Our Black Year: One Family's Quest to Buy Black in America's Racially Divided Economy
 
Jones, Marvin D. Fear of a Hip Hop Planet: America’s New  Dilemma
 
Marable, Manning, How Capitalism Underdeveloped Black America: Problems Race, Political Economy, and  Society  
 
Rhoden, William C. Forty Million Dollar Slaves: The Rise, Fall, and Redemption of the Black Athlete
 
Smith-Shomade, Beretta,   Pimpin’ Ain’t Easy: Selling Black Entertainment Television
 
Stoute, Steve, The Tanning of America:  How Hip Hop Created a Culture That Rewrote the Rules of a  New Economy

Walker, Juliet E. K. “History of Black Business in America: Capitalism, Race, Entrepreneurship”           
      Course Packet chapters 6-11 from The History of Black Business in America:  Capitalism, Race,
                      Entrepreneurship (New York/London:  Macmillan/Prentice Hall International, 1998)  


Critical Book Review Analysis                           25%
    (5 reviews, 2-3 pages 5 points each)
Class Discussion/participation                             25%
Oral Summary of Research Paper                         5%
Seminar Research Paper (15 pages)                    45%


AMS 370 • Latinidades: Art & Performance

31600 • Cordova, Cary
Meets TTH 2:00PM-3:30PM BUR 220 • Hybrid/Blended
IIWr
show description

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AMS 370 • Panics In Amer Capitalism-Wb

31605 • Knerr, Kerry
Meets MW 10:00AM-11:30AM • Internet
IIWr
show description

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AMS 370 • Politics Of Black Life-Wb

31625 • Marshall, Stephen
Meets TTH 11:00AM-12:30PM • Internet
IIWr
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AMS 370 • The Culture Of Cities

31615 • Heyman, Richard
Meets TTH 11:00AM-12:30PM CMA 3.114 • Hybrid/Blended
CDIIWr
show description

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AMS 370 • Vienna: Memory And The City

31620 • Hoelscher, Steven
GCIIWr (also listed as EUS 346)
show description

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AMS 386 • Cultrl His Of US Since 1865-Wb

31645 • Mickenberg, Julia
Meets TH 2:00PM-5:00PM • Internet
(also listed as HIS 392, WGS 393)
show description

Note: Graduate standing required. Students also required to attend undergraduate lectures, AMS 356


AMS 390 • Black Political Thought-Wb

31650 • Marshall, Stephen
Meets T 2:00PM-5:00PM • Internet
show description

Graduate standing required. Permission from instructor required.


AMS 390 • Borderlnds/Technology/Race-Wb

31655 • Chaar Lopez, Ivan
Meets W 1:00PM-4:00PM • Internet
show description

Graduate standing required. Permission from instructor required.


AMS 390 • Islamic Feminism-Wb

31659 • Azam, Hina
Meets T 3:00PM-6:00PM • Internet
(also listed as MES 386, R S 390T, WGS 393)
show description

Description

Islam and feminism are often considered to be contradictory in their essences and objectives. Nevertheless, we now find more than a century of writing by Muslim women (and men) who draw their inspiration from their religion, and who seek to reconcile Islam’s scriptures and traditions with principles of gender equality and justice.  This course explores the idea of Islamic feminism, and surveys its history and key writings.  Students will be introduced to some of the practices, doctrines, and texts of Islam that have been considered most problematic from a women/gender perspective, and will read and discuss the ideas of several critical figures from the 20th and 21st centuries. Throughout the course, students will be encouraged to reflect on the idea of, and varying definitions of, “Islamic feminism,” as well as to develop their own definitions of the term. All required readings will be in English. 

In addition to carrying the expected MES, RS and WGS crosslistings, this course also carries an American Studies (AMS) crosslisting, for two reasons: First, much critical work in Islamic feminism is being carried out by U.S.-based scholars, writers,  and activists, and study of that work receives significant attention in this course.  Second, this course seeks to interrogate the dichotomy not only between “Islam” and “feminism,” but also between “Islam” and “the West.” Studying the discourses of Muslim American feminists leads us to imagine different ways of being Muslim, feminist, and American.

 

Course Requirements/Grading

Attendance                                                    20%

Class Participation                                      20%

5 Reading Responses – 8% each               40%

Term Paper in 4 parts                                  35%

-- Part A) Proposal                                 5%

-- Part B) Annotated Bibliography         10%

-- Part C) Outline wIntro & Thesis         5%

-- Part D) Paper                                  15%

 

Course Readings:

Textbooks (tentative list):

  • Margot Badran. Feminism in Islam: Secular and Religious Convergences. 2009.
  • Barbara Stowasser. Women in the Qur’an, Traditions, and Interpretation. 1994.
  • Lamia Shehadeh, The Idea of Women Under Fundamentalist Islam. 2007.
  • Qasim Amin. The Liberation of Woman, and The New Woman. 1900.
  • Fatima Mernissi. The Veil and the Male Elite (Le harem politique – Le Prophète et les femmes). Tr. Mary Jo Lakeland.1987.
  • Amina Wadud. Qur’an and Woman. 1992.
  • Gisela Webb, ed. Windows of Faith. 2000.
  • Aysha Hidayatullah. Feminist Edges of the Qur’an. 2014.
  • Kecia Ali. Sexual Ethics and Islam. 2006.
  • Zaynab Ghazali, Days from my life (Ayyām min ḥayātī). Tr. A. R. Kidwai. 1978.
  • Bint al-Shāṭi’ (‘A’isha bt. ‘Abd al-Raḥmān), Wives of the Prophet (Nisā’ al-Nabī). Tr. Matti Moosa. 1973.

Additional readings (articles, essays, and book chapters) will be available in PDF format on Canvas. 

Arabic primary text reading supplementation: If enough students are interested, an optional session to read primary texts in Arabic can be arranged.

 


AMS 390 • Keywords: Racial Capitalism

31660 • Chhun, Lina
Meets M 1:00PM-4:00PM CBA 4.324 • Hybrid/Blended
show description

Graduate standing required. Permission from instructor required.


AMS 391 • Visualizing Slavery-Wb

31670 • Chambers, Edward
Meets W 9:00AM-12:00PM • Internet
show description

Graduate standing required. Permission from instructor required.


AMS 392 • Conference Course In Amer Stds

31675
show description

Graduate standing required. Permission from instructor required.