American Studies
American Studies

AMS 311S • Film As Cultural Document-Wb

30505 • Barber, Judson
Meets MWF 10:00AM-11:00AM • Internet
Wr
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AMS 311S • Identity In Asian America-Wb

30520 • Remoquillo, Andrea
Meets MWF 11:00AM-12:00PM • Internet
Wr
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AMS 311S • Immigrant Identities-Wb

30515 • Butterfield, Leah
Meets MWF 11:00AM-12:00PM • Internet
Wr
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AMS 311S • Prison Art/Lit/Protest-Wb

30510 • Genovese, Holly
Meets MWF 10:00AM-11:00AM • Internet
Wr
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AMS 311S • The Mind Of Jordan Peele-Wb

30525 • Ajani, Ja
Meets MWF 12:00PM-1:00PM • Internet
Wr
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AMS 315 • African American Culture

30530 • Walter, Patrick
Meets MWF 10:00AM-11:00AM BUR 214
CDEWr (also listed as AFR 301, ANT 310L)
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AMS 321 • Technology And Culture

30544 • Strover, Sharon
Meets MWF 12:00PM-1:00PM BUR 216 • Hybrid/Blended
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AMS 324J • Austin Jews Cvl Rights Era-Wb

30555 • Seriff, Suzanne
Meets TTH 12:30PM-2:00PM • Internet
CDII (also listed as ANT 325U)
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Segregation protests, sit-ins, free love, flower power—Revolution was in the air on 1960’s college campuses—UT included. Where were the Jews? In/out? Right/Left? Greek/geek? Activist/Pacifist? Gay/Straight? White/Other? Students will learn the art of oral history and digital storytelling to uncover the untold tales of UT’s Jewish students in the Age of Aquarius.


AMS 330 • Mdrnsm In Am Design/Arch-Ny

30574 • Mellins, Thomas
CD VP
show description

Upper-division standing required. Fulfills the core requirement for “Visual and Performing Arts”

SAME AS ARH 367 (TOPIC 3).

Description

This lecture course is intended to provide a broad knowledge of major issues in the history of American design and architecture from about 1880 to the present.  The central assumption of the course is that our environments both shape us and reflect what manner of people we are.  The term design is understood to include all elements of the built environment ranging from the smallest artifacts and products through buildings (whether vernacular or elite) to the shape of suburban and urban landscapes.  Students are encouraged to consider design in the context of social and cultural history.  Among topics to be considered are methods of cultural analysis of material artifacts; the rise, triumph, and fall of functionalism and the International Style; the emergence of uniquely American varieties of commercial design in a consumer society; the interactions of technology, economics, and design; the impact of the automobile on all levels of design; the rise of postmodern design and deconstructive architecture as counters to the modernist tradition; and design for the information age.  Among problems to be considered are tensions between tradition and novelty, between functional and expressive theories of design, between elite ideologies and popular desires, and between European and American design. 

 

Requirements

Although lectures will be illustrated with slides, this is not an image memorization course.  Grades will be based on:

Two in-class exams (the first counting 15%; the second 25%)

5-7 page paper based on original observation (30%)

Final exam (30%).

 

Possible Texts

Le Corbusier, Towards a New Architecture

Carma Gorman, The Industrial Design Reader

Jeffrey Meikle, Design in the USA

John Kasson, Amusing the Million

Karal Ann Marling, As Seen on TV

Michael Sorkin, Variations on a Theme Park


AMS 370 • American Food-Wb

30595 • Bendele, Marvin
Meets MW 1:00PM-2:30PM • Internet
CDIIWr (also listed as WGS 345)
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AMS 370 • Art/Data In The Digital Age-Wb

30583 • Chaar Lopez, Ivan
Meets TTH 12:30PM-2:00PM • Internet
IIWr
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AMS 370 • Children's Lit/Amer Cul-Wb

30590 • Mickenberg, Julia
Meets TTH 11:00AM-12:30PM • Internet
CDIIWr
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AMS 370 • Diners, Drive-Ins, Dives-Wb

30584 • Knerr, Kerry
Meets TTH 11:00AM-12:30PM • Internet
IIWr
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AMS 370 • Hist Black Entrepren In US

30630 • Walker, Juliet
Meets TTH 2:00PM-3:30PM MEZ B0.306
CDIIWr HI (also listed as AFR 351E, HIS 350R)
show description

Within the construct of African American Business history, race, contemporary American popular culture and global capitalism, this course will focus on an important aspect in the contemporary political economy of black Americans. Specifically, the commodification (sale) of black culture provides the conceptual frame for an examination of the phenomenon of both the superstar black athlete as an entrepreneur and the Hip Hop Superstar as an entrepreneur in post-Civil Rights America. The emphasis in this course, then, is to critically examine and analyze the impact of a multiplicity of societal, cultural and economic factors in the post-modern information age, propelled by new technologies in the New Economy of Global Capitalism. Also, consideration will be given to the new diversity as it impacts on the political economy of African Americans..  In addition, given the recent (Spring 2020) highly negative impact of the virulent Corona Virus, COVID-19 pandemic on the African American community, are there similarities/parallels between the factors contributing to the resulting socio-economic impact and conditions of free blacks, both as workers and entrepreneurs since 1865, with those of 21st century African Americans, also as workers and entrepreneurs, with both historical generations  contending with the persistent racial iniquities of capitalism?                                                                                                                                         

Proceeding from an interdisciplinary perspective, the course considers both the financial successes of superstar black athletes and hip hop entrepreneurs as well as their emergence as cultural icons, contrasted with the comparatively overall poor performance of Black Business not only within the intersection of race, gender, class, but also within the context of transnationalism in the globalization sale of African American Culture in post-Civil Rights America. But who profits? Most important, why is it that business receipts for African Americans, who comprise almost thirteen percent of this nation's population, amounted in 2007 to only .5%, that is, less than one (1) percent of the nation's total business receipts? In addition, why is it that among the various occupational categories in which blacks participate in the nation's economy, especially as businesspeople, that black entertainers and sports figures are the highest paid? What does this say about race, class, gender and hegemonic masculinities in America at the turn of the new century?

REQUIRED BOOKS
Eldridge, Lewis, Capitalism:  The New Segregation
Lewis, Reginald, Why Should White Guys Have All the Fun:  How Reginald Lewis Created a Billion-Dollar Business Empire
Marable, Manning, How Capitalism Underdeveloped Black America: Problems Race, Political Economy, and  Society  
O’Malley, Zach,  Empire State of Mind: How Jay Z Went from Street Corner to Corner Office,
Peebles, R. Donahue, The Peebles Principles: Tales and Tactics from an Entrepreneur's Life Winning Deals Succeeding in Business, and Creating a Fortune from Scratch
Smith-Shomade, Beretta,   Pimpin’ Ain’t Easy: Selling Black Entertainment Television
Stoute, Steve, Tanning of America:  How Hip Hop Created a Culture That Rewrote Rules of a New Economy
Walker, Juliet E. K. History Black Business in America: Capitalism, Race, Entrepreneurship [1998 edition] 


Critical Book Review Analysis       10% 
Oral Summary of Research Paper  5%
Class Discussion/Participation      20% 
Take-home Mid-Term Exam          25% 
 Seminar Research Paper (15 pp)  40%


AMS 370 • Hist Of Islam In The US-Wb

30640 • Spellberg, Denise
Meets W 3:00PM-6:00PM • Internet
CDIIWr HI (also listed as HIS 350R, ISL 372)
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This course is intended to do three things: provide a brief introduction to Islam for those unfamiliar with the religion and its early history; define the role of Islam and early American views of Muslims in the founding history of this country; and introduce students to major issues concerning contemporary American Muslims. The course surveys the presence of Islam in the United States from the colonial era to the twenty-first century through the use of historical documents and contemporary media, with a special focus on the politics of religion and race.  
The course is divided into three sections. The first explores the origins of Islam through primary textual examples. The second section focuses on early American views of Islam in the eighteenth and nineteenth centuries, with an emphasis on the earliest Muslims in the United States. The final section of the course analyzes the diversity of the contemporary American Muslim population, together with the politics surrounding notions of race, gender, immigration, and citizenship. Special emphasis placed on the challenges faced by young American Muslims in the twenty-first century. The course interrogates the question of whether one can be both American and Muslim in the 21st-century U.S
Objectives and Academic Flags
This course may be used to fulfill three hours of the U.S. history component of the university core curriculum. The course carries 3 University-approved “Flags”: Cultural Diversity (CD), Independent Inquiry (II), and Writing (WR). The aim of courses with a CD flag is to “increase your familiarity with the variety and richness of American cultural experience as it applies to marginalized communities, their history, beliefs, and practices.” The course is designated also as a Writing Flag, which features assignments designed to improve written communication. The Independent Inquiry Flag focuses on communication skills, critical thinking skills, personal responsibility, and social responsibility.   

Required Readings include:
Moustafa Bayoumi, How Does It Feel To Be a Problem? Being Young and Arab in America (2008). Jonathan Brown, Muhammad: A Very Short Introduction (2011)
Edward E. Curtis, IV, Muslims in America: A Short History (2009)
Kambiz GhaneaBassiri, A History of Islam in America (2010)
Shabana Mir, Muslim American Women on Campus: Undergraduate Social Life and Identity (2014).
 Other reading selections posted on Canvas.


Attendance Required: Class participation -unexcused absences result in deduction of points from the final grade.
Quiz 10%
First Essay 20%
Second Essay 20%
Biography final version 20%
Oral presentation 10%
Final Essay 20%


AMS 370 • Lit Of Black Politics-Wb

30610 • Marshall, Stephen
Meets TTH 9:30AM-11:00AM • Internet
IIWr (also listed as AFR 330R)
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AMS 370 • Puerto Rico In Crisis-Wb

30625 • Jimenez, Monica
Meets TTH 11:00AM-12:30PM • Internet
GCIIWr (also listed as AFR 350K)
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AMS 370 • Tejana Cultural Studies

30588 • Rosas, Lilia
Meets MW 2:30PM-4:00PM BUR 214
CDIIWr (also listed as MAS 374, WGS 340)
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With the publication ofEntre Guadalupe y Malinche, editors Inés Hernández-Ávila and Norma Elia Cantú solidify their mandate to legitimize Tejan@/x Studies as an arena worthy of ongoing research, study, and comprehension. Furthermore, they center the narratives of Tejanas as a necessary part of the conversation to understand this emergent field of inquiry and integral to Chicana Studies. In this course, we investigate the history of Tejanas to reaffirm and reclaim their place and role in the histories of Native Americans, woman, Chican@/xs, Greater Mexico, and the United States. We will further explore how transfronterizismo and transregionalism  complicate this history. Last, we will contemplate how their stories are fundamental to illuminating the struggles, resistance, and liberation of Chicanas, xicanindias, mestizas, and afromexicanas from precontact to decolonization.

 


AMS 370 • The Cultures Of Cities-Wb

30589 • Heyman, Richard
Meets TTH 3:30PM-5:00PM • Internet
IIWr
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AMS 370 • Urb Slavery In The Amers

30620 • Canizares, Jorge
Meets T 3:30PM-6:30PM BUR 116 • Hybrid/Blended
CDIIWr (also listed as AFR 350P, HIS 347N, LAS 366)
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We associate slavery with plantations, a rural institution, yet most slaves in the Americas wound up in cities, working as peddlers, artisans, barbers, pilots, healers, soldiers, and a variety of other occupations. Cities afforded slaves relatively more freedoms. In Spanish and Portuguese America it was common for urban slaves to purchase their own freedom through the institution of slave-for-hire, and cities witnessed the development of large free-colored communities.  Although cities enjoyed a larger presence of the government, often entire neighborhood remained outside state control, sheltering maroon communities (runaways slaves). Finally, although port-cities were more connected to the European Atlantic world, they were also connected to the African world. Africa survived in cities just as it did in remote rural plantations. Students will read recent new works on urban slavery in the Portuguese-, Dutch-, French-, British-, and Spanish -American worlds, but also in Africa itself (Sierra Leone, Luanda, Ouida, Anobamo).
 

Texts (a monograph per week) some examples:
 
Karl Jacoby The Strange Career of William Ellis: The Texas Slave Who Became a Mexican Millionaire
Robert Harms, The Diligent: A Voyage Through the Worlds of the Slave Trade
Jon F. Sensbach. Rebecca's Revival: Creating Black Christianity in the Atlantic World
 

Weekly papers: 70% grade
Final paper: 30 % grade


AMS 370 • Women Radicals/Reformers-Wb

30600 • Mickenberg, Julia
Meets TTH 2:00PM-3:30PM • Internet
CDIIWr
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AMS 390 • US Capitalism And Culture-Wb

30659 • Beasley, Alex
Meets M 12:00PM-3:00PM • Internet
(also listed as HIS 392, WGS 393)
show description

Graduate standing required. Permission from instructor required.


AMS 390 • Watershed Decade: The 1970s-Wb

30655 • Davis, Janet
Meets W 2:00PM-5:00PM • Internet
(also listed as HIS 389)
show description

Graduate standing required. Permission from instructor required.


AMS 391 • Cultl Lndscp And Ethnogr Meths

30660 • Lopez, Sarah
Meets W 9:30AM-12:30PM WMB 5.102 • Hybrid/Blended
show description

Graduate standing required. Permission from instructor required.


AMS 391 • Indigeneity And Immigration-Wb

30665 • Cox, James
Meets TTH 9:30AM-11:00AM • Internet
(also listed as E 395M)
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This course focuses on novels published in the late twentieth and early twenty-first century in which the authors attend both to indigeneity and immigration. We will spend the first few weeks reading criticism and theory by scholars working in Native American and Indigenous studies, settler colonial studies, and immigration studies and becoming familiar with federal Indian laws and immigration policies that shape and disrupt the lives of indigenes and immigrants. Authors under our consideration will include Oscar Casares, Louise Erdrich, Jhumpa Lahiri, Dinaw Mengestu, Joseph O’Neill, and Susan Power.


AMS 391 • Intro To Digital Humanities

30670 • Clement, Tanya
Meets T 3:00PM-6:00PM PAR 104
(also listed as E 388M, HIS 381, INF 383H)
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This course is a hands-on introduction to the Digital Humanities. In the Humanities,  we study how cultural context shapes how we create, understand, and interact with artifacts and systems. In DH, these artifacts and systems are digital. This course directs students to better understand the digital in terms of the humanities, including questions concerning Why digital: What knowledge systems are prioritized? What digital: What has been captured and what is not included? How digital: How have artifacts of study been produced, how structured, how made accessible? Who digital: Who is represented, by whose authority and for what audience? Where digital: Where does it come from? Where does it reside? Where does it go? When digital: What time periods and corresponding artifacts are represented digitally and what is excluded? 

This course will include learning to evaluate the nature of DH artifacts, projects, and scholarship through project-based exercises in creating and interpreting DH resources, and a close (and critical) look at the infrastructural, institutional, and political issues involved in creating, analyzing, disseminating, and preserving digital resources. As we look at the concepts, methods, and theories of DH through the perspective of practice, we will not only consider how computational methods are being used to further humanities research and teaching but how the humanities can deepen our understanding of computational methods and infrastructures.


AMS 391 • Race/Class/Gndr In Amer Tv-Wb

30674 • Beltran, Mary
Meets TH 12:30PM-3:30PM • Internet
(also listed as WGS 393)
show description

Graduate standing required. Permission from instructor required.


AMS 392 • Conference Course In Amer Stds

30675
show description

Graduate standing required. Permission from instructor required.


AMS 393 • Intro Rdgs In Amer Studies-Wb

30680 • Cordova, Cary
Meets T 1:00PM-4:00PM • Internet
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Graduate standing required. Seminar designed to acquaint the graduate student with the nature and extent of materials for interdisciplinary research on American culture. Consent of instructor required.