American Studies
American Studies

AMS 310 • Intro To American Studies

31495 • Chhun, Lina
Meets TTH 11:00AM-12:30PM GAR 0.102
CD HI
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This class introduces students to the field of American Studies. The guiding objective of the class is to use interdisciplinary lenses – such as music, dance, material culture, and urban studies – to develop a more complex understanding of American culture. In this class, we will investigate select aspects of American culture using various methodological approaches. The course outline follows a semi-linear pattern in history, but is hardly comprehensive. We will look broadly at the tensions between individual identity formation and the many social constructions that operate in American culture. The class is loosely tied around the connection, or disconnection, of individuals with mass culture (music, in particular, but also cars, corporations, television, and even fashion).


AMS 310 • Intro To American Studies

31500 • Cordova, Cary
Meets TTH 2:00PM-3:30PM BEL 328
CD HI
show description

This class introduces students to the field of American Studies. The guiding objective of the class is to use interdisciplinary lenses – such as music, dance, material culture, and urban studies – to develop a more complex understanding of American culture. In this class, we will investigate select aspects of American culture using various methodological approaches. The course outline follows a semi-linear pattern in history, but is hardly comprehensive. We will look broadly at the tensions between individual identity formation and the many social constructions that operate in American culture. The class is loosely tied around the connection, or disconnection, of individuals with mass culture (music, in particular, but also cars, corporations, television, and even fashion).


AMS 311S • Archives And Activism In Tx

31504 • Childress, Stephanie
Meets MW 1:00PM-2:30PM BUR 436A • Hybrid/Blended
Wr
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Writing, reading, and discussion on an American studies topic, with emphasis on the evaluation of information, analytical reading, and critical writing. Three lecture hours a week for one semester. May be repeated for credit when the topics vary.


AMS 311S • Radical Feminisms & Media

31511 • Tovar, Amanda
Meets TTH 12:30PM-2:00PM BUR 436B
Wr
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Writing, reading, and discussion on an American studies topic, with emphasis on the evaluation of information, analytical reading, and critical writing. Three lecture hours a week for one semester. May be repeated for credit when the topics vary.


AMS 311S • Science And Pop Culture

31512 • Schneider, Henrik
Meets TTH 3:30PM-5:00PM BUR 436A
Wr
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Writing, reading, and discussion on an American studies topic, with emphasis on the evaluation of information, analytical reading, and critical writing. Three lecture hours a week for one semester. May be repeated for credit when the topics vary.


AMS 311S • The American Body

31509 • Wilson, Kristen
Meets TTH 9:30AM-11:00AM BUR 436A
Wr
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Writing, reading, and discussion on an American studies topic, with emphasis on the evaluation of information, analytical reading, and critical writing. Three lecture hours a week for one semester. May be repeated for credit when the topics vary.


AMS 311S • Unburied: Ancestral Remains

31513 • Johnson, Taylor
Meets TTH 11:00AM-12:30PM BUR 436B
Wr
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Writing, reading, and discussion on an American studies topic, with emphasis on the evaluation of information, analytical reading, and critical writing. Three lecture hours a week for one semester. May be repeated for credit when the topics vary.


AMS 315F • Native American Lit And Cul

31514 • Shear, Richard
Meets MWF 2:00PM-3:00PM WAG 308
CDWr (also listed as E 314V)
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E 314V  |  5-Native American Literature and Culture

Instructor:  Shear, R

Unique #:  35354

Semester:  Fall 2022

Cross-lists:  AAS 314, 31514

 

Prerequisites:  One of the following: English 303C, Rhetoric and Writing 306, 306Q, 309K, or Tutorial Course 303C.

Description:  In this course we will attend to Native American voices ranging across different tribal affiliations, regions, and histories, voices rooted cultures whose origins precede European settlement of North America.  We will learn how these voices use literature to express distinct understandings of personal, cultural, and ecological flourishing and convey experiences of growth and loss in the face of displacement, modernization, and devaluation.  We will consider different methods of storytelling, discussing how literary acts can function as mechanisms of survival and resistance.  Drawing from poems, essays, short stories, novels, and activist writing, we will be learning from Native authors about the relationships between language and thought, history and storytelling, culture and politics.  The work we do for this class will be collaborative and oriented toward developing skills that will prove useful within and beyond the literary classroom.

The primary aim of this course is to help students develop and improve the critical reading, writing, and thinking skills needed for success in upper-division courses in English and other disciplines.  They will also gain practice in using the Oxford English Dictionary and other online research tools and print resources that support studies in the humanities.  Students will learn basic information literacy skills and models for approaching literature with various historical, generic, and cultural contexts in mind.

This course carries a writing flag and a cultural diversity in the US flag.  The writing assignments in this course are arranged procedurally with a focus on invention, development through instructor and peer feedback, and revision; they will constitute a major part of the final grade.

Tentative Texts:  Mathews, John Joseph. Sundown (1934); Silko, Leslie Marmon. Ceremony (1977); Erdrich, Louise. Tracks (1988); Episodes from Sterlin Harjo and Taika Waititi's Reservation Dogs (2021).

Requirements & Grading:  There will be a series of 3 short essays, the first of which must be revised and resubmitted.  Subsequent essays may also be revised and resubmitted by arrangement with the Instructor (75% of the final grade).  There will also be creative, collaborative projects, written reflections, and required in-class participation (25% of the final grade).


AMS 315O • Intro To Native Am Histories

31520 • Bsumek, Erika
Meets MWF 9:00AM-10:00AM GAR 0.102
CD HI (also listed as HIS 317L)
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This survey course will examine the history of Native American societies in North America from the earliest records to the present. We will explore the diverse ways in which Native American societies were structured, the different ways that indigenous peoples have responded to colonization and the complex history of European/Indigenous relations. Attention will be paid to political, social, economic and cultural transformation of Native American societies over time. We will cover, among other things, the following topics: disease, religion, trade, captivity narratives, warfare, diplomacy, removal, assimilation, education, self-determination, and gaming.


AMS 321 • Race/Gender/Surveillance

31535 • Browne, Simone
Meets TTH 2:00PM-3:30PM RLP 0.130
CDE (also listed as AFR 360D)
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AMS 321 • Screening Race

31530 • Mallapragada, Madhavi
Meets MW 3:30PM-5:00PM CMA 3.116
CD (also listed as AAS 335)
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AMS 321 • US In The Civil Rights Era

31540 • Green, Laurie
Meets MW 10:00AM-11:30AM SZB 4.414
CDE HI (also listed as AFR 351L, HIS 356P)
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A half century after the high point of the Civil Rights Movement in the U.S., most American students learn about the 1955 Montgomery Bus Boycott, the 1957 Little Rock conflict over school desegregation, the 1963 March on Washington, and the fire hoses in Birmingham. Far fewer encounter the less-televised moments of civil rights history, the meanings of freedom that included but went beyond desegregation, and the breadth of participation by local people. It is even less common to consider other movements that paralleled the black freedom movement among, for example, Mexican Americans, Native Americans, and Asian Americans. Taking a comparative perspective, this upper division lecture course explores these aspects of the civil rights era. It also examines their larger historical context within American culture from the Second World War to the present. This course is also intended to encourage students to consider questions about the writing of this history: How have civil rights scholars approached this history? What are their central arguments and how do we assess them? What has received the most attention, and what has received almost no attention? What kinds of sources have they used, and what are the benefits and/or drawbacks of these choices?


AMS 356 • Main Curr Amer Cul Since 1865

31585
Meets MW 11:00AM-12:30PM MEZ B0.306
CD HI
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Same as History 356K. Traces the development of American culture and society from the end of the Civil War to the present. Major themes include racial conflict, pluralism, religion, urban development and reform, modernism, government centralization, cultural radicalism, and the rebirth of conservatism. Three lecture hours a week for one semester. Prerequisite: Upper-division standing.


AMS 370 • Coastal Commun Early Amer

31620 • Kamil, Neil
Meets TTH 2:00PM-3:30PM GAR 2.128
IIWr HI (also listed as HIS 350R)
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Most of America’s earliest settlements were coastal communities.  Indeed, in human terms, bodies of water: oceans, lakes, rivers, bays, sounds, tidal pools, ponds, and streams helped define both the extent and limits of local, regional, and ultimately global history and culture.  Water simultaneously connected and separated through the movements of highly mobile populations which communicated through exploration, war, commerce, migration, and travel along routes sometimes millennia old during a time when travel by boat was far simpler than overland travel.  Hence, American history can be understood within the broad, transoceanic web of human geography called Atlantic history and culture.  The purpose of this course is to explore the social and cultural history of American coastal communities from an interactive perspective.  Ultimately, then, we are concerned with water and water-mediated culture as fundamental modes of contact and communication in the pre-industrial world.


AMS 370 • History Of Islam In The US

31615 • Spellberg, Denise
Meets W 3:00PM-6:00PM GAR 0.128
CDIIWr HI (also listed as HIS 350R, R S 346U)
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Dr. Spellberg                                                                                   Fall 2022                                                                         

HISTORY OF ISLAM IN THE UNITED STATES, HIS 350R-22, ISL 372, RS 346, AMS 346

Course Description: 

This course is intended to do three things: provide a brief introduction to Islam for those unfamiliar with the religion and its early history; define the role of Islam and early American views of Muslims in the founding history of this country; and introduce students to major issues concerning contemporary American Muslims. The course surveys the presence of Islam in the United States from the colonial era to the twenty-first century through the use of historical documents and contemporary media, with a special focus on the politics of religion and race. 

 

The course is divided into three sections. The first explores the origins of Islam through primary textual examples. The second section focuses on early American views of Islam in the eighteenth and nineteenth centuries, with an emphasis on the earliest Muslims in the United States. The final section of the course analyzes the diversity of the contemporary American Muslim population, together with the politics surrounding notions of race, gender, immigration, and citizenship. Special emphasis placed on the challenges faced by young American Muslims in the twenty-first century. The course interrogates the question of whether one can be both American and Muslim in the 21st-century U.S

 

Objectives and Academic Flags

This course may be used to fulfill three hours of the U.S. history component of the university core curriculum. The course carries 3 University-approved “Flags”: Cultural Diversity (CD), Independent Inquiry (II), and Writing (WR). The aim of courses with a CD flag is to “increase your familiarity with the variety and richness of American cultural experience as it applies to marginalized communities, their history, beliefs, and practices.” The course is designated also as a Writing Flag, which features assignments designed to improve written communication. The Independent Inquiry Flag focuses on communication skills, critical thinking skills, personal responsibility, and social responsibility.   


AMS 370 • Women In Postwar America

31604 • Green, Laurie
Meets MW 4:00PM-5:30PM GAR 2.128
IIWr HI (also listed as HIS 350R, WGS 345)
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This upper division history seminar examines U.S. women's history in the mid-twentieth century, roughly from World War II to the 1970s. Students have the opportunity to explore important themes far more deeply than is possible in a lecture course covering a longer period. While looking at what women did, the course explores historical understandings of womanhood, manhood and sexuality that became central to the cultural politics and social conflicts of the postwar period. This approach raises fresh questions about well-known episodes of U.S. history. Why, for example, do most Americans remember Rosa Parks only as a demure seamstress who initiated the Montgomery Bus Boycott because she was too tired to give up her seat to a white? Why do many imagine the women’s liberation movement of the 1960s as one of white middle-class bra burners? We explore how various groups (e.g., suburban girls, women of color, working-class women, immigrants, queer women and others) differently negotiated ideas of family, work, and sexuality. The goal is not to arrive at a universal or normative history of women, gender, and sexuality, but to explore how race, place, citizenship, and class shaped them. In doing so, we examine roots of issues that continue to have political purchase today. Weekly classes include discussion of readings, short lectures, films, and writing workshops.


AMS 390 • 20th Century US Social Mvmts

31660 • Davis, Janet
Meets TH 2:00PM-5:00PM BUR 436B
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Graduate standing required. Permission from instructor required.


AMS 390 • Feminist And Antiracist Tech

31650 • McElroy, Erin
Meets W 1:00PM-4:00PM BUR 436B
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Graduate standing required. Permission from instructor required.


AMS 390 • The Writing Of The Past

31654 • Schwartz, Ana
Meets T 2:00PM-5:00PM PAR 214
(also listed as AFR 385C, E 389M)
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Drawing on recent interventions within the disciplines of history and literary history on the limits of the official documentary archive, this class turns to the toolkit of close reading to consider, first, how to write more sensitively about the past, and, second, how to understand with more sensitivity how the past wrote about itself. Our central text will be the enduringly enigmatic Narrative of the Life and Adventures of Venture, a Native of Africa. This text will ground our readings of foundational texts in the study of the eighteenth and early nineteenth century Atlantic world, in the study of labor, slavery, and dispossession, and in the study of strategies of critique that the first adventurers of that new world developed in order to understand its most frustrating paradoxes. Supplementary readings will include selections from the following texts: Ania Loomba, Colonialism/PostColonialism, Saidiya Hartman, Scenes of Subjection; Cedric Robinson, Black Marxism, Orlando Patterson, Slavery and Social Death, and Lisa Lowe, The Intimacies of Four Continents. Students can expect to acquire a strong sense of how early American history and its literature have enduring salience in the critical work of the present, as well as confidence regarding their ability to write simultaneously for their own and other humanities disciplines.


AMS 390 • U.s. Capitalism & Culture

31655 • Beasley, Alex
Meets W 10:00AM-1:00PM BUR 436A
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Graduate standing required. Permission from instructor required.


AMS 391 • Intro To Digital Humanities

31665 • Clement, Tanya
Meets T 3:00PM-6:00PM FAC 7
(also listed as E 388M, HHM 383, HIS 381, INF 383H)
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This course is a hands-on introduction to Digital Humanities, which may be defined as “a nexus of fields within which scholars use computing technologies to investigate the kinds of questions that are traditional to the humanities, or. . . [ask] humanities-oriented questions about computing technologies” (Kathleen Fitzpatrick, “Reporting from the Digital Humanities 2010 Conference,” ProfHacker). What are these questions? As usual, it depends, depends on the scholar’s theoretical orientation, methods, and resources at hand (including not only primary source materials, but time, skill, and support). This course will include learning to evaluate DH questions and DH projects through project-based exercises in creating and interpreting digital humanities resources and tools and a close (and critical) look at the infrastructural, institutional, and political issues involved in interrogating “the digital” in the humanities. As we look at the concepts, methods, theories, and resources of DH through the perspective of practice, we will consider how computational methods are being used to further humanities research and how our understanding of computing technologies is deepened by humanities research.
 
No prerequisites are required for this course.


AMS 392 • Conference Course In Amer Stds

31675
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Graduate standing required. Permission from instructor required.


AMS 393 • Intro Readings In Amer Studies

31680 • Cordova, Cary
Meets M 10:00AM-1:00PM BUR 436A
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Graduate standing required. Seminar designed to acquaint the graduate student with the nature and extent of materials for interdisciplinary research on American culture. Consent of instructor required.