Department of Geography and the Environment

GRG 301K • Weather And Climate-Wb

37295 • Kimmel, Troy
Meets TTH 11:00AM-12:30PM • Internet
N1
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Utilizing critical thinking skills, this course is an introductory look at weather and climate, this course will include a thorough discussion of atmospheric processes, clouds, precipitation (types), air masses, frontal boundaries, introductory discussions of severe local storms (and their offspring) and tropical cyclones as well as the climatology of these weather systems. Also included will be a brief introduction to the Koppen Climatic Classification System.


GRG 305 • This Hmn Wrld: Intro To Grg-Wb

37330-37370
Meets MWF 1:00PM-2:00PM • Internet
GC SB
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Course Description

This course focuses on learning why things are where they are and the processes that underlie spatial patterns. These processes are fundamentally cultural: they involve a complex mix of folk culture, popular culture, communication, religion, demography, industry and urbanization, so the course touches on all of these topics. The course also looks at the indications of human-induced environmental changes, including pollution, resource depletion, and the transformation of ecosystems. It concludes with an introduction to the range of career opportunities for people with training in geography.

Grading Policy

Final grades will be based on a combination of three exams (worth approximately 45% of the total grade), three projects (worth approximately 25% of the total grade) and participation (worth approximately 30% of the total grade).


GRG 319 • Geography Of Latin America-Wb

37390 • Knapp, Gregory
Meets TTH 2:00PM-3:30PM • Internet
GC SB
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Course Description

This course is a general introduction to Latin American environments and peoples from a geographical perspective. There are no prerequisites, and an effort is made to make the material accessible to the broadest possible range of students, as citizens and future leaders. At the same time, more advanced students can benefit from the exploration of such topics as landforms, ecology, environmental hazards, Native American lifeways and resource management, the insertion of Latin America in the global economy, population, cities, sustainable development, geopolitics, frontiers, conservation, and cultural survival. The class can serve as a basic preparation for travel, business, government service, journalism or volunteer work in Latin America, as well as for elementary or secondary school teaching.

This course can be used toward a major or minor in either Geography or Latin American Studies. In the Geography major, the course meets the human geography core requirement, and is also appropriate for students taking the Cultural Geography, Environmental Resource Management, and General Geography tracks. The course can be used to meet the Area B requirement for the Colleges of Liberal Arts and Natural Sciences. This course may not be used towards the Area C requirement (some other courses in geography do meet this requirement). All students are required to take the final exam.

Grading Policy

Exams test knowledge of locations (with map questions), concepts, explanations, and solutions. The tests contain objective, map, and short-answer essay type questions. The student is responsible for all the material in the readings, assigned web pages, and lectures, including maps and other graphics, but the lectures are most important. Quizzes are handed out at the beginning of several lectures.

Quizzes & Attendance (15%) Three Exams (60%) Project (details to be announced in class) (25%).


GRG 333C • Severe And Unusual Weather-Wb

37425 • Kimmel, Troy
Meets TTH 2:00PM-3:30PM • Internet
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Utilizing critical thinking skills, this course examines the principles and techniques of atmospheric science and the applications to the study of severe and unusual weather events and patterns. This course will include a thorough examination (often in real time through the use of the internet) of thunderstorms, tornadoes, flash floods, hailstorms, winter storms, tropical cyclones as well as drought. In addition to study of the events themselves, a look at the climatology of severe and unusual weather across the United States, Texas as well as our own south central Texas region will be undertaken. How these atmospheric events affect human beings and how people respond to these events will also be examined.


GRG 333K • Climate Change

37430 • Beach, Timothy
Meets TTH 12:30PM-2:00PM RLP 1.104 • Hybrid/Blended
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Course Description:

This course will survey the causes of changes in climatic systems over both short and long time periods and their consequences for landscape dynamics, biogeography, land use, sustainability, and vulnerability. The first part of the course will introduce the study of climates from an earth systems approach. Implications of differences in climate for carbon, biodiversity, and humans will be discussed. The second part of the course will look at historical and current climate change trends and controls worldwide, including coverage of the different scientific methods used for studies of these processes. We will build towards developing the expertise to critically evaluate future climate scenarios using environmental and socio-ecological approaches.

Students are expected to read the assigned readings and participate actively in class. The exams will test knowledge, vocabulary, and ability to explain and apply information.  The class projects and writing assignment will work on the ability to synthesize and communicate on scientific issues associated with climate change.

 Prerequisites:

Assumes background from GRG 301C, GRG 301K, or an equivalent course.


GRG 335D • Anthropocene-Wb

37445 • Young, Kenneth
Meets TTH 11:00AM-12:30PM • Internet
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ANTHROPOCENE

 

GRG 335D, Fall 2021

TTh 11 AM-12:15 PM (T online; Th optional office hour)

 

Dr. Kenneth R. Young

Department of Geography and the Environment, UT-Austin

kryoung@austin.utexas.edu

 

Course description:

This course is designed to evaluate the cumulative effects of humans on Earth. It will use readings, (asynchronous) lectures, and class exercises to examine the kinds of evidence used 1) to reconstruct past environments, 2) to decipher the ecological and biogeographical consequences of land use, 3) to measure altered surface processes, 4) to distinguish the anthropogenic contribution to climate change, and 5) to predict likely future scenarios. The course will explore the interaction of human history with altered biophysical patterns and processes. Finally, the class will collectively and critically assess the recognition of the Anthropocene as a potential new epoch in Earth history, including the implications of that recognition for environmental stewardship.  

Students are expected to read the assigned readings and participate actively in class. The exams will test knowledge, vocabulary, and ability to explain and apply information. The class projects and writing assignment will work on the ability to synthesize and communicate on the associated scientific issues.

 

Prerequisites:  Assumes background from GRG 401C/301C, GRG 301K, or an equivalent course.

 

Required textbooks (all also available in digital form as ebooks):

Lenton, T. 2016. Earth System Science: A Very Short Introduction. ISBN 9780198718871

Lewis, S. L. & M. A. Maslin. 2018. The Human Planet: How We Created the Anthropocene. Yale University Press, New Haven. ISBN 9780300232172

Scott, J. C. 2017. Against the Grain: A Deep History of the Earliest States. Yale University Press, New Haven. ISBN 9780300182910


GRG 335N • Landscape Ecology-Wb

37450 • Polk, Molly
Meets MW 11:30AM-1:00PM • Internet
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The study of spatial patterns in the earth's biosphere found within landscapes, typically areas measured in square kilometers. Examines the processes that create those patterns, drawing from ecology, biogeography, and many other disciplines. Also explores the practical applications of landscape ecology to the study of natural environments and those managed or altered by human activities. Geography 335N and 356T (Topic: Landscape Ecology) may not both be counted.

Prerequisite: Upper-division standing and three semester hours of coursework in physical geography or one of the geological or natural sciences.


GRG 336 • Contemp Cultural Geography-Wb

37455 • Rahman, Muhammad
Meets MW 1:00PM-2:30PM • Internet
CDIIWr
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Recent theoretical developments in cultural geography, with a focus on landscapes and the everyday practices that imbue them with meaning; the ways those meanings are contested and are the foci of struggle; and how the relationship between culture and space plays a central role in the social construction of identity. Only one of the following may be counted: Geography 336, Urban Studies 354 (Topic: Contemporary Cultural Geography), 354 (Topic 8).

Prerequisite: Upper-division standing.

May be counted toward the writing flag requirement. May be counted toward the cultural diversity flag requirement. May be counted toward the independent inquiry flag requirement.

SAME AS URB 354 (TOPIC 8).


GRG 350E • Geoprocessing-Wb

37470 • Arima, Eugenio
Meets MW 1:00PM-2:30PM • Internet
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Computer programming and scripting applied to geospatial data.

Geography 350E and 356T (Topic: Geoprocessing) may not both be counted.

Prerequisite: Upper-division standing and Geography 460G.

Offered on the letter-grade basis only.


GRG 356 • Environmental Law-Wb

37475 • Challa, Zeenia
Meets MW 4:00PM-5:30PM • Internet
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Please check back for updates.

Prerequisite: Upper-division standing.


GRG 356 • Spatial Reasoning With Gis

37480 • Miller, Jennifer
Meets TTH 2:00PM-3:30PM RLP 1.402 • Hybrid/Blended
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Please check back for updates.

Prerequisite: Upper-division standing.


GRG 356T • Gis/Rem Sns Arch/Paleo-Wb

37489 • Reed, Denne
Meets MW 1:00PM-2:30PM • Internet
QR (also listed as ANT 324L)
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This course surveys archeological and paleontological applications of remotely sensed data such as aerial photography and satellite imagery for use in locating field sites, planning field logistics and conducting landscape analysis. The remote sensing component of the course covers remote sensing data acquisition, image georectification, image processing and classification. The GIS component of the course builds on the remote sensing component and adds to it the analysis of map features stored in databases. The course introduces databases theory and practice, and moves through the various stages of GIS workflow: the planning and design of GIS projects, building geospatial datasets, various methods of geospatial analysis and a short introduction to map layouts and reports. This course covers GIS and remote sensing from an applied perspective and students are expected to invest lab time in completing tutorials on GIS and RS methods as well as applying these methods to individual projects.


GRG 356T • Grg Lat American-U.s. Migr-Wb

37484
Meets MW 1:00PM-2:30PM • Internet
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GRG 356T • Maya Art/Architecture-Gua

37485 • Runggaldier, Astrid
GCII VP (also listed as ANT 324L, LAS 327)
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Please check back for updates.


GRG 385H • Wetlnds: Earth Sys Sci/Hist

37555 • Beach, Timothy
Meets W 1:00PM-4:00PM RLP 3.102 • Hybrid/Blended
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Biophysical, historical, and policy/restoration components of wetlands with global and regional case studies.

Geography 385H and 396T (Topic: Wetlands and Floodplains) may not both be counted.

Prerequisite: Graduate standing.

 


GRG 390L • Research In Geography-Wb

37559 • Torres, Rebecca
Meets TH 3:00PM-6:00PM • Internet
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Builds on topics explored in Geography 390K by focusing on epistemology and research in the field of geography. Students develop plans for research and write a research proposal.

Required of all first-year graduate students in geography.

Prerequisite: Graduate standing and Geography 390K.


GRG 392M • Biodiversity Conservation-Wb

37560 • Young, Kenneth
Meets M 4:00PM-7:00PM • Internet
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Seminar in Biodiversity Conservation: Preparing for Change

GRG 392M, Spring 2021

M 4-7 PM (online)

Dr. Kenneth R. Young (kryoung@austin.utexas.edu)

Department of Geography & the Environment, UT-Austin

 

Course goals:
          This course will use a graduate-student seminar format to examine the state of knowledge about biodiversity conservation, with special attention to future challenges that involve both environmental and social dimensions of change. This semester we will scrutinize human-environment interfaces, especially in relation to diseases and natural disturbances. We also will evaluate planning challenges for possible impending changes. Students are expected to read the relevant literature, to actively participate in class discussions, and to write three essays. The seminar is designed to expose participants to new research concerning the consequences of global change for biological diversity, and to acquire experience in communicating scientific findings.

 

Course schedule:

    Part 1:  Humans and the environment

    Part 2:  Pyrogeography

    Part 3:  Synergisms and change

       

Required textbooks:

R. Colwell. 2020. A Lab of Own’s Own: One Woman’s Personal Journal Through Sexism and Science. Simon & Schuster. ISBN 9781501181276 (hardcover; also available as ebook)

T. Ord. 2020. The Precipice: Existential Risk and the Future of Humanity. Hachette Books. ISBN 9780316484923 (paperback, also as ebook

A. C. Scott. 2020. Fire: A Short Introduction. Oxford University Press. ISBN 9780198830030 (paperback; also available as ebook)

T. C. Winegard. 2020. The Mosquito: A Human History of our Deadliest Predator. Dutton. ISBN 97815224743420 (paperback; also available in ebook form)

 


GRG 462K • Intro Remote Sensing Of Env-Wb

37510-37515 • Meyer, Thoralf
Meets MW 8:30AM-10:00AM • Internet
QR
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The use of electromagnetic energy to sense objects in the natural environment; interpretation and recognition of patterns detected by sensors. 

Prerequisite: Upper-division standing.



  • Department of Geography and the Environment

    The University of Texas at Austin
    305 E. 23rd Street, A3100
    RLP 3.306
    Austin, TX 78712
    512-471-5116