Department of Psychology
Department of Psychology

Bertram Gawronski


ProfessorPh.D., Humboldt University Berlin (Germany)

Bertram Gawronski

Contact

Interests


Social Cognition, Attitudes, Decision-Making, Moral Psychology, Meta-Theory, Psychological Measurement

Biography


Dr. Gawronski earned his M.A. in Philosophy at the Free University Berlin (Germany) in 1998 and his Ph.D. in Psychology at Humboldt University Berlin (Germany) in 2001. He was as a postdoctoral fellow at the University of Würzburg (Germany) from 2001 to 2002 and at Northwestern University from 2002 to 2004. Before joining the University of Texas at Austin in 2014, he held positions as Professor of Psychology and Canada Research Chair in Social Psychology at The University of Western Ontario (Canada).

Dr. Gawronski will not accept new graduate students for the fall 2021.

 

Courses


PSY 355S • Social Cognition-Wb

41485 • Fall 2020
Meets TTH 11:00AM-12:30PM
Internet

Examine major theories and research findings in social cognition.

PSY 394V • Theory/Explanatn Socl Psych

42224 • Spring 2020
Meets T 1:00PM-4:00PM SEA 5.106

Seminars in Social and Personality Psychology. Three lecture hours a week for one semester. May be repeated for credit when the topics vary. Prerequisite: Graduate standing and consent of instructor.

PSY 355S • Social Cognition

41699 • Fall 2019
Meets TTH 11:00AM-12:30PM UTC 3.124

Examine major theories and research findings in social cognition.

Psychology 341K (Topic: Social Cognition) and 355S may not both be counted.

Prerequisite: For psychology majors, upper-division standing and Psychology 301 and 418 with a grade of at least C in each; for others, upper-division standing, Psychology 301 with a grade of at least C, and one of the following with a grade of at least C: African and African Diaspora Studies 302M, Civil Engineering 311S, Economics 329, Educational Psychology 371, Electrical Engineering 351K, Government 350K, Mathematics 316, 362K, Mechanical Engineering 335, Psychology 317,Sociology 317L, Social Work 318, Statistics 309, Statistics and Data Sciences 301, 302 (or Statistics and Scientific Computation 302), 303 (or Statistics and Scientific Computation 303), 304 (or Statistics and Scientific Computation 304), 305 (or Statistics and Scientific Computation 305), 306 (or Statistics and Scientific Computation 306), 318 (or Statistics and Scientific Computation 318), 321 (or Statistics and Scientific Computation 321), 328M (or Statistics and Scientific Computation 328M).

PSY 341K • Social Cognition

42812 • Fall 2018
Meets TTH 11:00AM-12:30PM UTC 4.110

This lecture course is designed to provide students with an understanding of the process of braindevelopment from embryogenesis through adulthood with emphasis on the role of the environment in directing this process. Initial lectures will focus on the origins of the central nervous system, including topics such as the organization of the brain, neurogenesis, cellular differentiation, migration and targeting of neurons, synapse formation and refinement of the nervous system. In the second half of the course, lectures will focus on the infant brain and the role of experiences during infancy in modifying brain function. Topics will also include recent advances in our understanding of the role of gene-environment interactions and epigenetic programming and shaping brain development. Finally, the adaptive vs. maladaptive outcomes of environmental modifications to the nervous system will be discussed. Throughout the course, students will be guided through examples of how changes in the developing nervous system lead to behavioral patterns both in infancy and adulthood.

PSY 394V • Theory, Explanation In Soc Psy

42989 • Spring 2018
Meets M 1:00PM-4:00PM SEA 5.106

Seminars in Social and Personality Psychology. Three lecture hours a week for one semester. May be repeated for credit when the topics vary. Prerequisite: Graduate standing and consent of instructor.

PSY 341K • Social Cognition

43145 • Fall 2017
Meets TTH 11:00AM-12:30PM NOA 1.124

This lecture course is designed to provide students with an understanding of the process of braindevelopment from embryogenesis through adulthood with emphasis on the role of the environment in directing this process. Initial lectures will focus on the origins of the central nervous system, including topics such as the organization of the brain, neurogenesis, cellular differentiation, migration and targeting of neurons, synapse formation and refinement of the nervous system. In the second half of the course, lectures will focus on the infant brain and the role of experiences during infancy in modifying brain function. Topics will also include recent advances in our understanding of the role of gene-environment interactions and epigenetic programming and shaping brain development. Finally, the adaptive vs. maladaptive outcomes of environmental modifications to the nervous system will be discussed. Throughout the course, students will be guided through examples of how changes in the developing nervous system lead to behavioral patterns both in infancy and adulthood.

PSY 341K • Psychology Of Attitudes

42373 • Spring 2016
Meets T 3:30PM-6:30PM SEA 2.108
Wr

This lecture course is designed to provide students with an understanding of the process of braindevelopment from embryogenesis through adulthood with emphasis on the role of the environment in directing this process. Initial lectures will focus on the origins of the central nervous system, including topics such as the organization of the brain, neurogenesis, cellular differentiation, migration and targeting of neurons, synapse formation and refinement of the nervous system. In the second half of the course, lectures will focus on the infant brain and the role of experiences during infancy in modifying brain function. Topics will also include recent advances in our understanding of the role of gene-environment interactions and epigenetic programming and shaping brain development. Finally, the adaptive vs. maladaptive outcomes of environmental modifications to the nervous system will be discussed. Throughout the course, students will be guided through examples of how changes in the developing nervous system lead to behavioral patterns both in infancy and adulthood.

PSY 341K • Social Cognition

42305 • Fall 2015
Meets TTH 9:30AM-11:00AM NOA 1.124

This lecture course is designed to provide students with an understanding of the process of braindevelopment from embryogenesis through adulthood with emphasis on the role of the environment in directing this process. Initial lectures will focus on the origins of the central nervous system, including topics such as the organization of the brain, neurogenesis, cellular differentiation, migration and targeting of neurons, synapse formation and refinement of the nervous system. In the second half of the course, lectures will focus on the infant brain and the role of experiences during infancy in modifying brain function. Topics will also include recent advances in our understanding of the role of gene-environment interactions and epigenetic programming and shaping brain development. Finally, the adaptive vs. maladaptive outcomes of environmental modifications to the nervous system will be discussed. Throughout the course, students will be guided through examples of how changes in the developing nervous system lead to behavioral patterns both in infancy and adulthood.

PSY 394V • Theory & Explain In Social Psy

42950 • Spring 2015
Meets T 1:00PM-4:00PM SEA 5.106

Seminars in Social and Personality Psychology. Three lecture hours a week for one semester. May be repeated for credit when the topics vary. Prerequisite: Graduate standing and consent of instructor.

PSY 341K • Social Cognition

43720 • Fall 2014
Meets TTH 11:00AM-12:30PM NOA 1.124

This lecture course is designed to provide students with an understanding of the process of braindevelopment from embryogenesis through adulthood with emphasis on the role of the environment in directing this process. Initial lectures will focus on the origins of the central nervous system, including topics such as the organization of the brain, neurogenesis, cellular differentiation, migration and targeting of neurons, synapse formation and refinement of the nervous system. In the second half of the course, lectures will focus on the infant brain and the role of experiences during infancy in modifying brain function. Topics will also include recent advances in our understanding of the role of gene-environment interactions and epigenetic programming and shaping brain development. Finally, the adaptive vs. maladaptive outcomes of environmental modifications to the nervous system will be discussed. Throughout the course, students will be guided through examples of how changes in the developing nervous system lead to behavioral patterns both in infancy and adulthood.

Research


Dr. Gawronski's research aims at understanding social judgments and social behavior by identifying their underlying mental processes. Central questions are concerned with the antecedents, mental underpinnings, and downstream consequences of spontaneous and deliberate responses to objects, individuals, groups, and social issues. To address these questions, his research utilizes a combination of lab and online studies, explicit and implicit measures, and computational modeling. Major lines of current research include moral judgment and decision-making, attitude formation and change, and effects of misinformation. In addition to these major themes, his work is concerned with basic questions of psychological measurement and meta-theoretical issues in the construction and evaluation of psychological theories.

 

 

Publications


Brannon, S. M., Carr, S., Jin, E. S., Josephs, R. A., & Gawronski, B. (2019). Exogenous testosterone increases sensitivity to moral norms in moral dilemma judgments. Nature Human Behavior, 3, 856-866.

Conway, P., & Gawronski, B. (2013). Deontological and utilitarian inclinations in moral decision-making: A process dissociation approach. Journal of Personality and Social Psychology, 104, 216-235.

Galdi, S., Arcuri, L., & Gawronski, B. (2008). Automatic mental associations predict future choices of undecided decision-makers. Science, 321, 1100-1102.

Gawronski, B., Armstrong, J., Conway, P., Friesdorf, R., & Hütter, M. (2017). Consequences, norms, and generalized inaction in moral dilemmas: The CNI model of moral decision-making. Journal of Personality and Social Psychology, 113, 343-376.

Gawronski, B., & Bodenhausen, G. V. (2006). Associative and propositional processes in evaluation: An integrative review of implicit and explicit attitude change. Psychological Bulletin, 132, 692-731.

Gawronski, B., & Bodenhausen, G. V. (2011). The associative-propositional evaluation model: Theory, evidence, and open questions. Advances in Experimental Social Psychology, 44, 59-127.

Gawronski, B., & Cesario, J. (2013). Of mice and men: What animal research can tell us about context effects on automatic responses in humans. Personality and Social Psychology Review, 17, 187-215.

Gawronski, B., Rydell, R. J., De Houwer, J., Brannon, S. M., Ye, Y., Vervliet, B., & Hu, X. (2018). Contextualized attitude change. Advances in Experimental Social Psychology, 57, 1-52.

Gawronski, B., Rydell, R. J., Vervliet, B., & De Houwer, J. (2010). Generalization versus contextualization in automatic evaluation. Journal of Experimental Psychology: General, 139, 683-701.

Heycke, T., & Gawronski, B. (2020). Co-occurrence and relational information in evaluative learning: A multinomial modeling approach. Journal of Experimental Psychology: General, 149, 104-124.

 

A comprehensive publication list is available at Dr. Gawronski's lab website.

 

Books


Deutsch, R., Gawronski, B., & Hofmann, W. (Eds.). (2017). Reflective and impulsive determinants of human behavior. New York: Psychology Press. [order]

Gawronski, B., & Bodenhausen, G. V. (Eds.). (2015). Theory and explanation in social psychology. New York: Guilford Press. [order]

Gawronski, B., & Payne, B. K. (Eds.). (2010). Handbook of implicit social cognition: Measurement, theory, and applications. New York: Guilford Press. [order]

Gawronski, B., & Strack, F. (Eds.). (2012). Cognitive consistency: A fundamental principle in social cognition. New York: Guilford Press. [order]

Sherman, J. W., Gawronski, B., & Trope, Y. (Eds.). (2014). Dual-process theories of the social mind. New York: Guilford Press. [order]

 


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